Combat of Hollabrunn, 15-16 November 1805

Combat of Hollabrunn, 15-16 November 1805

Combat of Hollabrunn, 15-16 November 1805

The combat of Hollabrunn (15-16 November 1805) was a delaying action fought by the Russian that helped prevent Napoleon from trapping Kutuzov's army before it could join up with another Russian army approaching from the north.

In the aftermath of Napoleon's triumph at Ulm (20 October), Kutuzov had been forced to retreat east along the southern side of the Danube. The Russians fought a successful rearguard action at Amstetten (5 November), and were across the Danube by the end of 9 November. The French were temporarily divided by the river, but the Russians failed to take advantage of a chance to crush Mortier's corps (battle of Durnstein, 11 November 1805). After this failure Kutuzov continued his movement to the north-east, towards a second Russian army commanded by General Buxhowden and accompanied by the Tsar.

In the meantime Murat occupied Vienna, and tricked the Austrian defenders of the Tabor Bridge into believing that an armistice had been signed for just long enough to allow his troops to capture the bridge intact.

Napoleon decided to try and trap Kutuzov just to the north-west of Vienna, taking advantage of the intact Tabor Bridge to move Murat and Lannes across the Danube. They would then head for Hollabrunn, hoping to arrive before the Russians. Further west Bernadotte was to cross the Danube at Melk, join up with Mortier who was already on the north bank of the river, and attack Kutuzov from the rear.

The plan failed on both flanks. Bernadotte was delayed at Melk, and didn't cross the Danube until 15 November. Meanwhile Kutuzov had already passed Hollabrunn, leaving Prince Peter Bagration, with a rearguard of around 7,500 men, to hold up the French. Bagration reached Hollabrunn on 15 November. He left an Austrian force under Count Nostitz as an advance guard in Hollabrunn, and then moved the bulk of his forces into a strong defensive position three miles to the north at Schongrabern.

The action at Hollabrunn began with a French attempt at trickery that rather backfired. When Murat arrived at Schongrabern he repeated the trick he had used at Vienna, claiming that an armistice had been agreed between the French and Austrians. He used his unopposed passage over the Danube as proof of his claim. Nostitz fell for the trick and withdrew from Hollabrunn.

Murat then advanced north towards Schongrabern, where he found Bagration. Mistakenly believing that he had found Kutuzov's main force (this was after all what he was attempting to achieve), Murat decided to try and repeat his trick. A messenger was sent to the Russians offering to negotiate an armistice. This time Bagration realised that this was a trick, but decided to take advantage of it. Any prolonged negotiations would give Kutuzov the time he needed to reach the Tsar and Buxhowden, and a second Russian army. Kutuzov agreed to the plan and sent two aides-de-camp to give the negotiations more credibility.

It isn't entirely clear what Murat hoped to achieve at this point. His role was to trap the Russians, allowing Napoleon to surround them. Instead he negotiated an armistice that would have allowed the Russians to leave Austrian territory while the French remained in Moravia. This might have been useful if the Austrians had indeed agreed to an armistice, but it's hard to see how it was meant to help in the actual circumstances. Napoleon was predictably furious when he learnt what Murat had done, and ordered him to break the armistice without the agreed four hours' notice.

Murat's ill-considered trickery cost the French a full day. The fighting at Schongrabern didn't begin until late in the afternoon of 16 November. The French began an artillery bombardment at 4pm, then attacked both Russian flanks. The attack on the right failed, but Lannes had more success on the Russian left, inflicting heavy casualties on two infantry and one cavalry regiment. Despite this setback the Russians managed to hold their ground until evening, when Bagration began a slow retreat. The Russians made another stand two miles further north, at Grund and Guntersdorf, where Bagration found some supporting troops. The fighting finally died down at about midnight. The Russians re-joined the main army, while the French camped around Hollabrunn. Bagration was rewarded for his performance with promotion to lieutenant general.

