Anthony Murphy

Anthony Murphy

Anthony Murphy is a journalist, author, amateur photographer and astronomer, and father of five children from Drogheda in County Louth. He has been writing since an early age, and has studied the astronomy, archaeology and mythology of the Boyne Valley monuments for the past 15 years. A former newspaper editor, he lives just five miles from Newgrange. He wrote Island of the Setting Sun: In Search of Ireland’s Ancient Astronomers with Richard Moore, and more recently published Newgrange: Monument to Immortality in 2012 and contributed to an international collaborative work called The Mythology of Venus, published in 2013. Anthony has contributed to many newspapers and magazines on the myths and monuments of ancient Ireland, and has appeared in a number of television documentaries and films on the subject, including a recent appearance on The History Channel as a Newgrange expert.


    Anthony Murphy

    Using Duverger’s assertion that “first-past-the-post electoral systems will produce two major parties, eliminating smaller parties” (Orvis & Drogus, 2015: 705) as the premise for this response alongside an examination of an examination of Hefferman’s (2003) claim about Britain’s two-party power holding in practice, this essay will assess the impact that minor parties have on the dynamics of power play in British politics. The first part of the essay will use the Social Democratic Party (SDP) and their subsequent alliance with the Liberal Party as an empirical case study. With a widespread dissatisfaction with the incumbent Conservative government and an official opposition in disarray, it will look at how the SDP/Liberal Alliance gained support in its early inception and its subsequent evolution and influence. This example of reshaping British politics is particularly pertinent to the Labour party and its policy once Tony Blair became the party leader in July 1994. There will also be an empirical examination of the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) and how they have reshaped the contemporary policy of both the Conservative Party and Labour Party, particularly with the commitment to leaving the European Union.

    Whilst minor parties can and do influence direction British politics and electoral practice they normally campaign on a single issue and once some of their stated ideology has influenced government policy, they normally lose their voter power base. In May 2017, La République En Marche, led by Emmanuel Macron, took control of the Assemblée Nationale in France. La République En Marche as a party was only founded in April 2016. This essay will argue that due to the penchant that the British electorate have for a traditional and structured party political system, small parties have and will influence their policy making but Duverger’s Law will continue to prevail. Thus, it will only be governments formed by the Conservative or Labour party that will be dominant in Parliament. Evidence from the Electoral Reform Society (ERS) will be presented to show that what happened in France in 2017 will not be replicated in the United Kingdom (UK) under the present pluralist electoral system.

    Hefferman states that “while the two party system has clearly expanded to embrace additional parties, only the two major parties, Labour and Conservative, can form a single party government under Britain’s electoral system. That is why, at the same time as it can no longer be described as a classic two party system” (Hefferman, 2003)

    Complying with Heffereman’s theory was the pact between the Labour and the Liberal Party (colloquially known as the Lib/Lab pact) that James Callaghan’s Labour government agreed to in 1977. The Liberal Democrat’s also coalesced with the Conservatives in 2010, enabling David Cameron to become Prime Minister, however, the Liberal’s or the Liberal Democrats have not come close to forming a government since David Lloyd George left office in 1922, to be succeeded by Andrew Bonar Law. In March 1981 and with the UK’s political landscape undergoing its most dramatic change since 1945, the SDP was formed by four senior Gaitskellite Labour figures, who with the election of Michael Foot as Labour leader, were disillusioned with the ideological direction the party was taking. In a huge wave of publicity, Shirley Williams, Roy Jenkins, Dr David Owen and Bill Rodgers were soon joined by twenty eight other Labour MPs. For a time, the SDP thrived, performing well in by-elections and opinion polls” (Leach, 2015: 120) and by June 1981, joined the Liberal party in an electoral alliance that would last until 1988. The newly created SDP/Liberal alliance “rose rapidly in the polls, and for a time in late 1981 and early 1982, it was clearly leading the old major parties” (Denver & Garnett, 2014: 73). Feeling that they had optimised the cleavage of moderate Labour voters and one nation Conservatives, optimism was abundant as Liberal leader, David Steel told delegates at the 1981 Liberal conference in Llandudno to “go back to your constituencies and prepare for government” (Cole & Deighan, 2012: 141).

    For the 1983 General Election, Labour were electorally at their weakest position since 1945, fighting an election with a manifesto that Shadow Environment Secretary, Gerald Kaufman, called the “longest suicide note in history” (Bull, Landtsheer & Feldman, 2000: 3). Despite this mayhem within the Labour party, in parliamentary terms, the SDP/Liberal Alliance failed to capitalise on the turbulence within the main opposition, giving credence to Duverger’s and Heffereman’s theory. However, the voting figures indicated that “Labour polled 27.6 percent (8,456,934) of the vote, while the SDP/Liberal Alliance polled 25.4 percent (7,780,949) of the vote (Butler & Waller, 1983: pp 253-258). Whilst there was only a difference of 675,985 votes in favour of Labour over the SDP/Liberal Alliance nationally, the proportion of seats won by both parties was completely askew to the overall voting statistics for both parties. Labour won 209 to the 23 won by SDP/Liberal Alliance. The SDP/Liberal Alliance wanted to “breach the two party duopoly, then destroy it through proportional representation, and then inaugurate a new era in British politics” (Särlvik & Crewe, 1983: 339). With the combined amount of votes won by the SDP/Liberal Alliance in proportion to the Parliamentary seats gained compared to Labour, it is understandable that they were strongly in favour of the Proportional Representation (PR) model of parliamentary representation. The outcome of the 1983 General Election upheld Duverger’s theory that while “proportional representation tends to lead to the formation of many independent parties. The two party majority system to the formation of may parties that are allied with each other, the plurality rule tends to produce a two party system” (Duverger, 2000: 186). If PR was the parliamentary model, as opposed to the plurality one, the SDP/Liberal Alliance would have had many more than the 23 seats they won in 1983 and Labour far less than the 209 that they held.

    The 1987 General Election provided an even more disappointing outcome for the SDP/Liberal Alliance, as they won 22 seats and accrued 7,341,651 votes. This was a loss of 1,115,283 votes since 1983 and “after that election the two party alliance split” (Carman et al, 2015: 50), eventually merging to form the Social and Liberal Democrats in March 1988.

    With 5,999,606 votes and 20 seats won in the 1992 General Election, the Liberal Democrats electoral performance fell further in comparison to the SDP/Liberal Alliance five years prior. By 1997 the Liberal Democrat vote count declined even further, to 5,242,947, however with 46 seats won, the party gained 26 seats on their 1992 performance. Allowing for this statistical anomaly, the Liberal Democrat leader, Paddy Ashdown, had been engaged in private negotiations with Labour Leader, Tony Blair, over how the two parties could co-operate in a common cause (Foley, 2002: 121). In some ways, party policy of Labour and Liberal Democrats interweaved between 1992 and 1997 to such a degree that “since the election of Tony Blair as leader in 1994, the Liberal Democrats increasingly saw themselves as the most left wing of the mainstream parties” (King, 2011: 102). This is a classic example of how the proposed policies had influenced the newly pragmatically minded Labour leadership. Labour and Liberal Democrats demonstrated to voters that they were broadly connected. This led to voters of the respective parties extensively co-operating in 1997 to oust the Conservatives from office (Dunleavy, 2005: 515). Blair’s ideology was far more palatable to the Liberal Democrats that that of Michael Foot. With Foot’s anti EEC (forerunner of the EU) position being a significant factor in the formation of the SDP and with Blair being pro EU, it is unlikely that the SDP would have split from a Blair led Labour party, like they did when Foot was the leader. Blair’s success in the restructuring of Clause Four of the Labour party’s constitution, something that Hugh Gaitskell failed to do in 1959 (Cole & Deighan, 2012: 32) would also have been agreeable to the Gaitskellites that left Labour to form the SDP.

    Hennessy asserts that “Blair is the best Liberal Prime Minister has had since Lloyd George, but he does not lead the Liberal Party. Blair is a younger version of Roy Jenkins and all of Roy’s agenda items are Liberal ones” (Hennessy, 2002: pp 20-23). While it could be argued that Hugh Gaitskell’s moderate ideology had an influence on Blair, particularly on Clause Four, the stronger influence on Blair was Roy Jenkins, a man who Blair chose as his intellectual mentor (Bartle & King, 2005: 198). With Jenkins influence on Blair stronger than almost any of his predecessor’s and with Blair’s polling success at three consecutive general elections, it could be argued that in this instance minor parties helped reshape politics. However, the extent of Labour’s victory in 1997, 418 seats won when the threshold required was 326, this meant that there was no need for Labour to coalesce at all with the Liberal Democrats. Considering Blair’s consultations with Ashdown as well as Roy Jenkins profound influence on Blair, this is an example of minority parties reshaping British politics. However, Duverger’s Law came into play and the minor party had no influence once the election was won. The SDP may never have come close to winning any elections, but there is little doubt that over the long run, they influenced Labour party policy and indeed the rebranding of the Labour Party to ‘New Labour’ and thus eventually, government policy.

