USS Idaha BB-42 - History

USS Idaha BB-42 - History

USS Idaha BB-42

USS Idaho BB-42

Idaho IV

(BB-42: dp. 32,000 n. 1. 624', b. 97'5", dr. 30'; s. 21 k.;

cpl. 1,081; a. 12 14 ', 14 5", 4 3", 2 21" tt.; cl. New York)

The fourth Idaho (BB-42) was launched by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J., 30 June 1917; sponsored by Miss H. A. Limons, granddaughter of the Governor of Idaho; and commissioned 24 March 1919, Captain C. T. Vogelgesang in command.

Idaho sailed 13 April for shakedown training out of Guantanamo Bay, and after returning to New York received President Pessoa of Brazil for the voyage to Rio de Janeiro. Departing 6 July with her escort, the battleship arrived Rio 17 July 1919. From there she set course for the Panama Canal, arriving Monterey, Calif., in September to Join the Pacific Fleet. She joined other dreadnoughts in training exercises and reviews, including a Fleet Review by President Wilson 13 September 1919. In 1920 the battleship carried Secretary Daniels and the Secretary of the Interior on an inspection tour of Alaska.

Upon her return from Alaska 22 July 1920 Idaho took part in fleet maneuvers off the California coast and as far south as Chile. She continued this important training until 1925, taking part in numerous ceremonies on the West Coast during the interim. Idaho took part in the fleet review held by President Harding in Seattle shortly before his death in 1923. The battleship sailed 15 April 1925 for Hawaii,. participated in war games until 1 July, and then got underway for Samoa, Australia, and New Zealand. On the return voyage Idaho embarked gallant Comdr. John Rodgers and his seaplane crew after their attempt to fly to Hawaii, arriving San Francisco 24 September 1925.

For the next 6 years Idaho operated out of San Pedro on training and readiness operations off California and in the Caribbean. She sailed from San Pedro 7 September 1931 for the East Coast, entering Norfolk Navy Yard 30 September for modernization The veteran battleship received better armor, "blister" antisubmarine protection, better machinery. and tripod masts during this extensive overhaul, and was readied for many more years of useful naval service. After completion 9 October 1934 the ship conducted shakedown in the Caribbean before returning to her home port, San Pedro, 17 April 1935.

As war clouds gathered in the Pacific, the fleet increased the tempo of its training operations. Idaho carrier out fleet tactics and gunnery exercises regularly until arriving with the battle fleet at Pearl Harbor 1 July 1940. The ship sailed for Hampton Roads 6 June 1941 to perform Atlantic neutrality patrol, a vital part of U.S. policy in the early days of the European fighting. She moved to Iceland in September to protect American advance bases and was on station at Hvalfjordur when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941 and catapulted America into the war.

Idaho and sister ship Mississippi departed Iceland 2 days after Pearl Harbor to join the Pacific Fleet, and arrived San Francisco via Norfolk and the Panama Canal 31 January 1942. She conducted additional battle exercises in California waters and out of Pearl Harbor until October 1942, when she entered Puget Sound Navy Yard to be re gunned. Upon completion of this work Idaho again took part in battle exercises, and sailed 7 April 1943 for operations in the bleak Aleutians. There she was flagship of the bombardment and patrol force around Attu, where she gave gunfire support to the Army landings 11 May 1943. During the months that followed she concentrated on Riska, culminating in an assault 15 August. The Japanese were found to have evacuated the island in late July, thus abandoning their last foothold in the Aleutians.

Idaho returned to San Francisco 7 September 1943 to prepare for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. Moving to Pearl Harbor, she got underway with the assault fleet 10 November and arrived off Makin Atoll 20 November. She supported the fighting ashore with accurate gunfire support and antiaircraft fire, remaining in the Gilbert s until sailing for Pearl Harbor 5 December 1943.

Next on the Pacific timetable was the invasion of the Marshalls, and the veteran battleship arrived off Kwajalein early 31 January to soften up shore positions. Again she hurled tons of shells into Japanese positions until 5 February, when the outcome was one of certain victory. After replenishing at Majuro she bombarded other islands in the group, then moved to Ravieng, New Ireland, for a diversionary bombardment 20 March 1944.

Idaho returned to the New Hebrides 25 March, and after a short stay in Australia arrived Kwajalein with a group of escort carriers 8 June. From there the ships steamed to the Marianas where Idaho began a pre invasion bombardment of Saipan 14 June. With this brilliantly executed landing assault underway 15 June, the battleship moved to Guam for bombardment assignments. As the American fleet decimated Japanese carrier air power in the Battle of the Philippine Sea 19 to 21 June, Idaho protected the precious transport area and reserve troop convoys. After returning briefly to Eniwetok 28 June to 9 July the ship began pre invasion bombardment of Guam 12 July, and continued the devastating shelling until the main assault eight days later. As ground troops battled for the island, Idaho stood offshore providing vital fire support until anchoring at Eniwetok 2 August 1944.

