Pulitzer Prize for Cartooning

Pulitzer Prize for Cartooning

When Joseph Pulitzer, the publisher of the New York World died in 1911. In his will left $2 million for the establishment of a school of journalism at Columbia University and annual prizes for literature, drama, music and journalism.

Since 1922 Pulitzer Prizes have also been awarded to cartoonists. Winners have included Rollin Kirby (1922, 1925 and 1929) Jay Norwood Darling (1924 and 1943), Daniel Fitzpatrick (1926 and 1955), Edmund Duffy (1931, 1934 and 1940), John McCutcheon (1932), Clarence Batchelor (1937), Vaughan Shoemaker (1937 and 1947), Jacob Burck (1941), Herbert Block (1942, 1954 and 1979), Clifford Berryman (1944), Bill Mauldin (1945 and 1959), Lute Pease (1949), Paul Conrad (1964, 1971 and 1984), Pat Oliphant (1967) and Paul Szep (1974 and 1977).


Pulitzer Issues No Prize For Editorial Cartooning, Rejects Finalists

Tthe following tweet from the Pulitzer Prize committee, posted yesterday, stated that "No prize was awarded in Editorial Cartooning".

But no, it appears that Stan Lee's estate will not be suing over this one, as I initially expected when I read it. And was expecting something like this.

Basically, the Pulitzer Prize states that no editorial cartoonist was worthy of the prize this year. And certainly none of the finalists.

The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists strongly disagrees with the decision by the Pulitzer Board to award no Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Cartooning in 2021. We are mystified by the pointed rejection of talented Finalists as well as the many other artists who have been creating powerful work in these most eventful and challenging of times.

The medium of editorial cartooning has been evolving for many years now, yet the Pulitzer board remains extremely traditional and narrow-minded in its tastes, apparently uncomfortable with contemporary trends in opinion cartooning and comic art. Last year the board discarded the jurors' choices and selected its own winner this year represents a new low in this trend of insularity and institutional hubris.

It is notable that the three Finalists chosen for 2021 were of Jewish, Latinx, and Native American backgrounds, yet this is the first time in 48 years that the board has chosen not to issue an award. No woman has won in twenty years, and there has been only one female Finalist during those two decades.

As this has been a tremendously difficult time economically for our profession, the AAEC would like to request a return of the entry fees for those who submitted. We would also urge radical structural reform of the award to evaluate modern opinion cartoons by 21st century standards.

Jen Sorensen
President of the AAEC

AAEC Board of Directors
Kevin Siers
Liza Donnelly
Ed Hall
Tim Campbell
Gretchen Koch
Monte Wolverton

And hey, I didn't even get a call, despite this humdinger&hellip


STARTED IT OFF WITH THE PULITZER

Rube Goldberg had a sort of love affair with newspapers even as a child. When he was young, he had a paper route where he delivered newspapers. This was the time when he first appreciated how good the paper used for the publications smelled. Little did he know at that time, however, that he would become involved in making big news. Of course, he did not even know that he would make it as a cartoonist. His father wanted him to take up engineering. It was a clash that seemed hopeless at first. Rube did not know yet then that those opposing desires would later help him become the artist that people had admired him to be.


Pulitzer Prize Committee Names No Editorial Cartooning Winner This Year

This is historical. Most years, there is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. This year, for the first time in 48 years, the Board refused to select one, ignoring the three finalists and selecting “No Award”.

This Poynter article explains how the process is supposed to work:

[No winner is awarded] if a finalist doesn’t receive a majority vote among the 18 board members. For each Pulitzer category, a group of judges sift through all the submissions and pick three unranked finalists as well as three alternates. Those six pieces then go to the Pulitzer Prize Board, which discusses the entries. At least 10 board members must vote for a finalist for it to be named as a winner.

The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists put out a statement in which they implied the Board was racist and overly conservative:

We are mystified by the pointed rejection of talented Finalists as well as the many other artists who have been creating powerful work in these most eventful and challenging of times.
The medium of editorial cartooning has been evolving for many years now, yet the Pulitzer board remains extremely traditional and narrow-minded in its tastes, apparently uncomfortable with contemporary trends in opinion cartooning and comic art. Last year the board discarded the jurors’ choices and selected its own winner this year represents a new low in this trend of insularity and institutional hubris.
It is notable that the three Finalists chosen for 2021 were of Jewish, Latinx, and Native American backgrounds, yet this is the first time in 48 years that the board has chosen not to issue an award. No woman has won in twenty years, and there has been only one female Finalist during those two decades.
As this has been a tremendously difficult time economically for our profession, the AAEC would like to request a return of the entry fees for those who submitted. We would also urge radical structural reform of the award to evaluate modern opinion cartoons by 21st century standards.