    Under the leadership of Neil Kinnock, the Labour Party’s position on EEC/EU came into harmony with the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats, as the previously Eurosceptic Labour leader had a Damascene conversion to the principle of the UK’s membership of the European Union (Leconte, 2010: 106). Thus, by 1993 there was no mainstream political party within the UK with a Eurosceptic ideology. Nature abhors a vacuum and this led to the formation of UKIP in 1993. “The original plan for UKIP had been to launch a pressure group that would influence other parties, not to build a disciplined fighting force that could take seats off the main parties” (Goodwin & Milazzo, 2015: 106).

    Whilst UKIP may have begun as a fringe party with a single identifiable policy, by 1999 they had won three seats in the European Parliament. By the 2005 General election, they had become “a formal political party, rendering anti-establishment and working class voters a peaceful democratic means of expressing their frustration with the direction of British society” (Gest, 2016: 189). In tandem with UKIP was the British National Party (BNP), who like UKIP were also attracting the cleavage of the “attracted alienated, young, white working class voters” (Jones, 2016: 127). However, whilst both the BNP and UKIP had relatively successful campaigns in the European elections in 2009, their successes were the result of a protest vote courtesy of disillusioned Labour and Conservative voters. Less than a year later in the 2010 General Election, the BNP won no parliamentary seats and received a total of 564,331 votes. However, whilst the BNP lost momentum after 2009, UKIP’s agenda, “urging voters to use May 22 nd 2014 as the EU referendum the other parties have denied you and vote UKIP to leave the EU” (Vasilopoulou, 2017: 66) resonated and in the 2014 European elections, they became the largest British party within the EU Parliament. As well as their stance on Britain’s membership of the EU, UKIP were also strongly in favour of reduced immigration to the UK. UKIP leader, Nigel Farage said “immigration was the number one issue for the electorate in all the opinion polls (Mason, 2015: 4 th paragraph)

    Ford and Goodwin indicate that “the unwritten law that angry insurgents rarely prosper in UK politics has been directly challenged. Since 2011, the UKIP’s revolt gathered serious momentum and was no longer confined to European elections” (Ford & Goodwin, 2014: 3). Recognising the popularity of UKIP’s rhetoric on immigration and Euroscepticism, David Cameron “introduced a pledge to reduce net migration In January 2010” (Boswell, 2018: 19) and for the 2015 General election campaign, promised an in/out referendum on EU membership should the Conservatives be returned to government. Under the leadership of Ed Milliband, the Labour Party also pledged a control on immigration in the 2015 campaign (Gaffney, 2017: 164). With both the Conservatives and Labour pledging controls on immigration, this was a clear sign of a minor party reshaping British politics by influencing the manifesto policy of the two main parties. This policy that would not have been introduced without the popular obvious support it had gained over the course of the minor party’s growth.

    The CEO of the Electoral Reform Society (ERS) said in the wake of the 2015 General Election that “Millions of voters are angry with a system that marginalises their views. Nearly half a million people signed petitions calling for electoral reform in the fortnight after the election” (Ghose, 2015: 1). Whilst there is little doubt that a significant amount of the demographic of traditional Conservative and Labour voters are disillusioned with their respective parties, there appears to be little appetite to change the voting system. As part of the deal which saw the Liberal Democrats coalesce with the Conservatives in May 2010, the Conservatives agreed to a Liberal Democrat demand for there to be a referendum on the Alternative Vote (AV) system, which took place exactly a year after the coalition took office. With a turnout of 42.0%, the opposition to AV prevailed, winning 67.9% of those votes cast (McGuinness, 2011: 1). With a total of 6,152,607 votes cast in favour of AV in 2011 (McGuinness, 2011: 4), Ghose was right to say millions of voters wanted a reform in the voting system. However, whilst six million people voted in favour of AV, the low turnout as well as the emphasis of victory in favour of keeping the voting system in the UK as it was, means that plurality the voting system in the UK is highly unlikely to change within the foreseeable future.

    Whilst the Liberal Democrats were in favour of PR, or its successor, the AV, it is perhaps ironic that the plurality voting system significantly benefited them in the 2015 General Election at the expense of UKIP. Overall, the Liberal Democrats held eight seats with a total vote count of 2,415,888, whilst UKIP won one seat with a total vote count of 3,881,129. With UKIP winning 1,465,241 more votes than the Liberal Democrats in the 2015 General Election, yet the Liberal Democrats winning eight parliamentary seats to UKIP’s one, it is obvious that UKIP would have returned more MP’s than the Liberal Democrats under a PR or AV voting system. In this instance, it is fair to argue that not only does plurality voting benefit the traditional duopoly of parties sharing power over a prolonged period, it also benefits the long standing third party as well.

    In summary, this essay has shown that both the SDP/Liberal Alliance (1983) and UKIP (2015) have been the victims of the plurality voting system which disproportionately favours the UK’s main parties. While they may have not have got their proportion of parliamentary representation, both parties have certainly helped to reshape British political discourse since their respective formations. New Labour under Tony Blair was, to all intents and purposes, the party Roy Jenkins wanted to create” (Assinder, 2003: 17 th paragraph). The affect that Roy Jenkins, the original SDP leader, had on Tony Blair and his unprecedented electoral success is thus testament to the eventual impact that the SDP as a minor party had on reshaping British politics.

    Whilst the SDP had a profound influence on the British Prime Minister between 1997/2007, UKIP have had and continue to enjoy an influence on the shaping of British politics. With the EU referendum of 2016, the Prime Minister allowed a vote that he would not have assigned without the influence of UKIP, the result of which would saw him announcing his resignation post haste once a suitable replacement had been found. With UKIP only receiving 594,068 votes in the 2017 General Election, a loss of 3,287,061 votes in two years and less than a year after satisfying their primary raison d’etre in the 2016 EU referendum, there is little doubt that their ideology survives in Westminster, even if their vote has declined dramatically. Even though the leaders of the two main pluralist parties were ostensibly against Brexit during the 2016 referendum campaign, both are committed to honouring the result and this is attestation to UKIP’s influence on shaping British political discourse.

    However, whilst both the SDP and UKIP have proved that minor parties can reshape British politics, the pluralist electoral system means that they and other minor political parties will never take power in the UK. The most popular policies of minor parties become adopted by the duopoly of the main political parties. The elections of 1983 and 2015 proved that the pluralist electoral system in the UK means that parliamentary seats are allocated predominantly between the two main parties, without any consideration for the proportion of votes cast for the respective parties contending the election. The elections of 1987 and 2017 demonstrated that once the minor parties had enjoyed a modicum of success or satisfied a main policy that they had originally formed over, they are ruthlessly forgotten about by voters. With the emphatic victory of the pluralist voting system over the AV system (as proposed by the Liberal Democrats) in the 2011 referendum, this is the way the voting system will stay in the UK for the foreseeable future. Ultimately, as the SDP and UKIP have proved, by either influencing an ambitious and pragmatic future leader of a main party or capturing the public’s imagination to a particular policy, minor parties can reshape British politics, they may occasionally hold the balance of power, but they never will be in power.

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    Bartle, John & King, Anthony Britain At The Polls (2005) London: Sage Publications

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    Murphy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

    Many of the oldest Irish surnames were originally in the Gaelic language native to Ireland. The original Gaelic form of the name Murphy is O Murchadha or Mac Murchadha, which are both derived from the word "murchadh," meaning "sea warrior."

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    Early Origins of the Murphy family

    The surname Murphy was first found in County Wexford (Irish: Loch Garman), founded by Vikings as Waesfjord, and located in Southeastern Ireland, in the province of Leinster, where they held a family seat from very early times.

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    Early History of the Murphy family

    This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Murphy research. Another 96 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1127, 1172, 1650, 1716 and 1798 are included under the topic Early Murphy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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    Murphy Spelling Variations

    Irish names were rarely spelled consistently in the Middle Ages. Spelling variations of the name Murphy dating from that time include Murphy, Morchoe, O'Murphy, Murfie, Murfree, Morfie, Morfey and many more.