The ship continued to Espiritu Santo and entered a floating dry dock 16 August for repairs to her "blisters." After landing rehearsals on Guadalcanal in early September, Idaho moved to Peleliu 12 September and began bombarding the island, needed as a staging base for the invasion of the Philippines. Despite the furious bombardment, Japanese entrenchments gave assault forces still opposition, and the battleship remained off Peleliu until 24 September providing the all important fire su port for advancing marines. She then sailed for Manue and eventually to Bremerton, Wash., where she arrived for needed repairs 22 October 1944. This was followed by battle practice off California.

Idaho's mighty guns were needed for the next giant amphibious assault on the way to Japan. She sailed from San Diego 20 January 1945 to join a battleship group to Pearl Harbor. After rehearsals she steamed from the Marianas 14 February for the invasion of Iwo Jima. As marines stormed ashore 19 February Idaho was again blasting enemy positions with her big guns. She remained off Iwo Jima until 7 March, when she got underway for Ulithi and the last of the great Pacific assault on Okinawa.

Idaho sailed 21 March 1945 as part of Rear Admiral Deyo's Gunfire and Covering Group and flagship of Bombardment Unit 4. She arrived offshore 25 March and began silencing enemy shore batteries and pounding installations. The landings began 1 April, and as the Japanese made a desperate attempt to drive the vast fleet away with suicide attacks, Idaho's gunners shot down numerous planes. In a massed attack 12 April the battleship shot down five kamikazes before suffering damage to her port blisters from a near-miss. After temporary repairs she sailed 20 April and arrived Guam five days later.

The veteran of so many of the landings of the Pacific quickly completed repairs and returned to Okinawa 22 May to resume fire support. Idaho remained until 20 June 1945 then sailed for battle maneuvers in Leyte Gulf until hostilities ceased 16 August 1945.

Idaho made her triumphal entry into Tokyo Bay with occupation troops 27 August, and witnessed the signing of the surrender on board Missouri 2 September. Four days later she began the long voyage to the East Coast of the United States, steaming via the Panama Canal to Norfolk l6 October 1945. She decommissioned 3 July 1946 and was placed in reserve until sold for scrap 24 November 1947 to Lipsett Inc., of New York City.

Idaho received seven battle stars for World War II service.


World War Photos

USS Idaho going through the Panama Canal in 1930s USS Idaho and USS Wasp October 1941 USS Idaho, LCVP and LVT Okinawa 1945 USS Idaho New York 1919
USS Idaho being repaired at Espiritu Santo 15 August 1944 USS Idaho 14” forward guns 2 USS Idaho 14” forward guns USS Idaho at New York Shipbuilding Corp 1919
USS Idaho anchored USS Idaho 5 April 1919 USS Idaho, stern 2 USS Idaho 3
USS Idaho with lattice masts Aerial view of USS Idaho 1926 USS Idaho port side Battleship USS Idaho, stern view 1935
USS Idaho (BB-42) in 1942 Battleship USS Idaho near Kwajelin 1944 USS Idaho Anchored in Hvaeldefjord Iceland October 1941 Battleship USS Idaho bombarding Iwo Jima February 1945
Battleship USS Idaho BB-42 USS Idaho during the bombardment of Okinawa 1 April 1945 Battleship USS Idaho following modernization 1934 Battleship USS Idaho bombarding Okinawa 1 April 1945, color photo
USS Idaho and USS Texas BB-35 photographed before the WW2 Battleships USS IDAHO BB-42 and USS NEW MEXICO BB-42, 1938 Battleship USS Idaho BB-42 1939 Bow view of Battleship USS Idaho BB-42
  • US Standard-type Battleships 1941-1945 (1): Nevada, Pennsylvania and New Mexico Classes – Osprey New Vanguard 220
  • Amerykanski pancernik Idaho – S. Brzezinski, Profile Morskie 68 (polish/english)
  • U.S. Battleships in Action, Part 1 – Robert C. Stern, Don Greer Squadron/Signal Publications Warships No. 3
  • U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History – Norman Friedman Naval Institute Press 1985
  • The Age of the Battleship 1890-1922
  • US Navy Dreadnoughts 1914-45 – Osprey New Vanguard 208
  • Battleships The First Big Guns, Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives (Images of War) – Philip Kaplan
  • Battleships – Peter Hore Lorenz Books 2005
  • Battleships: United States Battleships, 1935-1992 – Naval Institute Press 1995
  • Battleships: An Illustrated History of Their Impact – Stanley Sandler
  • All the World’s Battleships: 1906 to the Present – Ian Sturton Conway Maritime Press 2000

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IDAHO BB 42

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    New Mexico Class Battleship
    Keel Laid 20 January 1915 - Launched 30 June 1917

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


The Idaho‘s predecessor had a storied career

This submarine is not the first U.S. Navy vessel to be named the Idaho, however, as the name dates back to a WWI-era New Mexico-class battleship the USS Idaho (BB-42). That USS Idaho battleship displaced over 30,000 tons and carried twelve 14 inch guns.