In terms of casualties the French could claim a victory. They lost around 1,500 men, while the Russians lost 1,479 killed or missing and 931 wounded. In terms of its actual impact the Russians had the advantage, delaying Napoleon's advance long enough to give their main army a lead that he was unable to overcome. Kutuzov was able to join up with the Tsar and Buxhowden, but the combined Austro-Russian army would soon march to defeat at Austerlitz (2 December 1805).

Napoleonic Home Page | Books on the Napoleonic Wars | Subject Index: Napoleonic Wars


Combat of Schöngrabern

The Combat of Schöngrabern was a relatively minor rearguard action fought by Austrian V Korps and supporting elements of the Kaiserlich-königliche Hauptarmee Hauptarmee under Prince Heinrich XV of Reuss-Plauen against elements of the French IV Corps of the Grande Armée d'Allemagne, under the command of Claude Legrand. Ώ]

The brief combat ended in favour of the French but Reuss did manage to delay the French sufficiently in order to prevent them from getting to the battle of Znaim on 10 July. Ώ]


Explorer Zebulon Pike killed in battle

After surviving two dangerous exploratory expeditions into uncharted areas of the West, Zebulon Pike dies during a battle in the War of 1812.

By the time he became a general in 1812, Pike had already faced many perilous situations. He joined the army when he was 15, and eventually took various military posts on the American frontier. In 1805, General James Wilkinson ordered Pike to lead 20 soldiers on a reconnaissance of the upper Mississippi River. Expecting to return before the rivers froze, Pike and his small band departed up the Mississippi in a 70-foot keelboat in early August. Slow progress, however, meant Pike and his men spent a hard winter near present-day Little Falls, Minnesota, before returning the following spring.

Less than three months later, Wilkinson ordered Pike to head west again. This time, Pike and his men explored the headwaters of the Arkansas River, a route that took them into Colorado. There, Pike saw the towering peak that now bears his name, and he made an ill-advised attempt to climb it. Grossly underestimating the height of the mountain and dressed only in thin cotton uniforms, Pike and his men struggled with deep snow and sub-zero temperatures before finally abandoning the ascent.


In September 1805 the Electorate of Bavaria under Prince-elector Maximilian I Joseph of Wittelsbach, that had been allied with the Habsburg Monarchy under the common federally structured Holy Roman Empire, went over to Napoleonic France: the Bavarian Minister Count Maximilian von Montgelas, realizing the French superiority while fearing the ambitions of the newly established Austrian Empire, signed a secret defence alliance at Bogenhausen. At the end of the War of the Third Coalition shortly afterwards, Bavaria found itself on the victorious side. Upon the 1805 Peace of Pressburg it not only was elevated to a kingdom, it also gained French-occupied Tyrol, which since 1363 had been held by the Austrian Habsburgs, who, heavily defeated by Napoleon at the Battle of Austerlitz, were forced to renounce it. The French officially handed over the Tyrolean county including the secularized Bishopric of Trent (Trentino) to Bavaria on February 11, 1806.

In its policies, the Bavarian government under Count Montgelas angered the Tyrolean population by raising taxes there, but at the same time barring exports, e.g. of cattle, from Tyrol into Bavaria. Furthermore, the state mingled into the affairs of the church in Tyrol, banning traditional rural holidays, the ringing of church bells, processions etc. which were a vital part of Tyrolean culture. Additionally, on May 1, 1808, the County of Tyrol was disestablished and administratively split up into the three districts of Inn, Eisack and Etsch. The new Bavarian constitution also replaced the old Tyrolean constitution that had given privileges to the population, such as not having to fight in a foreign army and outside the Tyrolean borders. Conscription was thus introduced in Tyrol and Tyroleans called into Bavarian military service, which led to open revolt.