Much of the stunned reaction has been along similar lines, with many noting that the year 2020 was particularly newsworthy and noteworthy and to not recognize a winner feels like a ducking of responsibility. Three of the biggest cartoon syndicates, Andrews McMeel Syndication, King Features and Creators Syndicate, also released a statement along similar lines:

In choosing to name no winner, the Committee fails to acknowledge the hard work of so many editorial cartoonists, particularly the work of cartoonists from underrepresented backgrounds, in a year of tremendous social and political change.

Tom Tomorrow, who has served as a Pulitzer juror, had thoughts to share.

[I]n rejecting all three and declining to nominate an alternate, the Pulitzer Board has effectively announced that in 2020, the year of covid and George Floyd and Black Lives Matter and Donald Trump’s attempt to overturn an election, not a single American political cartoonist produced work that was worthy of recognition. I just don’t believe that’s true.

I would agree, as would many others. It remains to be seen if any change will come.


Another 11 years passed before the Courier Journal would win another Pulitzer, but when the awards were announced that year, it touched off a 14-year stretch in which the newspaper would collect five of them.

The 1967 award was given to the paper for several years of coverage of strip mining in Kentucky and its efforts, which finally paid off in 1966 when Kentucky passed some of the toughest strip-mining laws in the nation.

The award went to the entire staff of the newspaper, as it should have. John Fetterman, one of the reporters who had covered the issue, wrote that "dozens of people — from reporter to publisher" — worked over the years, going back to the 1940s, to bring about changes.

Stories were accompanied by photos of the ravaged land and were followed by editorials and cartoons calling for laws to stop the rape of Kentucky's mountains in the east and flatter lands in the west.

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Interested in this topic? You may also want to view these photo galleries:

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Year Winner Organization Rationale
1922 Rollin Kirby New York World "For 'On the Road to Moscow.'"
1923 No award given.
1924 Jay Norwood Darling Des Moines Register & Tribune "For 'In Good Old USA.'"
1925 Rollin Kirby New York World "For 'News from the Outside World.'"
1926 D. R. Fitzpatrick St. Louis Post-Dispatch "For 'The Laws of Moses and the Laws of Today.'"
1927 Nelson Harding Brooklyn Daily Eagle "For 'Toppling the Idol.'"
1928 Nelson Harding Brooklyn Daily Eagle "For 'May His Shadow Never Grow Less.'"
1929 Rollin Kirby New York World "For 'Tammany.'"
1930 Charles R. Macauley Brooklyn Daily Eagle "For 'Paying for a Dead Horse.'"
1931 Edmund Duffy The Baltimore Sun "For 'An Old Struggle Still Going On.'"
1932 John T. McCutcheon Chicago Tribune "For 'A Wise Economist Asks a Question.'"
1933 H. M. Talburt The Washington Daily News "For 'The Light of Asia.'"
1934 Edmund Duffy The Baltimore Sun "For 'California Points with Pride!'"
1935 Ross A. Lewis Milwaukee Journal "For 'Sure, I'll Work for Both Sides.'"
1936 No award given.
1937 C. D. Batchelor New York Daily News "For 'Come on in, I'll treat you right. I used to know your Daddy.'"
1938 Vaughn Shoemaker Chicago Daily News "For 'The Road Back.'"
1939 Charles G. Werner Daily Oklahoman "For 'Nomination for 1938.'"
1940 Edmund Duffy The Baltimore Sun "For 'The Outstretched Hand.'"
1941 Jacob Burck Chicago Daily Times "For 'If I Should Die Before I Wake.'"
1942 Herbert Lawrence Block Newspaper Enterprise Association "For 'British Plane.'"
1943 Jay Norwood Darling Des Moines Register & Tribune "For 'What a Place For a Waste Paper Salvage Campaign.'"
1944 Clifford K. Berryman The Evening Star "For 'But Where Is the Boat Going?'"
1945 Sergeant Bill Mauldin United Feature Syndicate, Inc. "For distinguished service as a cartoonist, as exemplified by the cartoon entitled, 'Fresh, spirited American troops, flushed with victory, are bringing in thousands of hungry, ragged, battle-weary prisoners,' in the series entitled, 'Up Front With Mauldin.'"
1946 Bruce Alexander Russell Los Angeles Times "For 'Time to Bridge That Gulch.'"
1947 Vaughn Shoemaker Chicago Daily News "For his cartoon, 'Still Racing His Shadow.'"
1948 Reuben L. Goldberg New York Sun "For 'Peace Today.'"
1949 Lute Pease Newark Evening News "For 'Who Me?'"
1950 James T. Berryman The Evening Star "For 'All Set for a Super-Secret Session in Washington.'"
1951 Reg (Reginald W.) Manning Arizona Republic "For 'Hats.'"
1952 Fred L. Packer New York Mirror "For 'Your Editors Ought to Have More Sense Than to Print What I Say!'"
1953 Edward D. Kuekes Cleveland Plain Dealer "For 'Aftermath.'"
1954 Herbert L. Block (Herblock) The Washington Post & Times-Herald "For a cartoon depicting the robed figure of Death saying to Stalin after he died, 'You Were Always A Great Friend of Mine, Joseph.'"
1955 Daniel R. Fitzpatrick St. Louis Post-Dispatch "For a cartoon published on June 8, 1954 entitled, 'How Would Another Mistake Help?' showing Uncle Sam, bayoneted rifle in hand, pondering whether to wade into a black marsh bearing the legend 'French Mistakes in Indo-China.' The award is also given for distinguished body of the work of Mr. Fitzpatrick in both 1954 and his entire career."
1956 Robert York Louisville Times "For his cartoon, 'Achilles' showing a bulging figure of American prosperity tapering to a weak heel labeled 'Farm Prices.'"
1957 Tom Little The Nashville Tennessean "For 'Wonder Why My Parents Didn't Give Me Salk Shots?' Published on January 12, 1956."
1958 Bruce M. Shanks Buffalo Evening News "For 'The Thinker,' published on August 10, 1957, depicting the dilemma of union membership when confronted by racketeering leaders in some labor unions."
1959 William H. (Bill) Mauldin St. Louis Post-Dispatch "For 'I won the Nobel Prize for Literature. What was your crime?' Published on October 30, 1958."
1960 No award given.
1961 Carey Orr Chicago Tribune "For 'The Kindly Tiger,' published on October 8, 1960." Γ]
1962 Edmund S. Valtman The Hartford Times "For 'What You Need, Man, Is a Revolution Like Mine,' published on August 31, 1961."
1963 Frank Miller Des Moines Register "For a cartoon which showed a world destroyed with one ragged figure calling to another: 'I said we sure settled that dispute, didn't we!'"
1964 Paul Conrad The Denver Post "For his editorial cartooning during the past year"
1965 No award given.
1966 Don Wright The Miami News "For 'You Mean You Were Bluffing?'"
1967 Patrick B. Oliphant The Denver Post "For 'They Won't Get Us To The Conference Table. Will They?' Published February 1, 1966." Δ]
1968 Eugene Gray Payne The Charlotte Observer "For his editorial cartooning in 1967."
1969 John Fischetti Chicago Daily News "For his editorial cartooning in 1968."