    Early Notables of the Murphy family (pre 1700)

    Another 32 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Murphy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

    Murphy migration +

    Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

    Murphy Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
    • Abraham Murphy, who settled in Maryland in 1674
    • Abraham Murphy, who arrived in Maryland in 1674 [1]
    • Daniel Murphy, who settled in Maryland in 1678
    • Edmund Murphy, who arrived in Maryland in 1678 [1]
    • Howard Murphy, who landed in Maryland in 1678 [1]
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
    Murphy Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
    • Edward Murphy, who settled in Boston in 1766
    • Dennis Murphy, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1766
    • Eleanor Murphy, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1767 [1]
    • Ann Murphy, who settled in Philadelphia in 1773
    Murphy Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
    • Francis Murphy, who settled in New York in 1803
    • Arthur Murphy, who settled in Philadelphia in 1804
    • Arthur Murphy, aged 49, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1804 [1]
    • Philip Murphy, aged 22, who arrived in Maryland in 1812 [1]
    • Peter Murphy, who landed in Charleston, South Carolina in 1813 [1]
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
    Murphy Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

    Murphy migration to Canada +

    Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

    Murphy Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
    • James Murphy, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1750
    • Mr. Duke Murphy U.E. who settled in Westmoreland County, New Brunswick c. 1783 was a passenger aboard "Cyrus" on August 21, 1783 from New York to Saint John River [2]
    • Mrs. Elizabeth Murphy U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 was a passenger aboard "Cyrus" on August 21, 1783 from New York to Saint John River [2]
    • Mr. Luke Murphy U.E. who settled in Parr Town, Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1783 [2]
    • Mr. Timothy Murphy U.E. who settled in Home District [York County], Ontario c. 1784 [2]
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
    Murphy Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
    • Anne Murphy, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1803
    • Gerald Murphy, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1806
    • Bridget Murphy, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1831
    • Ellen Murphy, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1831
    • David Murphy, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1832
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

    Murphy migration to Australia +

    Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

    Murphy Settlers in Australia in the 18th Century
    • Mr. Hugh Murphy, (b. 1759), aged 34, irish baker who was convicted in Dundalk, County Louth, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Boddingtons" on 15th February 1793, arriving in New South Wales, Australia, he died in 1820 [3]
    • Mr. Patrick Murphy, (Edward), (b. 1762), aged 31, Irish convict who was convicted in Antrim, Ireland for 7 years for stealing, transported aboard the "Boddingtons" on 15th February 1793, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[3]
    Murphy Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
    • Miss Alice Murphy, (b. 1760), aged 53, Irish convict who was convicted in Dublin, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Catherine" on 8th December 1813, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[4]
    • Miss Alice Murphy, (b. 1796), aged 17, Irish servant who was convicted in Kilkenny, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Catherine" on 8th December 1813, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[4]
    • Miss Mary Murphy, (b. 1790), aged 23, Irish convict who was convicted in Cork, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Catherine" on 8th December 1813, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[4]
    • Miss Catherine Murphy, English convict who was convicted in Surrey, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Broxbournebury" in January 1814, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
    • Miss Norah Murphy, English convict who was convicted in Middlesex, England for life, transported aboard the "Broxbournebury" in January 1814, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

    Murphy migration to New Zealand +

    Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

    Murphy Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
    • Mr. John Murphy, Australian settler travelling from Hobart, Tasmania, Australia aboard the ship "Bee" arriving in New Zealand in 1831 [6]
    • Mr. Cornelius Murphy, Cornish settler travelling from Launceston, UK aboard the ship "Brazil Packet" arriving in New Zealand in 1836 [6]
    • Miss Mary Margaret Murphy, (b. 1820), aged 20, British sempstress travelling from England aboard the ship "Martha Ridgway" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 14th November 1840 [6]
    • Miss Partick Murphy, (b. 1814), aged 26, British labourer travelling from England aboard the ship "Martha Ridgway" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 14th November 1840 [6]
    • Mrs. Catherine Murphy, (b. 1816), aged 24, British settler travelling from England aboard the ship "Martha Ridgway" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand on 14th November 1840 [6]
    • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

    Contemporary Notables of the name Murphy (post 1700) +

    • Tom Murphy (1935-2018), Irish dramatist from County Galway, known for his work with the Abbey Theatre in Dublin and with Druid Theatre, Galway
    • Michael "Mick" Murphy (1940-2018), Irish hurler who played as a left wing-back for the Tipperary (1960-1964)
    • Richard Murphy (1927-2018), Anglo-Irish multiple award winning poet
    • Leo Murphy (1939-2017), Northern Irish Gaelic footballer
    • Frank Murphy (1947-2017), Irish silver medalist middle-distance runner at the 1969 European Athletics Championships
    • Eamon Gerard Murphy (1948-2013), Irish film, television and theatre actor, known for his work on Batman Begins (2005), Waterworld (1995) and Pumpgirl (2009)
    • Daryl Murphy (b. 1983), Irish footballer
    • George Walter Murphy (1963-2021), Canadian politician, Member of the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly for St. John's East (2011-2015)
    • Anne Frances Murphy (b. 1986), Canadian actress best known for her starring role as Alexis Rose in the CBC sitcom Schitt's Creek she garnered critical acclaim and won a Primetime Emmy Award, also receiving nominations for four Canadian Screen Awards, three Screen Actors Guild Awards, two Critics' Choice Television Awards, and one Golden Globe Award
    • Christopher Mark "CM" Murphy (1954-2021), Australian music and multimedia entrepreneur, band manager for INXS
    • . (Another 40 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

    Historic Events for the Murphy family +

    Empress of Ireland
    • Mr. William Bristow Murphy, British Trimmer from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [7]
    • Mr. Jack Murphy, British Assistant Steward from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [7]
    • Mr. Peter Murphy, British Leading Fireman from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [7]
    • Mr. John Murphy, British Quartermaster from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and survived the sinking [7]
    Halifax Explosion
    • Mrs. Eliza  Murphy (1857-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
    • Mr. Martin E.  Murphy (1860-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who survived the explosion but later died due to injuries [8]
    • Mr. John  Murphy (1862-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
    • Mr. Patrick  Murphy (1864-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
    • Mrs. Mary A.  Murphy (1870-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [8]
    • . (Another 7 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
    HMS Hood
    • Mr. Frank E Murphy (b. 1920), English Stoker 1st Class serving for the Royal Navy from Eastbourne, Sussex, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [9]
    HMS Prince of Wales
    • Mr. George Albert Murphy, British Gun Commander, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [10]
    HMS Repulse
    • Mr. Arthur Quirk Murphy (b. 1918), British Stoker 1st Class, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [11]
    • Mr. John Anthony Murphy (b. 1923), British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [11]
    HMS Royal Oak
    • Thomas Murphy (1919-1939), British Stoker 1st Class with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [12]
    • Peter Murphy (1922-1939), British Boy Signalman with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [12]
    Pan Am Flight 103 (Lockerbie)
    • Mary Geraldine Murphy (1937-1988), English Purser from Middlesex, England, who flew aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, known as the Lockerbie bombing in 1988 and died [13]
    RMS Lusitania
    • Mr. Dennis Murphy, English Fireman from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [14]
    • Mr. Matthew Murphy, Irish Fireman from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [14]
    • Mr. James Murphy, Irish Fireman from Swords, Dublin, Ireland, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [14]
    • Mr. John Henry Murphy, English First Waiter from Liverpool, England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [14]
    RMS Titanic
    • Miss Nora Murphy, aged 34, Irish Third Class passenger from Dublin who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and survived in the sinking in life boat 16 [15]
    • Miss Catherine "Kate" Murphy, aged 18, Irish Third Class passenger from Aghnacliffe, Longford who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and survived in the sinking in life boat 16 [15]
    • Miss Margaret Jane "Maggie/Mary" Murphy, aged 25, Irish Third Class passenger from Fostragh, Longford who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and survived in the sinking in life boat 16 [15]
    USS Arizona
    • Mr. Thomas J. Murphy Jr., American Storekeeper First Class from Virginia, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [16]
    • Mr. James Joseph Murphy, American Seaman First Class from Arizona, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [16]
    • Mr. James Palmer Murphy, American Fireman Third Class from Ohio, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [16]
    • Mr. Jessie Huell Murphy, American Seaman First Class from Louisiana, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [16]

    Related Stories +

    The Murphy Motto +

    The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

    Motto: Fortis et hospitalis
    Motto Translation: Brave and hospitable.


    Nicknames of U.S. crime figures

    The list of nicknames below is not restricted to members, leaders and associates of the American Mafia. Each nickname shown is generally linked with the named individuals by law enforcement authorities, press and/or underworld associates. (A number of underworld figures did not approve of their widely used nicknames and discouraged their use.) Skip ahead in the list by clicking on an index letter below.