The trigger for the outbreak of the uprising was the flight to Innsbruck of young men that were due to be called into the Bavarian army by the authorities at Axams on March 12 and 13, 1809. The partisans stayed in contact with the Austrian court in Vienna by their conduit Baron Joseph Hormayr, an Innsbruck-born Hofrat and close friend of Archduke John of Austria. The Austrian Empire, citing a breach of the conditions agreed in the Peace of Pressburg guaranteeing Tyrolean constitutional autonomy, declared war on the Bavarian-French allies on April 9, 1809. Archduke John explicitly stated that Bavaria had forfeit all rights to Tyrol, which rightfully belonged with the Austrian lands, and therefore any resistance against Bavarian occupation would be legitimate.

An Austrian corps under General Johann Gabriel Chasteler de Courcelles operating from Carinthia occupied Lienz and marched against Innsbruck, but was defeated by Bavarian troops led by French Marshal François Joseph Lefebvre near Wörgl on 13 May. Meanwhile, an irregular army led by the innkeeper Andreas Hofer upon the war message had gathered around Sterzing and marched north towards the Brenner Pass. In the First and Second Battle of Bergisel near Innsbruck on April 12 and 25 May, the peasant troops clashed with the Bavarians, who were forced to retreat.

The Tyroleans celebrated the news that Napoleon had suffered his a defeat at the Battle of Aspern-Essling on 22 May. Nevertheless, after the French again gained the upper hand at the Battle of Wagram on July 5/6, Archduke Charles of Austria signed the Armistice of Znaim whereafter the Austrian forces withdraw from Tyrol. Thus, the rebels, who had their strongholds in Southern Tyrol, were left fighting alone. They however were able to inflict several defeats to the French and Bavarians forces under Marshal Lefebvre in July, culminating in a complete French retreat after the Third Battle of Bergisel on August 12/13. Hofer now took over the administration of the unoccupied territories at Innsbruck large parts of Tyrol enjoyed a brief period of independence.

However, in the Treaty of Schönbrunn of October 14, the peace treaty ending the War of the Fifth Coalition, Emperor Francis I of Austria officially gave up any claims to Tyrol. Napoleon ordered the re-conquest of the province the same day. A combination of French military force under the new command of General Jean-Baptiste Drouet and diplomatic de-escalation measures by the rather pro-Tyrolean and anti-Napoleonic Bavarian commander, Prince Ludwig I, was successful in decreasing the numbers of rebel troops that were ready to fight to the death. Those last loyal troops were defeated at the Fourth Battle of Bergisel on November 1, that effectively crushed the rebellion despite minor rebel victories later in November.

Many of the rebels were executed by the French and Bavarian forces in the following weeks. The leader Andreas Hofer fled into the mountains and hid at several places in South Tyrol. He was betrayed by a Tyrolean peasant to the French near St Martin in Passeier on January 28, 1810. Hofer was arrested and brought to Mantua, where Eugène de Beauharnais, the French viceroy of Italy, first wanted to pardon him, but was overruled by his stepfather Napoleon. The death penalty was issued on February 19 and executed the next day. Hofer's mortal remains were buried at the Innsbruck Hofkirche in 1823.

In consequence of the insurrection, Bavaria pressured by the French on February 28, 1810 had to cede large parts of Southern Tyrol with the Trentino to Italy and the eastern Hochpustertal with Lienz to the Illyrian Provinces. Upon Napoleon's fall in 1814 and the Congress of Vienna, all parts of Tyrol were re-united under Austrian rule.

With the rise of nationalism in the 19th century, the tragic fate of the rebellion and of Andreas Hofer became a national myth especially for the German speaking Tyroleans. The song Zu Mantua in Banden deals with the death of Hofer and his vain resistance against the "foreign" occupants. It became the anthem of the Austrian State of Tyrol in 1948. Hofer's life and death was the model for the 1923 film Der Rebell by Luis Trenker.