The USS Idaho dressed with flags during the Naval Review off New York City, October 1912. (Photo Credit: Bureau of Ships Collection / U.S. National Archives, #19-N-62-2-1)

This ship, known as “The Big Spud,” had an incredible career, being completed during WWI and accepted into service in 1919. She spent much of the peaceful 1920s and 󈧢s participating in training, ceremonies, and exercises in the Pacific Fleet, and on a few occasions transported notable historical figures like the president of Brazil.

When WWII began in Europe, President Franklin D. Roosevelt began moving warships to protect U.S. supply ships heading for Europe. The Idaho was moved from the Pacific and provided support to shipping during the Battle of the Atlantic. It was during this time when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Luckily for the Idaho, she was stationed in Hvalfjörður, Iceland, when the attacks occurred.

With the U.S. now an active participant in the war, the Idaho rejoined the Pacific fleet and had her worn-out main guns replaced. The Idaho would spend the rest of the war assisting the island-hopping campaign in the Pacific, providing days-long naval bombardments of Japanese-held islands before U.S. troops would assault them. She also acted as an anti-aircraft platform to protect U.S. forces.

During the war, the Idaho provided fire support on the Gilbert and Marshall Islands, the Philippines campaign, and the islands of Peleliu, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. During the Battle of Okinawa, she shot down five kamikaze aircraft during a massed attack, but suffered a near miss from one, forcing her to undergo repairs before returning to the island and continuing her shelling.

After the Japanese surrender, the Idaho was docked in Tokyo Bay and witnessed the signing of the Japanese Instrument of Surrender. Just two years later, she would be cut up for scrap.

The new USS Idaho will operate silently below the waves instead, with her pump-jet pushing her along instead of a traditional propeller, to reduce the noise emitted from the vessel. Richard Colburn, the chairman of the USS Idaho Commissioning Committee, is currently raising money to fund the 2023 commissioning ceremony and hopes to make quality of life improvements for the crew.

Colburn says, “When you step on the submarine, we want it to look like Idaho and we want them to take part of Idaho with them.”


World War II [ edit | edit source ]

USS Idaho (BB-42) shells Okinawa on 1 April 1945. She could easily be distinguished from her sister ships by her tower foremast and 5-inch 38-caliber Mk 30 (127-mm) single gun turrets (visible between the barrels of the forward main turrets and starboard side of the ship, one of them facing forward) Idaho was the only battleship with this configuration.

Idaho and sister ship Mississippi departed Iceland two days after Pearl Harbor to join the Pacific Fleet, and arrived at San Francisco, California, via Norfolk, Virginia, and the Panama Canal on 31 January 1942. She conducted additional battle exercises in California waters and out of Pearl Harbor until October 1942, when she entered Puget Sound Navy Yard to be regunned. The original secondary battery of 5 in (130 mm)/51 cal guns was removed to make room for anti-aircraft machine guns. ΐ] Upon completion of this work, Idaho again took part in battle exercises, and sailed on 7 April 1943 for operations in the Aleutian Islands. There she was flagship of the bombardment and patrol force around Attu, where she gave gunfire support to the United States Army landings on 11 May. During the months that followed, she concentrated on Kiska, culminating in an assault on 15 August. The Japanese were found to have evacuated the island in late July, thus abandoning their last foothold in the Aleutians.

Idaho returned to San Francisco on 7 September to prepare for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. Moving to Pearl Harbor, she got underway with the assault fleet on 10 November and arrived off Makin Atoll on 20 November. She supported the fighting ashore with accurate gunfire support and antiaircraft fire, remaining in the Gilberts until sailing for Pearl Harbor on 5 December.

Next on the Pacific timetable was the invasion of the Marshall Islands, and the veteran battleship arrived off Kwajalein early on 31 January 1944 to soften up shore positions. Again, she hurled tons of shells into Japanese positions until 5 February, when the outcome was one of certain victory. After replenishing at Majuro, she bombarded other islands in the group, then moved to Kavieng, New Ireland for a diversionary bombardment on 20 March.

Idaho bombarding Okinawa in 1945.

Idaho returned to the New Hebrides on 25 March, and after a short stay in Australia arrived Kwajalein with a group of escort carriers on 8 June. From there, the ships steamed to the Marianas, where Idaho began a pre-invasion bombardment of Saipan on 14 June. With the landing assault underway on 15 June, the battleship moved to Guam for bombardment assignments. As the American fleet destroyed Japanese carrier air power in the Battle of the Philippine Sea from 19–21 June, Idaho protected the precious transport area and reserve convoys. After returning to Eniwetok from 28 June to 9 July, the ship began preinvasion bombardment of Guam on 12 July, and continued the devastating shelling until the main assault eight days later. As ground troops battled for the island, Idaho stood offshore providing vital support until anchoring at Eniwetok on 2 August.