    Action Jackson - William Jackson (among others)

    Al Brown - Giovanni Schillaci

    Allie Boy - Alex Rudaj, Alphonse Persico

    Anthony Black - Anthony Furino

    Artichoke King - Ciro Terranova

    Augie Pisano - Anthony Carfano

    The Animal - Charles DeLutro

    The Animal - Joseph Barboza

    Babe - N. Louis Triscaro, Louis Milo, George Tufanelli

    Bald Head - Sebastiano Bellanca

    The Barber - Ralph Daniello, Joseph LaBarbara

    The Baron - Nicholas Bonina

    Bayonne Joe - Joseph Zicarelli

    Ben Turpin - Philip Lombardo

    Benny Eggs - Benny Mangano

    Benny Squint - Philip Lombardo

    Benny the Bug - Benjamin Ross

    Benny the Bum - Benjamin DeMartino

    Big Carmine - Carmine Russo

    Big Jim - James Colosimo, James Balestrere

    Big Mike - Michael Panetti, Michael Polizzi

    Big Nose Nick - Nicholas Tolentino

    Big Paulie - Paul Castellano

    Big Trin - Dominick Trinchera

    Big Vinny - Vincent Terracciano

    Billy Jack - Vito Giacalone

    Black Bill - William Tocco

    Black Jim - James Colletti

    Black Leo - Leonardo Cellura

    Black Mike - Michael Galgano

    Black Tony - Tony Teramine

    Blackie - James T. Licavoli, Michael Galgano, Anthony Salerno

    Blondie - Giuseppe Simonelli

    Bobby Blanche - Nicholas Belangi

    Bobby Doyle - Girolamo Santucci

    Bobby Ha Ha - Robert Attanasio

    Bobby Phones - Robert Sanseverino

    The Brain - Arnold Rothstein

    Buck Jones - Steve Casertano

    The Builder - Joe Andriacchi

    Buster - Sebastiano Domingo, John Ardito, Sebastian Aloi, Sebastian Ofrica


    Baltimore: A Gangster History

    That’s how good of a television series The Wire was. After reading news reports about the deaths of two men who were an integral part of the HBO show, all one could think was: “No, not again!” I may be exaggerating, but The Wire was so good, so alive, that its characters felt like real people. So when the actual people involved with making the series pass away. It hits you.

    In the timespan of little over one month, the inspiration for stick-up king Omar Little and the actor who played the Machiavellian “Prop Joe” both left this world.

    Donnie Andrews was the real life inspiration for Omar. He spent his youth robbing Baltimore drug dealers with a .44 magnum, Slate.com reports. While serving a life sentence he met then journalist David Simon, who would go on to create The Wire. Just like Omar, Andrews, too, had a close relationship with the police. During his time behind bars he became one of the Baltimore Police Department’s best informants for all of the gang and drug-related activity in the city. It earned him an early release in 2005 after having served 17 years. He immediately joined the writing staff of The Wire and even starred in a small part as a member of Butchie’s crew.

    Donnie Andrews Andrews (right) died December 13, 2012, “following heart complications while in New York City where he was attending an event as part of his efforts to promote a non-profit outreach foundation. He was 58,” the Baltimore Sun reported.

    And then there was “Prop Joe”. The gang boss who could talk his way out of any lethal situation. Actor Robert F. Chew (below) gave his character a heart. Made him more than just another slick and devious gangster. The 52-year-old Baltimore actor and teacher made Proposition Joe one of television’s most iconic criminals. On January 17, he “died of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his home in Northeast Baltimore, according to Clarice Chew, his sister,” tthe Baltimore Sun reported.

    Baltimore and The Wire. Most people outside of the United States probably never heard of Baltimore before. After watching The Wire, however, they probably felt they knew the city through and through. But who were the real gangsters that served as inspiration for characters like Marlo, Avon Barksdale, and Stringer Bell? Which murders actually took place? Which politicians were corrupt?

    Puparo will start delving into B-more’s criminal history and give the readers of Gangsters Inc. a detailed rundown of the past and present of Baltimore’s gangland.

    BALTIMORE A.K.A. BODYMORE

    Television crime drama The Wire
    David Simon creator, producer and head writer of The Wire. Baltimore city detective Edward Burns is a producer and writer for HBO’s Baltimore based crime drama The Wire. Drug dealer Nathan Barksdale is dramatized in the HBO series The Wire just like Baltimore drug dealers “Little” Melvin Williams, Lamont “Chin” Farmer and Louis “Cookie” Savage.

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Donald Pomerleau served as Baltimore commissioner from 1966 till 1981

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    William Donald Schaeffer became mayor in 1971 and served till 1987

    Baltimore’s State Attorney Milton Allen started a special “Task Force on Narcotics” and in the team was Homicide investigator Stephen Tabeling

    Baltimore Frank Matthews main dealer Brother Carter
    Baltimore drug dealer John Edward “Liddy” (“Liddie”) Jones bought his drugs from Frank Matthews his Baltimore main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter (it was estimated that Carter provided 80% of the heroin market in Baltimore)

    bail bondsman and Maryland House of Delegates member James “Turk” Scott (43) killed
    13 July 1973 was bail bondsman and Maryland House of Delegates member James “Turk” Scott (43) shot and killed, he was under a federal indictment on charges of conspiracy to transport 40 pounds of heroin from new York to Baltimore

    Baltimore Frank Matthews main dealer Brother Carter
    In Baltimore was Frank Matthews main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter aka Bernard J. Lee and he got 5 December 1975 fifteen years

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    With the disappearance of Frank Matthews in the early 70ties and the conviction of Frank Matthews main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter in Baltimore the new drug boss became Maurice “Peanut” King

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson his enemy and rival is Maurice “Peanut” King

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson beat murder raps in 1974 and 1991

    Boston harbour based ILA Local 333
    Members Riker “Rocky” McKenzie, Kenneth “Kenny Bird” McKenzie and Milton Tillman Jr.

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Frank Battaglia served as Baltimore commissioner from 1981 till 1984

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Maurice “Peanut” King was in July 1981 shot in the foot

    Otis “Mike” Smith was in prison when his brother Howard Smith was shot and killed and Otis Smith became a witness against Maurice “peanut” King

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks was 1 April 1982 arrested for murder

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Maurice “Peanut” King, Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks, Clarence “Magic” Meredith, James Carter, Marcell “Black Barney” Moffat, Kerney “Wilco” Lindsey, Clinton Frisby, Stanley Rodgers and Beatrice Roberts (the girlfriend of Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks) stood on trial in 1982 and 1983

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    Walter Louis Ingram was spoken free from the January 1984 slaying of New York dealer Felix Gonzalez and with his was charged East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Bishop Robinson served as Baltimore commissioner from 1984 till 1987

    South Baltimore Westport area and West Baltimore Murphy Homes housing project was run by gang leader Timmirror Stanfield who stood on trial in a 1986 homicide investigation

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    Larry Donnell “Donnie” Andrews admitted to the August 1986 shooting of Boardley’s rival Spencer Downer at a bus stop in West Baltimore

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    In 1986 police arrested boxer Reggie Gross for the 12 September 1986 murder of Boardley gang member Andre Coxson

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    Larry Donnell “Donnie” Andrews and boxer Reggie Gross killed 23 September 1986 Rodney “Touche” Young and Zachary Roach

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Tilghman served as Baltimore commissioner from 1987 till 1989

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Clarence H Burns became mayor 26 January 1987 and served till December 1987

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Kurt L Schmoke became mayor in December 1987 and served till 7 December 1999

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Woods served as Baltimore commissioner from 1989 till 1993

    Warren “Black” Boardley (27) pleaded guilty to racketeering in June 1989 and was sentenced to 46 years

    Baltimore
    12 August 1989 was Sherman Chenault (26) shot and killed and police arrested later as suspect Kent Daniel Tillman.

    Elenora McCutcheon had as sons David Burley, Kevin Burley and Travis Wendell Burley who were all killed
    David Burley returned home from prison in March 1990. 10 June 1990 David Burley (24) was shot and killed in West Baltimore

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones and Darnell “Mookie” Jones killed in October 1994 Keith “Shugg” Westmoreland an East Baltimore drug dealer

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Thomas Frazier served as Baltimore commissioner from 1994 till 1999

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony “AJ” Jones had a war with his enemy East Baltimore dealer Elway Williams

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Jones had his men kill Elway’s partner Anthony Green in 1995

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Jones was shot in the arm 3 October 1995

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    5 October 1995 Elway man Raymund “Tupac” Harrison (Williams cousin) killed Jones right hand Deshane “Little Net” Carter as revenge for the murder of Anthony Green

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    25 January 1996 there was a shootout in which was involved Jett and Mark “Keedy” Coles (he was wounded) and killed was Coles friend Glen Wilson

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    26 February 1996 was Elway Williams chauffeur Derrick Rivers shot and killed and Elway Williams wounded when they were shot by Elway’s own men Alan “Wali” Chapman, Warren “Red Dog” Hill and Mark “Keedy” Coles.