Historical Events on November 16

    An auto de fe, held in the Brasero de la Dehesa outside of Ávila, concludes the case of the Holy Child of La Guardia with the public execution of several Jewish and converso suspects. City of Havana moved to its current location to avoid mosquito infestations

Victory in Battle

1532 Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro captures Inca Emperor Atahualpa after a surprise ambush at Cajamarca in the Peruvian Andes

    Troops under Don Frederik (the Spanish General Fadrique Alvarez de Toledo) occupy and plunder Zutphen, Netherlands

Ivan the Terrible Kills His Son

1581 Tsar Ivan the Terrible attacks his son and heir, Ivan Ivanovich, with a scepter after an argument leading to the latter's death three days later

Victory in Battle

1632 Battle of Lützen: Significant battle of Thirty Years' War - Swedish and Saxon forces defeat the Holy Roman Empire, at cost of the death of Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus

Event of Interest

1669 French state funeral for Henrietta Maria, princess of France, widow of English King Charles I, at St Denis with famous oration by Bishop Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet

    1st colonial prison organized in Nantucket, Massachusetts French troops occupy Freiburg Monarch of Brandenburg becomes king of Prussia English journalist John Wilkes injured in a duel Native Americans surrender to British in Indian War of Chief Pontiac West Indian Company & Amsterdam divide up Suriname 1st gun salute for an American warship in a foreign port - US Andrew Doria at Fort St Eustatius (Dutch Caribbean isalnd)

Historic Publication

1835 Extracts from Letters to Henslow, a collection of letters written by Charles Darwin during his voyage on the Beagle, is published

    New Zealand officially becomes a British colony Life preservers made of cork are patented by Napoleon Guerin (NYC) Russian court sentences Fyodor Dostoevsky to death for anti-government activities linked to a radical intellectual group his sentence is later commuted to hard labor Amsterdam post office at Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal opens Aleksandr Ostrovsky's play "Groza" (The Storm) premieres in Moscow Battle of Campbell's Station TN, 492 causalities Confederate retreat at Lovejoy, Georgia Spanish Parliament, "the Cortes" formally elects Italian Prince Amedeo Ferdinando Maria as King Amadeo I of Spain National Rifle Association is first chartered in the State of New York Battle of Gundet: Ethiopian emperor Yohannes beats Egyptians William Bonwill, patents dental mallet to impact gold into cavities British gunboat HMS Flirt fires at & destroys Abari village in Niger 6,000 Armenians massacred by Turks in Kurdistan French captain Henri Decoeurs troops reach Nikki, West Africa

Event of Interest

1916 Eugene O'Neill's "Bound East for Cardiff" premieres in NYC

    I. Berlin, V. Herbert, H. Blossoms musical premieres in NYC Russian La Satannaya ammunition factory explodes, killing 1,000 British occupy Tel Aviv and Jaffa Hungarian People's Republic declared Admiral Miklós Horthy, head of the Hungarian National Army, seizes Budapest and will later become regent of the restored Kingdom of Hungary Australia's Qantas airways founded in Winton, Queensland as Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Limited 1st postage stamp meter is set in Stamford Conn

Event of Interest

1922 Pope Pius XI calls on Belgian people to unite

End of the Ottoman Empire

1922 Ottoman Caliph, Sultan Mehmed VI asks the British army for help

The last Ottoman sultan, Mehmed VI, departs his palace in Istanbul after the abolition of the monarchy
    Cleveland Bulldogs (formerly Canton) lose to Frankford Yellowjackets, ends 31-game undefeated streak (NFL & major-league football record) American Association for Advancement of Atheism forms (NY)

Event of Interest

1933 Brazilian President Getulio Vargas declares himself dictator

Music Premiere

1935 Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's musical "Jumbo" premieres in NYC

Event of Interest

1935 Cole Porter's musical "Anything Goes" closes at 46th Street Theatre, NYC, after 420 performances

    German air force begins bombing of Madrid K B Regiment refuses round-table conference in East-India LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide) is first synthesized by Swiss chemist Dr. Albert Hofmann at the Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, Switzerland