The ship continued to Espiritu Santo and entered a floating dry dock on 15 August for repairs to her "blisters". After landing rehearsals on Guadalcanal in early September, Idaho moved to Peleliu on 12 September and began bombarding the island, needed as a staging base for the invasion of the Philippines. Despite the furious bombardment, Japanese entrenchments gave assault forces stiff opposition, and the battleship remained off Peleliu until 24 September providing the all-important fire support for advancing Marines. She then sailed for Manus and eventually to Bremerton, Washington, where she arrived for needed repairs on 22 October. The 5 in (130 mm)/25 cal guns were replaced by 10 5 in (130 mm)/38 cal guns in single enclosed mounts (she was the only ship of her class to receive this modification). ΐ] This was followed by battle practice off California.

Idaho' ' s mighty guns were needed for the next giant amphibious assault on the way to Japan. She sailed from San Diego on 20 January 1945 to join a battleship group at Pearl Harbor. After rehearsals, she steamed from the Marianas on 14 February for the invasion of Iwo Jima. As Marines stormed ashore on 19 February, Idaho was again blasting enemy positions with her big guns, and fired star shells at night to illuminate the battlefield. She remained off Iwo Jima until 7 March, when she underway for Ulithi and the last of the great Pacific assaults – Okinawa.

Idaho sailed on 21 March as part of Rear Admiral Deyo's Gunfire and Covering Group and flagship of Bombardment Unit 4. She arrived offshore on 25 March and began silencing enemy shore batteries and pounding installations. The landings began on 1 April, and as the Japanese made a desperate attempt to drive the vast fleet away with kamikaze attacks, Idaho ' s gunners shot down numerous planes. In a massed attack on 12 April, the battleship shot down five kamikazes before suffering damage to her port blisters from a near-miss. After temporary repairs, she sailed 20 April and arrived at Guam five days later.

The veteran of so many of the landings of the Pacific quickly completed repairs and returned to Okinawa on 22 May to resume fire support. Idaho remained until 20 June, then sailed for battle maneuvers in Leyte Gulf until hostilities ceased on 15 August.

Idaho made her triumphal entry into Tokyo Bay with occupation troops on 27 August, and was anchored there during the signing of the surrender onboard the Missouri on 2 September. Four days later she began the long voyage to the East Coast of the United States, steaming via the Panama Canal to arrive at Norfolk on 16 October. She decommissioned on 3 July 1946 and was placed in reserve until sold for scrap on 24 November 1947 to Lipsett, Incorporated, of New York City.


Mount/Turret Data

USS California BB-44 in 1945. Note the modern fire control equipment and mast-top radar antennas compared to the photograph on the previous page. USN Photograph. USS New Mexico BB-40 in December 1941. Note that the "40" on the turret roof has been painted over the life rafts. Detail from U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 19-N-27362. USS New Mexico BB-40 loading 14" (35.6 cm) HC shells in July 1944. Note turret rangefinders. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-K-14228. 14"/50 (35.6 cm) gun being salvaged from USS California BB-44 ca. February 1942. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 64487. New Mexico (BB-40) class Turret sketch from OP-1112. Image courtesy of HNSA. Tennessee (BB-43) class Turret sketch from OP-1112. Image courtesy of HNSA.

USS Idaha BB-42 - History

Dedicated to the Loving Memory of
Mack L. Roye, Lewis Davidson, & Don Seger

THE NAVAL GUN AT IWO JIMA CONFIDENTIAL U.S. NAVY FILM 26464


05.20.2021 - Passing of Ralph F. Bornhorst

I have some unfortunate news today. My father Ralph past away this morning . 99 years and 3 months old. He past peacefully and I will cherish the many years with him and the numerous USS Idaho stories!

I will send a more formal information when we get things together .. take care.

Per our previous chat, see attached a link for Ralph’s obituary. I also added a few photos that tell the story of his life .. we loved him dearly and always cherished his zest for life and and listening to his numerous stories of life as a sailor on the USS Idaho!

I am planning on attending the christening of the SSN Idaho submarine, if that is permitted, so please forward any information you may have when that event occurs.

Take care and I am grateful for all the work you have done for the sailors of the The Big Spud.

God bless you, America, and the crew of the USS Idaho!

02.10.2021 - Colburn Swarthout

Hello,
I found these pictures going through my grandfather's scrapbook. His name was Colburn Swarthout. He was a BMC when he left the ship. I'm not sure of the years but can find that information if you need it.

My grandfather passed away in 2017 at the ripe age of 97 and is entombed at Arlington. Grandpa had dementia but always contained fond memories of his life aboard the Idaho.