1970 Thomas F. Darcy Newsday "For his editorial cartooning during 1969."
1971 Paul Conrad Los Angeles Times "For his editorial cartooning during 1970."
1972 Jeffrey K. MacNelly Richmond News-Leader "For his editorial cartooning during 1971."
1973 No award given.
1974 Paul Szep The Boston Globe "For his editorial cartooning during 1973."
1975 Garry Trudeau Universal Press Syndicate "For his cartoon strip Doonesbury."
1976 Tony Auth The Philadelphia Inquirer "For 'O beautiful for spacious skies, For amber waves of grain,' published on July 22, 1975." Ε]
1977 Paul Szep The Boston Globe
1978 Jeffrey K. MacNelly Richmond News Leader
1979 Herbert L. Block The Washington Post "For the body of his work."
1980 Don Wright The Miami News
1981 Mike Peters Dayton Daily News
1982 Ben Sargent Austin American-Statesman
1983 Richard Locher Chicago Tribune
1984 Paul Conrad Los Angeles Times
1985 Jeff MacNelly Chicago Tribune
1986 Jules Feiffer The Village Voice
1987 Berke Breathed The Washington Post Writers Group
1988 Doug Marlette The Atlanta Constitution and Charlotte Observer
1989 Jack Higgins Chicago Sun-Times
1990 Tom Toles The Buffalo News "For his work during the year as exemplified by the cartoon 'First Amendment.'" Ζ]
1991 Jim Borgman The Cincinnati Enquirer
1992 Signe Wilkinson The Philadelphia Daily News
1993 Stephen R. Benson The Arizona Republic
1994 Michael P. Ramirez Commercial Appeal "For his trenchant cartoons on contemporary issues."
1995 Mike Luckovich The Atlanta Constitution
1996 Jim Morin The Miami Herald
1997 Walt Handelsman Times-Picayune
1998 Stephen P. Breen Asbury Park Press
1999 David Horsey The Seattle Post-Intelligencer
2000 Joel Pett Lexington Herald-Leader
2001 Ann Telnaes Los Angeles Times Syndicate
2002 Clay Bennett The Christian Science Monitor
2003 David Horsey The Seattle Post-Intelligencer "For his perceptive cartoons executed with a distinctive style and sense of humor."
2004 Matt Davies The Journal News "For his piercing cartoons on an array of topics, drawn with a fresh, original style."
2005 Nick Anderson The Courier-Journal "For his unusual graphic style that produced extraordinarily thoughtful and powerful messages."
2006 Mike Luckovich The Atlanta Journal-Constitution "For his powerful cartoons on an array of issues, drawn with a simple but piercing style."
2007 Walt Handelsman Newsday "For his stark, sophisticated cartoons and his impressive use of zany animation."
2008 Michael Ramirez Investor's Business Daily "For his provocative cartoons that rely on originality, humor and detailed artistry."
2009 Steve Breen The San Diego Union-Tribune "For his agile use of a classic style to produce wide ranging cartoons that engage readers with power, clarity and humor."
2010 Mark Fiore Self-syndicated appearing on SFGate.com "For his animated cartoons appearing on SFGate.com, the San Francisco Chronicle Web site, where his biting wit, extensive research and ability to distill complex issues set a high standard for an emerging form of commentary."
2011 Mike Keefe The Denver Post "For his widely ranging cartoons that employ a loose, expressive style to send strong, witty messages."
2012 Matt Wuerker Politico "For his consistently fresh, funny cartoons, especially memorable for lampooning the partisan conflict that engulfed Washington."
2013 Steve Sack Star Tribune "For his diverse collection of cartoons, using an original style and clever ideas to drive home his unmistakable point of view."
2014 Kevin Siers The Charlotte Observer "For his thought provoking cartoons drawn with a sharp wit and bold artistic style."
2015 Adam Zyglis The Buffalo News "Who used strong images to connect with readers while conveying layers of meaning in a few words."
2016 Jack Ohman The Sacramento Bee "For cartoons that convey wry, rueful perspectives through sophisticated style that combines bold line work with subtle colors and textures."
2017 Jim Morin Miami Herald "For editorial cartoons that delivered sharp perspectives through flawless artistry, biting prose and crisp wit."
2018 Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan The New York Times "For an emotionally powerful series, told in graphic narrative form, that chronicled the daily struggles of a real-life family of refugees and its fear of deportation."
2019 Darrin Bell freelancer "For beautiful and daring editorial cartoons that took on issues affecting disenfranchised communities, calling out lies, hypocrisy and fraud in the political turmoil surrounding the Trump administration."
2020 Barry Blitt The New Yorker "For work that skewers the personalities and policies emanating from the Trump White House with deceptively sweet watercolor style and seemingly gentle caricatures."
2021 No award given.