Event of Interest

    German U-boat torpedoes tanker Sliedrecht near Ireland World War II: In response to Germany's leveling of Coventry, England two days before, the Royal Air Force bombs Hamburg. German troops conquer Kertsh (probably) Assault of US B-17 Flying Fortresses on airport at Sidi Ahmed World War II: American bombers strike a hydro-electric power facility and heavy water factory in German-controlled Vemork, Norway. US 9th division & 1st Army attacks at Geilenkirchen Yeshiva College (University), chartered in NY, 1st US Jewish College Founding of UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Two new elements discovered by Glenn Seaborg, James, Morgan and Albert Ghiorso were are announced: americium (atomic number 95) and curium (atomic number 96) 15,000 demonstrate in Brussels against mild sentence of Nazis

NBA Record

1957 Celtic Bill Russell sets NBA record of 49 rebounds beat Philadelphia 111-89

Murder of Interest

1957 American murderer and bodysnatcher Ed Gein kills his last victim

All Eyes on Birthplace of British Rock 'n' Roll

1957 BBC’s 1st pop music show, the "Six-Five Special", is broadcast from the tiny 2i’s Coffee Bar in London

    "The Sound of Music" musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, opens at Lunt Fontanne Theater, NYC, for 1443 performances NL batting champion Dick Groat wins MVP United Kingdom limits immigration from Commonwealth countries

Event of Interest

1961 US President JFK decides to increase military aid to South Vietnam without committing US combat troops

Event of Interest

1962 Wilt Chamberlain of NBA SF Warriors scores 73 points vs NY Knicks

    Toledo, OH newspaper strike began Radio CJCX Sydney Nova Scotia (Canada) starts shortwave transmission USSR performs nuclear test at Eastern Kazakh/Semipalitinsk USSR

Event of Interest

1966 Pirates outfielder Roberto Clemente is named NL MVP

    "Greatest Hits" album by The Temptations is released (Billboard Album of the Year 1967) The Derry Citizens Action Committee defies a ban on marches in Derry, Northern Ireland, by marching with an estimated 15,000 people 1968 Mỹ Lai massacre of between 347 and 504 unarmed South Vietnamese civilians by US soldiers is first reported US President Nixon becomes first president to attend a season NFL game while in office: the Dallas Cowboys beat the Washington Redskins 41-28 Two men are shot dead by the Irish Republican Army (IRA) South Vietnamese Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky defends operations in Cambodia because communist forces could overrun South Vietnam "within 24 hours" if troops operating there were withdrawn The Compton inquiry is published, acknowledging that there was ill-treatment of internees, but rejected claims of systematic brutality or torture (Northern Ireland) The US increase air activity to support the Cambodian government as fighting neared Phnom Penh "Dear Oscar" opens at Playhouse Theater NYC for 5 performances

Event of Interest

1972 British Prime Minister Edward Heath warns against a Unilateral Declaration of Independence


Contents

The French victory at the Battle of Wagram on 6 July forced the commander of the Kaiserlich-königliche Hauptarmee Hauptarmee, the main Austrian army, Archduke Charles of Austria-Teschen, to retreat. In spite of the defeat, the retreat was orderly and very well handled. The French, commanded by Napoleon I, were initially unsure about the exact direction, with reports saying that the Austrians were retreating towards Bohemia, but it was still unclear whether they would retreat using the road to Brünn or the road to Znaim. Other reports from, sent by General Louis-Pierre Montbrun were indicating that the Austrians were actually retreating towards Moravia. Masséna sent scouts towards Krems and the district of Horn and was able to ascertain that the enemy was not retreating in that direction, but he was unable to conclude where they would retreat. It thus took the French a few days after the battle of Wagram, before they could gather enough intelligence to really understand where the Austrians were going. However, by 8 July, things began to clarify for Napoleon, mainly due to intelligence sent by Auguste de Marmont, commander of XI Corps and the significance of a series of combats fought by elements of Masséna's Corps against the VI Korps under Klenau. These combats, fought at Korneuburg and Stockerau allowed Masséna to inform Napoleon that a large Austrian force was indeed retreating towards Bohemia. [3] [1] [4] [ not specific enough to verify ]