    Darnell “Mookie” Jones
    Anthony Ayeni Jones step brother Darnell “Mookie” Jones killed 13 May 1996 Octavian Henry

    Elenora McCutcheon had as sons David Burley, Kevin Burley and Travis Wendell Burley who were all killed
    Kevin Burley (27) was shot and killed 24 August 1996 in a gun battle with an other man who was also killed

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 16 December 1996 murder of Dante Green

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 27 December 1996 attempted murder of Dennis Smith

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones ordered the murder of Angelo carter who was shot and wounded 16 February 1997

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones ordered the murder of his stepbrother John Jones (40) who was found killed 27 February 1997

    Baltimore
    Preacher crew member Derrick Hailstock was a New York drug dealer who confessed his role in nine murders testified against Anthony Ayeni Jones

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    They killed 11 June 1999 Kevin James (29)

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Martin J O’Malley became mayor 7 December 1999 and served till 17 January 2007

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Ronald Daniel served as Baltimore commissioner in 2000

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Norris served as Baltimore commissioner from 2000 till 2002

    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI)
    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI) was started in 2000 by Breezy Dayy (close associate of the Black Guerilla Family), Vally Lewis, Bryan Jordan and Perry Roark and it was closely allied to the Black Guerilla Family (BGF)

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Foster shot and killed 27 June 2000 Cortez Bailey “Man Man” (18) in retaliation for the shooting of a member of the West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    They killed in November 2000 North Avenue/ Harford Boys gang member Keith E. “Bone” Hamlet with whose gang they have a feud

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    In April 2001 was Hot Boys leader Leon Coleman shot and wounded

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    28 May 2001 people gather to remember North Avenue/ Harford Boys gang member Keith E. “Bone” Hamlet (who had been killed in November 2000) when they shot and killed Lakeisha Moten (24) the girlfriend of Shawn Henry the cousin of Hamlet

    Pasadena teen Crips leader Mark Anthony Miller killed
    A Glen Burnie gang that calls itself the Crips killed 7 August 2001 the Pasadena teen Crips leader Mark Anthony Miller (no relation to the real Crips)

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    16 August 2001 were killed Kevin A Pearson (19) and innocent bystander Michael C Hargrove (30) by Moses and taylor

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Lexington Terrace Boys members Michael Taylor and Keon Moses killed 23 September 2001 Gregory Spain (30) and Ronald Harris (23) and wounded Charles Brockington (22) in a robbery of drugs and money

    Baltimore
    Solothal Deandre Thomas “Itchy Man” shot and killed 2 October 2001 reformed drug dealer Jesse Williams.

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Michael Taylor would have killed 24 December 2001 Kiari Cromwell (23) and Derek Hamlin (24)

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    8 February 2002 Willie “Bo” Mitchell stabbed in Baltimore nightclub Hammerjacks a fellow drugsdealer in the back. Later that evening Mitchell himself was beaten up.

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    18 February 2002 Mitchell and Shelton Harris invited Oliver “Woody” McCaffity for a talk and he came and took with him his girlfriend Lisa brown and both were shot and killed by Mitchell and Harris. McCaffity was a friend of former heavy weight boxer champion Hasim Rahman.

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    24 March 2002 Mitchell, Shelton harris, Shelly Martin and Shwn Gardner murder then the brothers Darryl Wyche and Tony Wyche

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    Owned the company “Shake Down Entertainment Ltd” which had its own rap record label “Shystyville”

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Lexington Terrace Boys members Michael Taylor and Keon Moses killed 22 February 2002 potential witness Robert “Snoop” McManus (24).

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    The crew killed 21 March 2002 Vance Beasley the owner of a Baltimore recording company

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    1 April 2002 disappeared Travis Wendell Burley (19) and it is believed he was killed by the West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys . Two of Burley’s brothers had also been killed and their mother was McCutcheon

    7 June 2002 was Darius Spence wife Tanya shot and killed by Willie Montgomery and Shawn Gardner

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Kevin Clark served as Baltimore commissioner from 2003 till 2004

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 22 June 2003 murder of Marvin Nutter

    Special gang
    14 September 2003 they killed Kevin Harper

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Leonard Hamm served as Baltimore commissioner from 2004 till 2007

    Special gang
    13 October 2004 they killed James Wise

    Special gang
    10 September 2005 they killed Shannon Jemmison

    Special gang
    19 October 2005 they killed Michael Bryant and wounded John Dowery

    Special gang
    23 November 2006 they killed John Dowery

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Sheila Dixon became mayor 17 January 2007 and served till 4 February 2010

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Frederick Bealefeld III served as Baltimore commissioner from 2007 till 2012

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    29 November 2007 his kid brother Tywonde Jones (13) was stabbed to death by Tavon Burks (16) and Tyrone Walker (19) of the Bloods gang

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Tavon Burks was killed and Tyrone Walker wounded 11 March 2008 by Blood member Leroy “Kenny” Taylor

    Baltimore
    8 June 2008 was Pasadena Denver Lanes Bloods gang leader Kenneth Jones kidnapped and killed by rival Kedar Anderson of the Bounty Hunters Bloods known as the Spider Gang which is led by Dajuan Marshall

    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI)
    Perry Roark ordered the 2 June 2009 murder of Tony Geiger

    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach
    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach his gang murdered a man 4 September 2009. Their enemies are the Pasadena Denver Lanes Bloods

    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach
    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach his gang killed 11 September 2009 gang member Jerome Blackman

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor 4 February 2010 and served till now

    12 December 2010 was Club Pussy Cat stripper Cherrie Gammon (25) shot and killed because she was suspected of stealing drugs from her bosses in the McCants – Baker druggroup

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    27 April 2011 was Darian Kess (family of Robert Moore whose wife is Sarah Hooker whose brother is Donnie Adams) stabbed to death during a home invasion by three masked men.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    The next day Moore, Hooker and Adams shot and killed Alex Venable who they suspect and wound Thomas McNeil and Derrick Vaughn.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    7 June 2011 Robert Moore shot Veable relative Tavin baker.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    Alex Venable’s brother Allen Venable was shot 16 September 2011 by Anthony Roach.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    19 September 2011 was Edwin Willis shot.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    7 January 2012 was Derrick Vaughn shot

    Former Maurice “Peanut” King associate Gregory Parker killed
    19 March 2012 was Gregory Parker shot and killed , he had once worked for Clarence Meredith who was a partner of Maurice “Peanut” King

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Anthony Batts served as Baltimore commissioner from September 2012 till present

    Baltimore based Hells Angels mc
    Most of the members of Fates Assembly mc became members of the Baltimore Hells Angels

    Baltimore/ Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)

    For more of Puparo's texts check out his section at Gangsters Inc.


    Baltimore: A Gangster History

    That’s how good of a television series The Wire was. After reading news reports about the deaths of two men who were an integral part of the HBO show, all one could think was: “No, not again!” I may be exaggerating, but The Wire was so good, so alive, that its characters felt like real people. So when the actual people involved with making the series pass away. It hits you.

    In the timespan of little over one month, the inspiration for stick-up king Omar Little and the actor who played the Machiavellian “Prop Joe” both left this world.

    Donnie Andrews was the real life inspiration for Omar. He spent his youth robbing Baltimore drug dealers with a .44 magnum, Slate.com reports. While serving a life sentence he met then journalist David Simon, who would go on to create The Wire. Just like Omar, Andrews, too, had a close relationship with the police. During his time behind bars he became one of the Baltimore Police Department’s best informants for all of the gang and drug-related activity in the city. It earned him an early release in 2005 after having served 17 years. He immediately joined the writing staff of The Wire and even starred in a small part as a member of Butchie’s crew.

    Donnie Andrews Andrews (right) died December 13, 2012, “following heart complications while in New York City where he was attending an event as part of his efforts to promote a non-profit outreach foundation. He was 58,” the Baltimore Sun reported.

    And then there was “Prop Joe”. The gang boss who could talk his way out of any lethal situation. Actor Robert F. Chew (below) gave his character a heart. Made him more than just another slick and devious gangster. The 52-year-old Baltimore actor and teacher made Proposition Joe one of television’s most iconic criminals. On January 17, he “died of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his home in Northeast Baltimore, according to Clarice Chew, his sister,” tthe Baltimore Sun reported.