01.12.2021 - Photo Album of Crew Member, Edward Healey

Here are the pics I mentioned that my Grandmother had kept in that scrapbook (of Edward Healey).

There were too many of my Dad, so I just am sending generic ones. He must have sent her postcards as the Idaho traveled throughout the seas.

I think what you have done to keep the memory of the Idaho's memory alive is quite extraordinary and I really think it's great - So thank you - My dad would be so proud.

Sincerely,
Eileen Schmitt (Edward Healey's daughter)

Edward Healey - S1c
USS Idaho 1943 to 1945

01.11.2021 - USS Idaho Crew Member, Robert Charles Thilo

My father-in-law served on the USS Idaho during WW II but I don’t see his name on the list of crew members. His name is Robert C. Thilo, and he was from Sioux City, Iowa. He died in 1991, and I’m not sure what we need to do to prove that he served on the USS Idaho. His best friend Frank Post's name appears on the crew list. Bob Thilo also trained at Farragut.

I have attached a copy of a framed photo with certificates that we proudly hang in our home as some measure of proof. He also received the attached commemorative certificate which we found among family keepsakes. Will either of these attachments be helpful to add his name to the crew list?

We will keep looking for additional documentation.

Thanks for your help!
Sue Thilo

COMPANY 5019-44 - REGIMENT 2 - BATTTALION 8 - US NAVAL TRAINING CENTER - FARRAGUT, IDAHO
G. PIERCE SP.A2/C CO. CMDR - SEPT 29, 1944

Robert C. Thilo
Navy Training Course Certificate May 1945

Robert C. Thilo
Navy Training Course Certificate Oct 1945

09.01.2020 - Article: LTJG William Gardner by JOHN O'CONNELL ([email protected])

Senior Chief Machinist's Mate David Drury, front, stands Tuesday by the USS Nautilus, which was the first nuclear-powered submarine ever made. Drury, of Kooskia, prolonged his retirement for the chance to serve on a submarine named after his home state.

LTJG William Gardner was in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Idaho — a battleship nicknamed the "Queen of the Navy" — to witness Victory Over Japan Day on Aug. 15, 1945.

In addition to having a front-row seat for the ending of World War II, Gardner designed the desalinization plant for the world's first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus, and was part of its first sea trial.

The accomplished 100-year-old sailor, who lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, sent a letter wishing good fortunes to the next crew that will man a vessel to be named USS Idaho. The meaningful letter arrived on Aug. 24, the day of a symbolic keel laying ceremony for the U.S. Navy's future fast-attack nuclear submarine. It will be the fifth boat in the history of the nation's fleet to honor the Gem State.

[READ FULL ARTICLE]

Dedicated in Honor of Surviving Crew Members of the USS Idaho (B42):

William Gardner LTLG of Raleigh, NC - Age 100

Ralph F. Bornhorst F1c, of Sidney, Ohio. Age 98

Robert J. Diana EM1c of Georgia - Age 98

Samuel Funkner S1c(QM of Hanover PA - Age 94

Joe & Father Ralph F. Bornhorst (USS Idaho B-42 - 1945-1946)

Amy Diaine Scott and father, Robert J. Diana EM2C (USS Idaho B-42 - 1944-1946)


08.21.2020 - SEEKING LIVING CREW MEMBERS OF THE USS IDAHO

Richard Fife, LCDR USN (Ret)
Vice Chairman, USS IDAHO
Commissioning Foundation

Are any known crew members of BB42 still living?

If there are, can you assist with identification and location of those men? The Commissioning Committee would like to make mention of these service men at the laydown ceremony.

We will pursue recognition for all crewmen of BB42 and special announcement of those crew members still living.

If at all possible please respond back to me by Sunday, Aug 23rd with email to: [email protected]

A live stream of the commissioning ceremony can be seen at:

08.30.2020 - Douglas (Frenchy) Deneau

My grandfather was on the USS Idaho BB-42 from 08/1941 through 1943. Please add him to your crewlist. This is a photo of him and 2 other gentleman. - Mickey



Matthew S. Berletch Jr.
(USS Idaho B-42 ) S1c (1943-1945)


Dillonvale, Ohio -
Sep 3, 1927 – Oct 14, 2016

08.23.2020 - William Lawrence Alexander

Dear Sir,

My grandfather served on the USS Idaho from either 1921-25 or 1922-26. His name was William Lawrence Alexander and he was an electrician. I have requested his service record, but have not heard back from the U.S. Navy yet. He named my Mother after a girl he met in Austrailia on the 1925 Pacific Cruise. If you could please include his name in the ceremony, It would mean a lot to me and my family.

If you have any additional information about my grandfather's time on the Big Spud, I would appreciate it. I have compiled a large collection of original photos of the ship, including a 52" panoramic from 1927 of the ship going through the Panama Canal.