Austrian commander Klenau, with an initial force of 18,000 men and 64 cannons had orders to delay the French pursuit. On 9 July, Klenau decided to make another stand, this time near Hollabrunn, around 55 kilometers northwest of Vienna. Following the initial skirmishes, Klenau's force was still 17,000 men strong and it now occupied a strong position. Opposite to him, Masséna only had under his immediate control General Claude Legrand's 1st division of IV Corps, the Corps cavalry under General Jacob François Marulaz and the cuirassiers from the 2nd heavy cavalry division of General Raymond-Gaspard de Bonardi de Saint-Sulpice. Masséna promptly engaged Klenau, while at the same time conducting a full reconnaissance of the battlefield, which enabled him to write to the Emperor and reconfirm that no Austrian regiments were heading towards Krems. Masséna's attacks were at first successful, but Klenau counterattacked and repulsed the French and then opposed staunch resistance to any further attacks. The outnumbered Masséna was forced to break off the combat and wait for his other three infantry divisions, knowing that Claude Carra Saint-Cyr's division would be able to rejoin him shortly, but that Gabriel Jean Joseph Molitor's and Jean Boudet's were much too far off to be of any assistance. [2] [4] [1]

Battle losses are unknown and, although an Austrian victory, the battle of Hollabrunn did allow Masséna to write to Napoleon and report that he was on the right track following the Austrians, whose main body was retreating along the river Thaya near Laa an der Thaya. Johann von Klenau would later be awarded the Military Order of Maria Theresa for his actions at the battle of Wagram and gallant rearguard actions after that battle. Meanwhile, Archduke Charles of Austria-Teschen regrouped a large force at Jetzelsdorf, on the Pulkau river, but he later evacuated this position, after receiving intelligence that a French force was approaching Znaim from the east. The next major combat would be the one at Znaim, where the Austrians demanded an armistice. [2] [4] [1]


Combat of Hollabrunn, 15-16 November 1805 - History

Some of the hardest fighting units of Napoleon's Grande Armée were his cuirassier regiments. Theirs is a distinguished record in all the major campaigns between 1792 and 1815.

1er Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1635 from troops of the Duke of Saxe-Weimer that had been levied in 1631 and admitted into French service in 1631. In 1657 the Regiment was named Colonel-General being renamed the 1er Regiment de Cavalerie in 1791. Iin 1801 the Regiment became the 1er Regiment de Cavalerie-Cuirassiers, finally becoming the 1er Regiment de Cuirassiers in 1803.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: de Clermont-Tonnerre(Stanilas-Marie-Adelaide) - Colonel

1792: Deschamps de la Varenne (Jacques-Antoine) - Colonel

1793: Doncourt (Claude-Louis) - Chef-de-Brigade

1793: Maillard (Jean) - Chef-de-Brigade

1795: Severac(Jaques) - Chef-de-Brigade

1797: Juignet (Jean) - Chef-de-Brigade

1798: Margaron (Pierre) - Chef-de-Brigade

1803: Guiton (Marie-Adrien-Francois) - Colonel

1805: de Berckheim (Sigismond-Frederic) - Colonel

1809: Clerc (Antoine-Marguerite) - Colonel

1814: de la Mothe Guery (Philippe-Christophe) - Colonel

1815: Ordener (Michel) - Colonel

Of the above twelve Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigades, four attained the rank of General-de-Brigade and above.

Deschamps de la Varenne, ( Jacques-Antione)

Born: 4 March 1728

Colonel: 5 February 1792

General-de-Brigade: 8 March 1793

Died: 7 January 1807

Born: 1 May 1765

Chef-de-Brigade: 23 December 1798

General-de-Brigade: 29 August 1803

General de Division: 16August 1813

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804

Baron of the Empire: 29 January 1809

Died: 16 December 1824

Born: 8 June 1761

Colonel: 31 August 1803

General-de-Brigade: 1 April 1807

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 15 June 1804

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 24 December 1805

Baron of the Empire: 2 July 1808

Died: 18 February 1818

de Berckeim, (Sigismond-Frederic)

Born: 9 May 1775

Colonel: 1 April 1807

General-de-Brigade: 12 July 1809

General de Division: 3 September 1813

Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur: 6 August 1805

Officer of the Legin d'Honneur: 11 July 1809

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 May 1813.