    Baltimore and The Wire. Most people outside of the United States probably never heard of Baltimore before. After watching The Wire, however, they probably felt they knew the city through and through. But who were the real gangsters that served as inspiration for characters like Marlo, Avon Barksdale, and Stringer Bell? Which murders actually took place? Which politicians were corrupt?

    Puparo will start delving into B-more’s criminal history and give the readers of Gangsters Inc. a detailed rundown of the past and present of Baltimore’s gangland.

    BALTIMORE A.K.A. BODYMORE

    Television crime drama The Wire
    David Simon creator, producer and head writer of The Wire. Baltimore city detective Edward Burns is a producer and writer for HBO’s Baltimore based crime drama The Wire. Drug dealer Nathan Barksdale is dramatized in the HBO series The Wire just like Baltimore drug dealers “Little” Melvin Williams, Lamont “Chin” Farmer and Louis “Cookie” Savage.

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Donald Pomerleau served as Baltimore commissioner from 1966 till 1981

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    William Donald Schaeffer became mayor in 1971 and served till 1987

    Baltimore’s State Attorney Milton Allen started a special “Task Force on Narcotics” and in the team was Homicide investigator Stephen Tabeling

    Baltimore Frank Matthews main dealer Brother Carter
    Baltimore drug dealer John Edward “Liddy” (“Liddie”) Jones bought his drugs from Frank Matthews his Baltimore main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter (it was estimated that Carter provided 80% of the heroin market in Baltimore)

    bail bondsman and Maryland House of Delegates member James “Turk” Scott (43) killed
    13 July 1973 was bail bondsman and Maryland House of Delegates member James “Turk” Scott (43) shot and killed, he was under a federal indictment on charges of conspiracy to transport 40 pounds of heroin from new York to Baltimore

    Baltimore Frank Matthews main dealer Brother Carter
    In Baltimore was Frank Matthews main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter aka Bernard J. Lee and he got 5 December 1975 fifteen years

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    With the disappearance of Frank Matthews in the early 70ties and the conviction of Frank Matthews main dealer James Wesley “Big Head Brother” Carter in Baltimore the new drug boss became Maurice “Peanut” King

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson his enemy and rival is Maurice “Peanut” King

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson beat murder raps in 1974 and 1991

    Boston harbour based ILA Local 333
    Members Riker “Rocky” McKenzie, Kenneth “Kenny Bird” McKenzie and Milton Tillman Jr.

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Frank Battaglia served as Baltimore commissioner from 1981 till 1984

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Maurice “Peanut” King was in July 1981 shot in the foot

    Otis “Mike” Smith was in prison when his brother Howard Smith was shot and killed and Otis Smith became a witness against Maurice “peanut” King

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks was 1 April 1982 arrested for murder

    Baltimore drug boss Maurice “Peanut” King
    Maurice “Peanut” King, Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks, Clarence “Magic” Meredith, James Carter, Marcell “Black Barney” Moffat, Kerney “Wilco” Lindsey, Clinton Frisby, Stanley Rodgers and Beatrice Roberts (the girlfriend of Thomas “Joe Dancer” Ricks) stood on trial in 1982 and 1983

    East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson
    Walter Louis Ingram was spoken free from the January 1984 slaying of New York dealer Felix Gonzalez and with his was charged East Baltimore based strip club Eldorado manager Kenneth Antonio “Kenny Bird” Jackson

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Bishop Robinson served as Baltimore commissioner from 1984 till 1987

    South Baltimore Westport area and West Baltimore Murphy Homes housing project was run by gang leader Timmirror Stanfield who stood on trial in a 1986 homicide investigation

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    Larry Donnell “Donnie” Andrews admitted to the August 1986 shooting of Boardley’s rival Spencer Downer at a bus stop in West Baltimore

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    In 1986 police arrested boxer Reggie Gross for the 12 September 1986 murder of Boardley gang member Andre Coxson

    West Baltimore based Boardley gang
    Larry Donnell “Donnie” Andrews and boxer Reggie Gross killed 23 September 1986 Rodney “Touche” Young and Zachary Roach

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Tilghman served as Baltimore commissioner from 1987 till 1989

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Clarence H Burns became mayor 26 January 1987 and served till December 1987

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Kurt L Schmoke became mayor in December 1987 and served till 7 December 1999

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Woods served as Baltimore commissioner from 1989 till 1993

    Warren “Black” Boardley (27) pleaded guilty to racketeering in June 1989 and was sentenced to 46 years

    Baltimore
    12 August 1989 was Sherman Chenault (26) shot and killed and police arrested later as suspect Kent Daniel Tillman.

    Elenora McCutcheon had as sons David Burley, Kevin Burley and Travis Wendell Burley who were all killed
    David Burley returned home from prison in March 1990. 10 June 1990 David Burley (24) was shot and killed in West Baltimore

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones and Darnell “Mookie” Jones killed in October 1994 Keith “Shugg” Westmoreland an East Baltimore drug dealer

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Thomas Frazier served as Baltimore commissioner from 1994 till 1999

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony “AJ” Jones had a war with his enemy East Baltimore dealer Elway Williams

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Jones had his men kill Elway’s partner Anthony Green in 1995

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Jones was shot in the arm 3 October 1995

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    5 October 1995 Elway man Raymund “Tupac” Harrison (Williams cousin) killed Jones right hand Deshane “Little Net” Carter as revenge for the murder of Anthony Green

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    25 January 1996 there was a shootout in which was involved Jett and Mark “Keedy” Coles (he was wounded) and killed was Coles friend Glen Wilson

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    26 February 1996 was Elway Williams chauffeur Derrick Rivers shot and killed and Elway Williams wounded when they were shot by Elway’s own men Alan “Wali” Chapman, Warren “Red Dog” Hill and Mark “Keedy” Coles.

    Darnell “Mookie” Jones
    Anthony Ayeni Jones step brother Darnell “Mookie” Jones killed 13 May 1996 Octavian Henry

    Elenora McCutcheon had as sons David Burley, Kevin Burley and Travis Wendell Burley who were all killed
    Kevin Burley (27) was shot and killed 24 August 1996 in a gun battle with an other man who was also killed

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 16 December 1996 murder of Dante Green

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 27 December 1996 attempted murder of Dennis Smith

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones ordered the murder of Angelo carter who was shot and wounded 16 February 1997

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones
    Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones ordered the murder of his stepbrother John Jones (40) who was found killed 27 February 1997

    Baltimore
    Preacher crew member Derrick Hailstock was a New York drug dealer who confessed his role in nine murders testified against Anthony Ayeni Jones

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    They killed 11 June 1999 Kevin James (29)

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Martin J O’Malley became mayor 7 December 1999 and served till 17 January 2007

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Ronald Daniel served as Baltimore commissioner in 2000

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Edward Norris served as Baltimore commissioner from 2000 till 2002

    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI)
    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI) was started in 2000 by Breezy Dayy (close associate of the Black Guerilla Family), Vally Lewis, Bryan Jordan and Perry Roark and it was closely allied to the Black Guerilla Family (BGF)

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Foster shot and killed 27 June 2000 Cortez Bailey “Man Man” (18) in retaliation for the shooting of a member of the West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    They killed in November 2000 North Avenue/ Harford Boys gang member Keith E. “Bone” Hamlet with whose gang they have a feud

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    In April 2001 was Hot Boys leader Leon Coleman shot and wounded

    East Baltimore based Hot Boys gang
    28 May 2001 people gather to remember North Avenue/ Harford Boys gang member Keith E. “Bone” Hamlet (who had been killed in November 2000) when they shot and killed Lakeisha Moten (24) the girlfriend of Shawn Henry the cousin of Hamlet

    Pasadena teen Crips leader Mark Anthony Miller killed
    A Glen Burnie gang that calls itself the Crips killed 7 August 2001 the Pasadena teen Crips leader Mark Anthony Miller (no relation to the real Crips)

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    16 August 2001 were killed Kevin A Pearson (19) and innocent bystander Michael C Hargrove (30) by Moses and taylor

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Lexington Terrace Boys members Michael Taylor and Keon Moses killed 23 September 2001 Gregory Spain (30) and Ronald Harris (23) and wounded Charles Brockington (22) in a robbery of drugs and money

    Baltimore
    Solothal Deandre Thomas “Itchy Man” shot and killed 2 October 2001 reformed drug dealer Jesse Williams.