Best Regards,

Alexander Sink

.

04.30.2020 - Pete Domenico Forner

Hi Dave,

My name is Peter Dominic Forner, Jr. the son of Pete Domenico Forner. My father is deceased (11/14/2005) so I’m acting on his behalf to request his name be entered on the USS Idaho Crewman’s list. He served on the USS Idaho from July 31, 1942 – January 10, 1945 as a sailor first class. I have attached some documents to verify his service and time on the USS Idaho.

Thank you for tending to the history of the USS Idaho and all your time and effort that I’m sure it takes… If you need any additional information please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

Peter D. Forner Jr.

I have been watching YouTube videos of WWII actions, especially those in the Pacific as my father, Earl Albert Grigsby, was on the USS Idaho from its time in support of sinking the Bismark to after Okinawa. My Dad joined the Navy before Pearl Harbor and trained at the Great Lakes Naval Station. I believe that he joined the Idaho after it was in the Atlantic. I do not recall much of his stories, but he always showed a book (long since missing) of photographs of the Idaho and her crew. I believe he served on one of the anti-aircraft guns. He described his job as "operator-director". I do not recall his mentioning action at Guadalcanal, but he did mention the Aleutians, the Marshalls, the Marianas, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa. Sometime before the end of the war, he was transferred to the mainland with the Shore Patrol riding the trains that delivered returning sailors to their homes.

I found your ship roster does not include my Dad, and wanted to add his name to your record.

Thank you very much for your work in helping to remember the many, often unnamed, people who defended our country.

Sincerely,

Chuck Grigsby


Obsah

Kýl bol založený v lodeniciach New York Shipbuilding Compan v Camdene v štáte New Jersey januári 1915. Na vodu bola spustená 30. júna 1917 a US Navy si ju prevzala 24. marca 1919.

Pohon zabezpečovalo 9 kotlov Babcock & Wilcox , ktoré poháňali 4 turbíny ktoré na rozdiel od prvej jednotky New Mexico poháňali priamo štyri lodné skrutky s výsledným výkonom 27 500 ks, ktoré premieňali na maximálnu rýchlosť lode 21 u..

Bočný pancierový pás bol hrubý 279 – 203 mm. Paluba bola chránená 152,5 – 76,2 mm pásom. Hlavné delostrelectvo bolo uložené vo vežiach s hrúbkou panciera 457 – 228 mm sekundárne delostrelectvo malo pancierovanie 152 – 76 mm.

Hlavná výzbroj pozostávala z dvanástich diel kalibru 365 mm (14"/50 cal.) v štyroch trojhlavňových vežiach (dve vpredu, dve vzadu). Pomocnú výzbroj tvorilo 22 diel kalibru 127 mm (5"/51) uložených v kazematách po 11 na každej strane. V priebehu krátkeho času bolo odstránených 8 diel z najnižších kazemát, pretože sa táto pomocná výzbroj ukázala ako neefektívna (použiteľná len pri pokojnom mori). V tridsiatich rokoch bolo pridaných 8 x 127 mm (5"/25 cal.). Loď niesla dva 533 mm torpédomety.

13. apríla 1919 sa uskutočnili prvé tréningové plavby v zálive Guantanamo odtiaľ sa presunul k New Yorku, kde nalodil Prezidenta Brazílie Epitácio Pessoau na jeho ceste do Rio de Janeiro 6. júla. 17. júla sa už vrátila späť. Nato prešiel cez Panamský kanál do Monterey v Kalifornii a následne v septembri bola jednotka presunutá do stavu Pacifickej flotily. Zúčastnila sa cvičení a prehliadok včítane prehliadky flotily Prezidentom Woodrowom Wilsonom 13. septembra 1919. V roku 1920 viezol štátnych sekretárov (námorníctva a vnútra) Josephusa Danielsa a Franklina K. Lanea (Johna B. Paynea) na ich inšpekcii po Aliaške.

Po návrate z Aljašky 22. júla 1920 časť flotily manévrovala v oblasti Kalifornie a ďalej na juh pri Čile. Takéto intenzívne trénovanie pokračoval až do roku 1925 s krátkymi prestávkami. Napríklad v Seattly pozdravila Prezidenta Warrena Hardinga, krátko pred jeho smrťou v roku 1923.

Bojová loď sa od 15. apríla 1925 do 1. júla zúčastnila vojnových hier pri Havaji, načo navštívila Samou, Austráliu, a Nový Zéland. Z ciest sa vrátila 24. septembra 1925 a zakotila v San Franciscu v Kalifornii. Pričom na spiatočnej ceste stihla nalodiť Johna Rodgersa a jeho hydroplán po jeho pokuse preletu z USA na Havaj.