Baron of the Empire: 9 March 1810

Died: 28 December 1819

Colonels killed and wounded while in command of the 1e Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Chef-de-Brigade Margaron: wounded 27 Thermidor 1799

Colonel Clerc: wounded 30th October 1813, 30th March 1814

Colonel Ordener: wounded 18 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 1e Cuirassier during the years 1805-1815

Officers killed: Fifteen

Officers died of wounds: Four

Officers wounded: Eighty-six

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Jemmapes, Anderlecht, and Tirelemont.

1793: Maestricht, La Roer, Nerwinden, and Maubeuge.

1794: Mouscron, Pont-a-Chin, Rousselar, and the Capture of Malines.

1796: Rivoli and Tagliamento.

1799: Le Trebbia, La Secchia, Novi, and Genola.

1800: Mozambano.

1801: San-Massiano and Verone.

1805: Wertingen, Ulm, Hollabrunn, Raussnitz, and Austerlitz.

1806: Jena and the Capture of Lubeck.

1807: Hoff and Eylau.

1809: Eckmuhl, Ratisbonne, Essling, Wagram, Hollabrunn, and Znaim.

1812: La Moskowa and Winkowo.

1813: La Katzbach, Leipzig, Hanau, and the defense of Hambourg.

1814: La Chausee, Vauchamps, Bar-sur-Aube, Sezanne, and Valcourt.

1815: Ligny, Genappe, and Waterloo.

2e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1635 from an Ordnance company of Cardinal Richelieu and named Cardinal-Duc in 1643 they were renamed the Royale-Cavalerie and in 1791 the 2eme Regiment de Cavalerie. Their name changed once again in 1802 when the Regiment became the 2eme Regiment de Cavalerie-Cuirassiers and finally in 1803 they were renamed the 2eme Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: Duc d'Esclignac, (Henri-Thomas-Charles de Preissac Fezensac) - Colonel

1792: De La Pinserie d'Hauboutet (Louis) - Colonel

1792: De Beaujeu, (Edmie-Henri) - Chef-de-Brigade

1793: De Marne, (Xavier-Frederic) - Chef-de-Brigade

1793: Magron, (Jacques) - Chef-de-Brigade

1793: Radel, (Jean-Antoine-Etienne) - Chef-de-Brigade

1799: Yvendorff, (Jean-Frederic) - Chef-de-Brigade and in 1803 Colonel

1805: Chouard, (Claude-Louis) - Colonel

1811: Rolland, (Pierre) - Colonel

1813: Morin, (Leonard) - Colonel

1814: de la Biffe, (Louis) - Colonel

1814: Lacroix, (?) - Colonel

1815: Grandjean, (Louis-Stanislas-Francois) - Colonel

Of the above officers four attained the rank of General-de-Brigade

Born: 22 May 1741

Colonel: 27 May 1792

General-de-Brigade: 15 May 1793

Died: 22 June 1818

Born: 19 October 1751

Chef-de-Brigade: 3 September 1799

Colonel: 1803

General-de-Brigade: 24 December 1805

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804

Baron of the Empire: 29 June 1808

Died: 10th November 1816

Born: 15 August 1771

Colonel: 27 December 1805

General-de-Brigade: 6 August 1811

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 23 August 1814

Baron of the Empire: 27 November 1808

Died: 15 May 1843

Born: 8 June 1772

Colonel: 7 September 1811

General-de-Brigade: 28 November 1813

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 5 September 1813

Chevalier of the Empire: 28 January 1809

Baron of the Empire: 23 July 1810

Died: 25 November 1847

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 2e Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Chef-de-Brigade Radal: Wounded 15 July 1798

Colonel Yvendorff: Wounded 2 December 1805

Colonel Rolland: Wounded 16/18 October 1813

Colonel Morin: Wounded 14 February 1814 died of wounds 20th February 1814

Colonel Grandjean: Wounded 18 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 2e Cuirassiers during the years 1805-1815.