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Michael Taylor would have killed 24 December 2001 Kiari Cromwell (23) and Derek Hamlin (24)

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    8 February 2002 Willie “Bo” Mitchell stabbed in Baltimore nightclub Hammerjacks a fellow drugsdealer in the back. Later that evening Mitchell himself was beaten up.

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    18 February 2002 Mitchell and Shelton Harris invited Oliver “Woody” McCaffity for a talk and he came and took with him his girlfriend Lisa brown and both were shot and killed by Mitchell and Harris. McCaffity was a friend of former heavy weight boxer champion Hasim Rahman.

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    24 March 2002 Mitchell, Shelton harris, Shelly Martin and Shwn Gardner murder then the brothers Darryl Wyche and Tony Wyche

    Willie “Bo” Mitchell
    Owned the company “Shake Down Entertainment Ltd” which had its own rap record label “Shystyville”

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    Lexington Terrace Boys members Michael Taylor and Keon Moses killed 22 February 2002 potential witness Robert “Snoop” McManus (24).

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    The crew killed 21 March 2002 Vance Beasley the owner of a Baltimore recording company

    West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys
    1 April 2002 disappeared Travis Wendell Burley (19) and it is believed he was killed by the West Baltimore based Lexington Terrace Boys . Two of Burley’s brothers had also been killed and their mother was McCutcheon

    7 June 2002 was Darius Spence wife Tanya shot and killed by Willie Montgomery and Shawn Gardner

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Kevin Clark served as Baltimore commissioner from 2003 till 2004

    North West Baltimore based Rice brothers
    The brothers Raeshio Rice and Howard Rice ordered the 22 June 2003 murder of Marvin Nutter

    Special gang
    14 September 2003 they killed Kevin Harper

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Leonard Hamm served as Baltimore commissioner from 2004 till 2007

    Special gang
    13 October 2004 they killed James Wise

    Special gang
    10 September 2005 they killed Shannon Jemmison

    Special gang
    19 October 2005 they killed Michael Bryant and wounded John Dowery

    Special gang
    23 November 2006 they killed John Dowery

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Sheila Dixon became mayor 17 January 2007 and served till 4 February 2010

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Frederick Bealefeld III served as Baltimore commissioner from 2007 till 2012

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    29 November 2007 his kid brother Tywonde Jones (13) was stabbed to death by Tavon Burks (16) and Tyrone Walker (19) of the Bloods gang

    East Baltimore drug lord Anthony Ayeni Jones “AJ”
    Tavon Burks was killed and Tyrone Walker wounded 11 March 2008 by Blood member Leroy “Kenny” Taylor

    Baltimore
    8 June 2008 was Pasadena Denver Lanes Bloods gang leader Kenneth Jones kidnapped and killed by rival Kedar Anderson of the Bounty Hunters Bloods known as the Spider Gang which is led by Dajuan Marshall

    Maryland prison gang Dead Man Inc (DMI)
    Perry Roark ordered the 2 June 2009 murder of Tony Geiger

    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach
    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach his gang murdered a man 4 September 2009. Their enemies are the Pasadena Denver Lanes Bloods

    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach
    South Side Brims leader Andre Ricardo Roach his gang killed 11 September 2009 gang member Jerome Blackman

    Baltimore Democrat Mayor
    Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor 4 February 2010 and served till now

    12 December 2010 was Club Pussy Cat stripper Cherrie Gammon (25) shot and killed because she was suspected of stealing drugs from her bosses in the McCants – Baker druggroup

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    27 April 2011 was Darian Kess (family of Robert Moore whose wife is Sarah Hooker whose brother is Donnie Adams) stabbed to death during a home invasion by three masked men.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    The next day Moore, Hooker and Adams shot and killed Alex Venable who they suspect and wound Thomas McNeil and Derrick Vaughn.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    7 June 2011 Robert Moore shot Veable relative Tavin baker.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    Alex Venable’s brother Allen Venable was shot 16 September 2011 by Anthony Roach.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    19 September 2011 was Edwin Willis shot.

    East Baltimore drug boss Robert Moore
    7 January 2012 was Derrick Vaughn shot

    Former Maurice “Peanut” King associate Gregory Parker killed
    19 March 2012 was Gregory Parker shot and killed , he had once worked for Clarence Meredith who was a partner of Maurice “Peanut” King

    Baltimore police commissioner
    Anthony Batts served as Baltimore commissioner from September 2012 till present

    Baltimore based Hells Angels mc
    Most of the members of Fates Assembly mc became members of the Baltimore Hells Angels

    Baltimore/ Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI)

    For more of Puparo's texts check out his section at Gangsters Inc.


    History of the Court – Timeline of the Justices – Frank W. Murphy, 1940-1949

    FRANK MURPHY was born on April 13, 1890, in Harbor Beach, Michigan. He was graduated from the University of Michigan in 1912 and University Law School in 1914. After his admission to the bar in 1914, Murphy clerked with a Detroit law firm for three years. In World War I, he served with the American forces in Europe and remained abroad after the War to pursue graduate studies in London and Dublin. In 1919, Murphy became Chief Assistant Attorney General for the Eastern District of Michigan, and from 1920 to 1923 he was engaged in private law practice. From 1923 to 1930, Murphy served on the Recorder’s Court of Detroit. He was elected Mayor of Detroit in 1930 and served for three years. President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Murphy Governor General of the Philippines in 1933. When the Philippines achieved independence in 1935, Murphy was named United States High Commissioner. After his return to the United States in 1936, Murphy was elected Governor of Michigan and served for two years. President Roosevelt appointed him Attorney General of the United States in 1939. One year later, on January 4, 1940, President Roosevelt nominated Murphy to the Supreme Court of the United States. The Senate confirmed the appointment on February 5, 1940. Murphy served on the Supreme Court for nine years. He died on July 19, 1949, at the age of fifty-nine.


    Audie Murphy, a Texas Hero Still Missing One Medal

    Audie Murphy, one of the most decorated soldiers of World War II, was awarded almost every ribbon and medal available. His name can be found on a commemorative postage stamp, a veterans’ hospital and even the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

    But Mr. Murphy’s home state has never bestowed its highest military award, the Texas Legislative Medal of Honor. And for the second time in two years, an effort to give him one has fizzled.

    Now family members and supporters are wondering if Mr. Murphy, who died in 1971, has been forgotten, along with other war veterans from what has been called the greatest generation.

    “I’m disappointed,” said Nadine Murphy Lokey, 82, Mr. Murphy’s only surviving sibling. “I think they had him in the history books at one time, but they’ve taken him out,” she said. If students do not learn about him “and people don’t talk about him, well, they forget.”

    Mr. Murphy received at least two dozen military decorations and awards, including the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star and several Purple Hearts.

    The son of poor tenant farmers from Hunt County, in northeast Texas, Mr. Murphy dropped out of school as a teenager to help his family make ends meet. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Mr. Murphy tried to enlist in the Marines but was rejected because at about 5 feet 7 inches tall and 130 pounds, he was deemed underweight.

    A sister helped him alter his birth record so he could enlist at age 17, and in June 1942 he was inducted into the United States Army, according to published biographies.

    Mr. Murphy’s daring exploits seem almost like a video game caricature. He is said to have killed more than 200 Nazis.

    One of his most heralded acts of bravery, cited when he received the Medal of Honor, occurred in January 1945 near Holtzwihr, France. Under withering attack, Mr. Murphy climbed atop a burning tank destroyer, commandeered a .50-caliber machine gun and held off an entire German infantry company as it desperately tried to take him out.

    Asked over a field telephone how close the Nazis were to him, he is said to have replied, “Just hold the phone and I’ll let you talk to one of the bastards.”

    Mr. Murphy killed about 50 Nazis in that battle and ultimately forced the company to withdraw.

    An eyewitness, Pfc. Anthony Abramski, later said: “I expected to see the whole damn tank destroyer blow up under him any minute. For an hour he held off the enemy force single-handed, fighting against impossible odds.”

    Private Abramski called it the “greatest display of guts and courage I have ever seen.”

    After the war, Mr. Murphy became an actor and produced or starred in dozens of movies, including “To Hell and Back” (1955), based on his best-selling autobiography.

    Mr. Murphy was one of the first veterans to speak openly about “battle fatigue,” now known as post-traumatic stress disorder, from which he suffered until he died in the crash of a small plane at age 45.

    Mr. Murphy had kept a foot in the military after World War II by joining the Texas Army National Guard. It was this final piece of his military career that made him eligible for the Texas Legislative Medal of Honor, an award that state lawmakers began presenting in 1997.

    A drive to win home-state recognition for Mr. Murphy, led by his family and fans, took off in 2011. But that year the medal was awarded, posthumously, to Roy Cisneros, a Marine corporal, for his bravery on the battlefield in Vietnam.