Through 2017, eighteen people have won the Editorial Cartooning Pulitzer twice, and five of those have won it three times.

Name No. Years won
Rollin Kirby 3 1922, 1925, 1929
Edmund Duffy 3 1931, 1934, 1940
Herbert L. Block 3 1942, 1954, 1979 Η]
Paul Conrad 3 1964, 1971, 1984
Jeff MacNelly 3 1972, 1978, 1985
Jay Norwood Darling 2 1924, 1943
Daniel R. Fitzpatrick 2 1926, 1955
Nelson Harding 2 1927, 1928
Vaughn Shoemaker 2 1938, 1947
Bill Mauldin 2 1945, 1959
Don Wright 2 1966, 1980
Paul Szep 2 1974, 1977
Michael Ramirez 2 1994, 2008
Mike Luckovich 2 1995, 2006
Jim Morin 2 1996, 2017
Walt Handelsman 2 1997, 2007
Steve Breen 2 1998, 2009
David Horsey 2 1999, 2003

Nelson Harding is the only cartoonist to have won the prize in two consecutive years, 1927 and 1928. ΐ]


The Daily Cartoonist

Mike Peterson has weighed in with his and a few others opinions,
but the outrage is large and justifiable.

The major slight is to the nominated cartoonists of course, and we’ll return to them in a moment.
But let’s not forget the affront shown to this year’s jury.

Two Pulitzer Prize-winning Cartoonists, two Editorial Page Editors, and a Curator of Comics. This was arguably one of the most qualified juries in years, putting in a lot of time and effort for very little or no compensation to winnow the entries down to three excellent choices for The Board to pick. Their work, too, was snubbed.

Juror Signe Wilkinson expressed her thoughts about the three only getting participation ribbons:

Faced with 3 superb, uniquely talented cartoonists to choose from, the Pulitzer Prize board probably just couldn’t bring themselves to decide among them. S

Which strikes me as dripping with as much sarcasm as J.P.‘s comment here.

This morning Clay Jones devoted a cartoon and a column to the No-Prize:

This year, the announcement was delayed until June when it’s usually done in April. So, the anxiety for journalists is intensified and prolonged. The journalists waiting for this include political cartoonists.

After much waiting and anticipation, the Pulitzer Prize Committee slapped the entire profession of political cartooning in the face. Even for those cartoonists who didn’t enter, slappity slap slap. No prize for you. Can we have our entry fees returned? I mean, we entered because you gave us the impression there would be a winner. Even the Soup Nazi gave George Costanza a refund.

Yesterday, the Pulitzer people refused to give their annual award to a political cartoonist. Why? We don’t know.

For many more reactions from cartoonists and concerned citizens
scroll down the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists Twitter feed.

It seems that The Pulitzer Prizes, for this year at least, agree with The New York Times that
editorial cartoonists serve no purpose.


A Month of Pulitzer Prize Winning Cartoons - Day 9

I thought it would be an interesting look into our nation's political cartoon history if, this month, I took a look at a different editorial cartoon each day that won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Do note that we're talking basically 1922-1967 here, as since then, the Committee has awarded cartoonists generally for their work, not for an exemplary single cartoon. So in many ways, this is a snapshot of American politics (for better or for worse) over a forty-five year period. Here is an archive of the cartoons featured thus far.

Today we look at Jacob Burck's 1941 award-winning cartoon.

Jacob Burck was born in Poland in 1902. As a young boy in 1907, he and his family immigrated to the United States. As a young cartoonist, Burck was involved in various radical newspapers, including The New Masses and the Daily Worker, although Burck himself never actually became a Communist.

During the 1930s, he was actually hired (along with his artist wife) to paint a mural in Moscow on the behest of Stalin. Burck quit the project because Stalin interfered too much.

Years later, Burck's past associations would haunt him, along with the fact that his citizenship was never exactly totally settled, so during the 1950s, the government tried to deport him. Luckily, by this time, Burck has been working for the Chicago Sun-Times for many years (first at the Chicago Times and then he stayed on when the Times merged with the Chicago Sun in 1948 to become the Chicago Sun-Times) and the publisher of the Sun-Times threw his great financial weight behind his cartoonist, and Burck remained in the country.

Burck was still working for the Sun-Times in 1982 when he died in a house fire caused by his own smoking (he was 75 and in poor health, so when a lit cigar/cigarette caught fire to the house, he was unable to escape).

Burck won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning for this 1941 brilliant (and brutal) anti-war piece about life in war-torn Europe (one would think he's speaking more specifically about England, but if he is, it's never made evident) titled, "If I Should Die Before I Wake."

The classic children's prayer is:

Now I lay me down to sleep,I pray the Lord my soul to keepShould I die before I wake,I pray the Lord my soul to take.