Nasledujúcich šesť rokov operovala Idaho zo základne San Pedro (Kalifornia), počas ktorých cvičila vpri pobreží Kalifornia a v Karibskom mori. 7. septembra 1931 vyplávala zo San Pedra a presunula sa na východné pobrežie USA.

30. septembra 1931 do 9. októbra 1934 podstúpila jednotka rozsiahlu (generálnu) prestavbu v lodeniciach Norfolk Navy Yard v Norfolku. Úpravy sa týkali pridania lepšieho pancieru, zosilnené boli aj podhladinové časti, kde boli pridané protitorpédové oddiely, lepšie strojné zariadenia, odstránené valcovité stožiare a prestavané nadstavby. To malo za následok zvýšenie výtlaku o 10 000 BRT a mierne rozšírenie plavidla. Po dokončení 9. októbra podstúpila konštrukčné skúšky v Karibiku, aby sa následne 17. apríla vrátila Idaho na svoju domovskú základňu San Pedro.

Po príchode do San Pedra sa venovala naďalej v cvičeniach a streľbách až do vypuknutia II. svetovej vojny v Európe načo sa presunula na Havaj ako časť bojovej flotily (1. jún 1940). Vzápätí však bola 6. júna prevelená na východné pobrežie do Atlantiku ako súčasť patrol USA. V septembri chránil Americkú predsunutú základňu na Islande s domovským prístavom vo fjorde Hvalfjordur. Až do 7. decembra 1941.

27. augusta 1945 bola súčasťou okupačných síl v Tokijskom zálive a 2. septembra bola pri podpise kapitulácie Japonska O štyri dni neskôr sa presunula Panamským kanálom na východné pobrežie do Norfolku, kde dorazila 19. októbra. Dňa 3. júla 1946 bola deaktivovaná a presunutá do zálohy. 24. novembra 1947 bola predaná do šrotu firme Lipsett, Incorporated, z New York City.


USS Idaho (BB-42)

Alus tilattiin Virginiasta Newport News Shipbuildingilta, missä köli laskettiin 5. huhtikuuta 1915. Alus laskettiin vesille 30. kesäkuuta 1917 ja otettiin palvelukseen 24. maaliskuuta 1919.

Palvelukseen oton jälkeen alus oli koulutettavana Guantanamo Bayn tukikohdassa Kuubassa. Koulutuksen päätyttyä alus palasi pohjoiseen. Alus teki kesäkuussa ja heinäkuussa laivastovierailut Rio de Janeiroon ennen syyskuista liittymistään Yhdysvaltain Tyynenmeren laivastoon. [1]

Aluksen kotisatamana oli San Pedro ja se kuului 4. taistelulaivaviirikköön. Alus oli 15. huhtikuuta – 24. syyskuuta 1925 Havaijin, Samoan, Australian ja Uuden Seelannin vesillä. Heinäkuussa 1931 alus liitettiin 1. taistelulaivaviirikköön, kunnes se siirrettiin 7. syyskuuta modernisoitavaksi Norfolkin laivastontelakalle. Alus oli modernisoinnin ajan nimellisesti liitettynä 2. taistelulaivaviirikköön. [1]

Alus palautettiin palvelukseen 9. lokakuuta 1934. Koeajojen ja kouluttautumisen jälkeen se palasi 17. huhtikuuta 1935 San Pedroon 3. taistelulaivaviirikköön, mistä alus siirtyi 1. huhtikuuta 1940 Pearl Harboriin Havaijille. Alus oli vuodesta 1936 alkaen viirikkönsä lippulaiva. Euroopan heikko tilanne 1941 pakotti aluksen siirtymään viirikkönsä mukana Atlantille, jossa viirikkö aloitti koskemattomuuden valvonnan. [1]

Alus lähti 6. kesäkuuta 1941 Pearl Harborista Hampton Roadiin ja heinäkuusta alkaen se partioi keskisellä Pohjois-Atlantilla suojanaan hävittäjät USS Morris ja USS Simms. Aluksen ollessa syyskuussa Task Force 15:ssä yhdessä kahden raskaan risteilijän ja viidentoista hävittäjän kanssa se suojasi joukkojenkuljetussaattueita Islantiin, minkä jälkeen alus oli jonkin aikaa sijoitettuna Hvalfjordissa ennen paluutaan lokakuun alussa Argentian lahdelle. [1]

Alus palasi vielä kerran marraskuun alkupuolella Hvalfjordiin Islantiin TG1.3:n mukana, kun oletettiin Saksan laivaston taistelulaiva Tirpitzin olevan merellä. Keisarillisen Japanin laivaston hyökätessä Pearl Harboriin Idaho oli edelleen Islannissa, mutta se aloitti kaksi päivää myöhemmin paluumatkansa Yhdysvaltoihin. Alus saapui San Franciscoon 31. tammikuuta 1942.