    At the time, state law allowed only one medal to be awarded every odd-numbered year — while the Legislature was gathered for its regular session — leading to a backlog of candidates in a state with an oversize military presence.

    This year, a bill allowing two people to receive the medal sailed through the Legislature. The legislation sets aside one award for actions that occurred between 1956 and the present, and another for actions before 1956.

    In May, the nominating committee that decides who can receive the award chose Mr. Murphy for the award set aside for older conflicts.

    “He is in a class all by himself,” said Senator Leticia Van de Putte, Democrat of San Antonio, author of the bill creating the two award opportunities and vice chairwoman of the committee that entered Mr. Murphy’s name into nomination last month. “When you read about Audie Murphy, you’re like — was he human?”

    But the opportunity to recognize Mr. Murphy fell through the cracks at the chaotic end of the regular session.

    Mr. Perry received the bill in his office on May 20, seven days before the Legislature adjourned. That meant there was time for Mr. Murphy to get the award, at least in theory. But that would have required Mr. Perry’s immediate signature of the bill creating two awards, plus a separate legislative resolution giving the second one to Mr. Murphy.

    Mr. Perry’s aides said he was never notified about the urgency of signing the bill, one of more than 1,200 he received this year. His signature came on June 14, more than two weeks after the session ended.

    “Awarding Audie Murphy the Legislative Medal of Honor is long overdue, and the governor was proud to sign this important legislation,” said Allison Castle, a spokeswoman for Mr. Perry. “Had we been notified about the urgency, we would have gladly expedited it.”

    Mr. Murphy is sure to be a strong contender to receive the award in the 2015 session, but Ms. Lokey, who recently had stents placed in her heart, is afraid she may not be around to see Texas honor her brother.

    “We don’t know about tomorrow,” said Ms. Lokey, who lives in Farmersville, a small town northeast of Dallas. “If I’m not here, somebody else will carry on.”


    Contents

    The Boston Irish Gang War started in 1961 and lasted until 1967. It was fought between the McLaughlin Gang of the Boston neighborhood of Charlestown, led by Bernie McLaughlin, and the Winter Hill Gang of Somerville, led by James "Buddy" McLean. [4]

    The two gangs had co-existed in relative peace for a number of years until an incident at Salisbury Beach on Labor Day weekend 1961. While at a party, Georgie McLaughlin made an advance on the girlfriend of Winter Hill Gang member Alexander Petricone, Jr. (who fled the Boston area during the war and became an actor under the name Alex Rocco). [5] McLaughlin was subsequently beaten unconscious by members of the Winter Hill Gang and was dumped outside the local hospital. [4] Bernie McLaughlin went to see "Buddy" McLean and demanded that he hand over the members of the gang who beat his brother. McLean refused. The McLaughlins took this refusal as an insult and attempted to wire a bomb to McLean's wife's car. In retaliation, McLean shot and killed McLaughlin coming out of the "Morning Glory" bar in Charlestown in October 1961. This was the start of Boston's Irish Gang War. [4]

    In 1965, McLean was shot and killed by one of the last survivors of the McLaughlin Gang, Steve Hughes. Howie Winter then assumed control of the Winter Hill Gang. One of the surviving McLaughlin brothers, nicknamed "Punchy", was shot while waiting for a bus in the West Roxbury section of Boston. A year later, in 1966, the last two associates of the McLaughlin Gang, brothers Connie and Steve Hughes were killed, allegedly by hitman Frank Salemme. By the time the war finally ended, more than 60 men had been murdered throughout Boston and the surrounding area.

    After the Irish Gang war, the Winter Hill Gang was reputed to be not only the top Irish Mob syndicate in the New England area, but along the entire east coast as well. In the book Black Mass by Dick Lehr and Gerard O'Neill, the authors make the unsubstantiated claim that the Winter Hill Gang were far more feared and powerful than their rivals, the Boston branch of the Patriarca crime family run by the Angiulo Brothers.

    During the 1970s, the gang's most prominent members were Howie Winter, John Martorano, James J. Bulger, Stephen Flemmi, Joseph McDonald and James Sims. The Winter Hill Gang was quite proficient at murdering rival mobsters in order to take over their rackets. But once they gained control, they had no idea how to run them. They learned the lesson of their gang's disastrous foray into gambling after wiping out Joseph (Indian Joe) Notranagelli's crew. In what should have been a fabulously profitable illicit gambling enterprise, the gang lost it. As the years went by, James Bulger and Stephen Flemmi lost interest in running any kind of gambling operation. They would eventually only provide protection for bookmakers, drug dealers and truck hijackers. By 1975, Howie Winter and John Martorano were going broke. Eventually they had to go to Patriarca family underboss Gennaro Angiulo to borrow money. To make the weekly payments, they began going into businesses with people they didn't know and couldn't trust. These activities included rigging horse races and drug trafficking.

    It was the decision to involve outsiders with their business that led to their downfall. By 1979, Howie Winter and the rest of the Somerville crew were all sent to prison for fixing horse races, leaving Whitey Bulger and Stephen Flemmi as the new leaders of the Winter Hill Gang. During the 1980s, Bulger's associates consisted of Kevin Weeks, Kevin O'Neil, Jim Mulvey and Patrick Nee. By 1991, even as James J. Bulger's criminal career was winding down, he remained the undisputed mob boss. His criminal associate Kevin Weeks was not considered a threat, and neither were Jim Mulvey, even though he suspected Bulger of being an FBI informant, Billy Shea, John Shea, Tim Connolly, Pat Linskey, Eddie MacKenzie, Paul "Polecat" Moore or John Cherry. Boston journalist Howie Carr commented, "They hadn't really been gangsters so much as they'd been ex-boxers and bar-room brawlers who had become cocaine dealers." One problem that arose with the gang was that they enjoyed partaking in their own vices. Like their customers, they spent afternoons in the fall drinking beer and watching professional football on television, often doubling up wagers on late West Coast games as they desperately tried to break even and chased their losses. Despite the above unsubstantiated claims of the gang's apparent inability to successfully run organised crime rackets, Bulger generated well over $25 million in racketeering proceeds alone throughout his criminal career, according to paperwork filed in federal court.

    In 1998, during a trial for racketeering and fixing horse races, Steve Flemmi and Whitey Bulger were revealed under disclosure to be FBI informants. Steve Flemmi and Whitey Bulger were implicated in many unlawful activities, including murder, but were never brought to justice due to their FBI handlers diverting their guilt onto others in the gang or various other gangs of the time. They were first handled by Special Agent H. Paul Rico and then later by SA John "Zip" Connolly. In addition to providing details on other gangs, Flemmi and Bulger relayed information on fellow members of the Winter Hill Gang to the FBI. When they had nothing to report, they would make up information to ensure that they were seen to be of high value to the agency. [6]

    Leaders Edit

    • 1955–1965: James "Buddy" McLean: Boss, killed 1965.
    • 1965–1978: Howard "Howie" Winter: Boss, jailed in 1978, released in 2002, died in 2020
    • 1978–1995: James "Whitey" Bulger: Boss, one of the most infamous Irish Mob bosses. Fled Boston in 1994 due to a pending federal indictment. He was on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted list until his arrest in Santa Monica, California on June 22, 2011. He had a $2 million bounty on his head. Killed in his cell at age 89 at USP Hazleton on October 30th 2018.
    • 1995–2000: Kevin Weeks: Boss, was Bulger's lieutenant, he was arrested on November 17, 1999 and became a cooperating witness in January 2000 released from federal prison on February 4, 2005, he wrote a book in 2006 entitled Brutal: The Untold Story of My Life Inside Whitey Bulger's Irish Mob

    Notable associates Edit

      : Whitey Bulger's partner who was also an FBI informant he was arrested in 1994 and is currently serving life in prison : was a high-ranking member and notorious contract killer, served twelve years in prison : former associate of Whitey Bulger and IRAgunrunner, served nine years in prison for armed robbery, he wrote a book in 2006 entitled A Criminal and an Irishman : former associate of Whitey Bulger, ran the drug trade in South Boston during the 1980s

    Ties to the FBI Edit

    John Connolly was an FBI agent who served as a handler for Bulger and Flemmi while they were informants. He leaked information about investigations targeting Bulger and Flemmi, which in several cases led to informants being murdered. He was convicted of racketeering in 2002 and sentenced to 10 years in prison. He was convicted of state charges of second-degree murder in Florida for the death of John Callahan in 2008 and sentenced to 40 years in prison.


    Watch the video: E Don Set Eddy Murphy Betrayed Mama Gladys This one Loud oo My People