A Month of Pulitzer Prize Winning Cartoons - Day 18

I thought it would be an interesting look into our nation's political cartoon history if, this month, I took a look at a different editorial cartoon each day that won the Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning. Do note that we're talking basically 1922-1967 here, as since then, the Committee has almost always awarded cartoonists generally for their work, not for an exemplary single cartoon. So in many ways, this is a snapshot of American politics (for better or for worse) over a forty-five year period. Here is an archive of the cartoons featured thus far.

Today we look at Edmund Duffy's 1934 award-winning cartoon.

I've already shown you folks Duffy's first Pulitzer Prize winning cartoon, and now, three years later, Duffy won his second (of a record-tying three total) with a pointed exhortation of the Governor of California.

One of the major issues that angered Duffy was lynching. Mostly, he complained about situations like the Ku Klux Klan lynching African-Americans, but unsurprisingly, the anti-lynching cartoon that Duffy actually won the Pulitzer Prize for was for a "white-on-white" crime that had an absolutely surreal feel to it that worked wonderfully for a lampoon.

Brook Hart was the son of a wealthy San Jose businessman, and Hart was quite popular in the area, known as one of the most eligible bachelors in the Bay Area. On November 9, 1933, he was kidnapped by two men, Thomas Harold Thurmond and John M. Holmes. They killed him that night and then asked for a $40,000 ransom.

After the two men had been arrested, the body was still missing. Agitated mobs of people roamed the streets. California Governor James Rolph was asked to bring in the National Guard. He repeatedly refused. In fact, he actually canceled a trip to a National Governors Meeting in Idaho because he was afraid that his chief political rival, the Lieutenant Governor, would call in the National Guard in his absence.

Finally, Hart's body was found. The mob (at least 5,000 people - some folks claim it was as many as 15,000 people) charged to where the two killers were held and lynched them in St. James Park on November 27th. Thousands of people gathered and after the lynching, people began tearing pieces from the lynching tree as souvenirs (the next month, the city ordered that the tree be cut down and destroyed).

Perhaps the most shocking aspect of this case was the Governor's response:

If anyone is arrested for this good job, I'll pardon them all. The aroused people of that fine city of San Jose were so enraged. it was only natural that peaceful and law abiding as they are, they should rise and mete out swift justice to these two murderers and kidnappers.

Rolph added that he would like to release all the kidnappers and murders in San Quentin and Folsom prisons and deliver them to the "patriotic San Jose citizens who know how to handle such a situation."

Such an absurd situation lends itself perfectly to mockery, and here is Edmund Duffy's response, in the November 28th edition of the Baltimore Sun, "California Points With Pride".

Strong condemnation by Duffy, and also perhaps a bit of a make-up for not awarding his past lynching cartoons.


Chicago Tribune Pulitzer Prizes

Throughout its history, the Chicago Tribune has received 27 Pulitzer Prizes for excellence in journalism.

E. Jason Wambsgans, Pulitzer Prize in feature photography for "a superb portrayal of a 10-year-old boy and his mother striving to put the boy's life back together after he survived a shooting in Chicago."

Mary Schmich, Pulitzer Prize in commentary for “her wide range of down-to-earth columns that reflect that character and capture the culture of her famed city.”

Chicago Tribune Staff, Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting for “its exposure of faulty governmental regulation of toys, car seats and cribs, resulting in the extensive recall of hazardous products and congressional action to tighten supervision.”

Julia Keller, Pulitzer Prize in feature reporting for “her poignant three-part series on a deadly tornado that struck Utica, Ill.”

Cornelia Grumman, Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing for “her powerful, challenging editorials on reform of the death penalty.”

2001 Pulitzer Prize

Chicago Tribune Staff, Pulitzer Prize in explanatory reporting for “"Gateway to Gridlock," a clear and compelling profile of the chaotic U.S. air traffic system.”

Paul Salopek, Pulitzer Prize in international reporting for “his reporting of the political strife and disease epidemics ravaging Africa, witnessed firsthand as he traveled, sometimes by canoe, through rebel-controlled regions of the Congo.”

Blair Kamin, Pulitzer Prize in criticism for “his coverage of city architecture, including an influential series supporting the development of Chicago's lakefront area.”


Watch the video: Pulitzer Prize-winning Cartoonist David Horsey Speaks on Political Cartoons