Vuoden lopun alus oli Yhdysvaltain länsirannikolla koulutuksessa sekä meriliikenteen valvontatehtävissä rannikon ja Pearl Harborin välillä. Alus liitettiin kesäkuussa uudelleen muodostettuun Task Force 1:een. Alus oli 14. lokakuuta – 28. joulukuuta huollettavana Puget Soundin laivastontelakalla. Koeajojen ja koulutuksen jälkeen alus palautettiin palvelukseen. [1]

Vuoden 1943 alun alus oli Kaliforniassa valmistautuen Aleuttien taisteluihin. Alus lähti 7. huhtikuuta Cold Bayhin Alaskaan osallistuakseen taisteluihin osana TG51.1:tä. Alus tulitti Attua 11. toukokuuta alkaen. Kiskan edustalla Idaho ja USS Mississippi sekä niiden tukena olleet risteilijät ja hävittäjät kävivät 27. heinäkuuta suuren tykistötaistelun. Tulituksen aiheutti tutkavirhe, jonka seurauksena harhamaaliin ammuttiin yli 500 kappaletta 14 tuuman ja saman verran 8 tuuman kranaatteja. Varsinaisessa maihinnousussa Kiskalle Idaho kuului 2.–15. elokuuta TG16.17:ään. [1]

Alus palasi 7. syyskuuta San Franciscoon, jossa se aloitti kouluttautumisen Gilbertsaarten taisteluita varten. Alus lähti Pearl Harboriin liittyäkseen TG52.2:een eli Makin saarten tulitukiryhmään. Alus lähti 10. marraskuuta Pearl Harborista maihinnousulaivaston mukana ja se saapui Makinin edustalle 20. marraskuuta aloittaen tulituksen, joka jatkui aina 5. joulukuuta saakka. Alus lähti samana päivänä paluumatkalle Pearl Harboriin. [2]

Alus liitettiin 1944 Marshallsaarten maihinnousun tulitukiosastoon TG52.8. Se avasi tulen Kwajaleinille 31. tammikuuta, missä se oli aina 5. helmikuuta saakka. Alus tulitti tämän jälkeen harhautukseksi Kaviengia Uudella Irlannilla 20. huhtikuuta, mistä se palasi Uusille Hebrideille ja edelleen Australiaan. Alus palasi Kwajaleinille saattuetukialusryhmän mukana 8. kesäkuuta valmistautuen Saipanin maihinnousuun. [3]

Mariaaneille alus lähti TG52.10:n mukana osallistuen tulivalmisteluun 14. kesäkuuta sekä maihinnousuun seuraavana päivänä. Alus lähti Guamille, jonka jälkeen se makasi ankkurissa Eniwetokilla 28. kesäkuuta – 9. heinäkuuta ennen 12. heinäkuuta aloitettua Guamin tulivalmistelua, joka kesti kuun loppuun. Alus palasi 2. elokuuta Eniwetokille. Aluksen seuraava operaatio oli Peleliun tulivalmistelu 12.–24. syyskuuta, jonka jälkeen se matkasi kotimaahan huollettavaksi. Alus saapui 22. lokakuuta Bremertoniin, josta se siirrettiin Puget Soundin laivastontelakalle. [3]

Alus palautettiin 1. tammikuuta 1945 palvelukseen. Alus lähti 20. tammikuuta San Diegoon ennen siirtymistään Pearl Harboriin ja edelleen Mariaaneille. Se osallistui Mariaaneille 14. helmikuuta saavuttuaan Iwo Jiman taisteluun (TF54), jonka tulivalmistelu aloitettiin 16. helmikuuta. Alus pysyi alueella, kunnes se lähti 7. maaliskuuta Ulithiin valmistautumaan Okinawan taisteluun. [3]

Alus liitettiin 21. maaliskuuta maihinnousun tulitukiosastossa TG54.4:ään. Aluksen piti aloitta tulivalmistelu 26. maaliskuuta ja jatkaa maajoukkojen tukemista aina 20. huhtikuuta saakka. Kamikaze osui aluksen viereen 12. maaliskuuta, joka aiheutti lievän vuodon. Alus siirtyi Guamille korjattavaksi palaten Okinawalle 22. toukokuuta, jossa se oli aina 20. kesäkuuta tapahtuneeseen Leytelle lähtöönsä saakka. [3]

Alus ei tämän jälkeen enää osallistunut taistelutoimiin, mutta se saapui 27. elokuuta Tokion lahdella ja oli siellä edelleen Japanin antautuessa. Alus lähti 6. syyskuuta kotimaahan ja se saapui Norfolkin laivastontelakalle 16. lokakuuta. Alus poistettiin palveluksesta 3. heinäkuuta 1946 ja riisuttiin varusteista 16. syyskuuta. Alus myytiin romutettavaksi 24. marraskuuta 1947 Lipsett Inc.:lle ja saapui 12. joulukuuta Newarkiin romutettavaksi. [3]