Officers Killed: Eight

Officers died of wounds: Four

Officers wounded: Sixty-six

Regimental war record (Battles and combats)

1792: Capture of Spire

1793: Hungrischwolf

1796: Rehutt, Rastadt, Ettlingen, Dunstelkingen, Neresheim, Neubourg, and Riberach

1797: Diersheim

1800: Marengo

1805: Wertingen and Austerlitz

1807: Glottau and Friedland

1809: Eckmuhl, Ratisbonne, Essling, and Wagram

1812: Borodino and La Moskowa

1813: Reichenbach and Dresden

1814: La Rothiere, Rosnay, Champaubert, Vauchamps, Athies, La Fere-Champenoise and Paris

1815: Quatre-Bras and Waterloo

3e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1645 from three old Cavalry Companies and three new ones taking the name Commissaire-General in 1654. In 1791, the Regiment became the 3e Regiment de Cavalerie and in 1802 the name changed to the 3e Regiment de Cavalerie-Cuirassiers, finally becoming the 3e Regiment de Cuirassiers in 1803.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: De Montcanisy, (Alexandre-Guillaume-Morin) - Colonel

1792: De la Mothe-Flers, (Louis-Charles-Anglo) - Colonel

1792: De Bellefonds, (Francois-Leger) - Colonel

1794: Lefbvre, (Jean-Baptiste) - Chef-de-Brigade

1794: Mollard, (Nicolas-Sigisbert) - Chef-de-Brigade

1798: Meunier, (Jean-Baptiste) - Chef-de-Brigade

1801: Preval, (Claude-Antoine-Hippolyte) - Chef-de-Brigade, later Colonel in 1803

1806: Richter, (Jean-Louis) - Colonel

1811: D'Audenarde, (Charles-Eugene-Lalaing) - Colonel

1813: Lacroix, (Jean-Guillaume) - Colonel

Three of the above Officers reached General-de-Brigade .

Born: 6 November 1776

Chef-de-Brigade: 5 March 1801

Colonel: 1803

General-de-Brigade: 31 December 1806

Baron of the Empire: 7 June 1808

Died: 19 February 1857

Born: 24 October 1769

Colonel: 31 Decmber 1806

General-de-Brigade: 6 August 1811

Baron of the Empire: 19 March 1809

Died: 23 December 1840

Born: 13th November 1779

Colonel: 7 September 1811

General-de-Brigade: 5 December 1812

Baron of the Empire: 15 October 1809

Died: 4 March 1859

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 3e Regiment de Cuirassier.

Colonel Richter: Wounded 21/22 May 1809

Colonel Lacroix: Wounded 16/18 October 1813, 18 June 1815 died of wounds 30th June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 3e Cuirassiers during the years 1805 - 1815

Officers killed: Sixteen

Officers died of wound: Three

Officers wounded: Sixty

Regimental War Record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Marquan, La Croix-aux-Bois, Valmy, and Jemmapes

1794: Sprimont

1796: Rastadt and Neresheim

1799: Sesia

1800: Marengo

1805: Austerlitz

1806: Jena

1807: Heilsberg and Friedland

1809: Eckmuhl, Essling, and Wagram

1812: La Moskowa

1813: Dresden and Leipzig

1814: Champaubert

1815: Fleurus and Waterloo

4e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1643 and named La Reine-Mere. In 1666, the name changed to La Reine. In1791, the Regiment became the 4e Regiment de Cavalerie and in 1802 the 4e Regiment de Cavalerie-Cuirassiers. Finally in 1803 it became the 4e Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1792: De Raincourt, (Charles-Ignace) - Colonel

1792: Roux de Fazillac, (Pierre) - Colonel

1793: De la Goublaye, (Francois-Louis) - Chef-de-Brigade

1794: D'Aban, (Joseph) - Chef-de-Brigade

1794: Martin la Meuse, (Dominique) - Chef-de-Brigade

1794: Laplanche, (Jean-Baptiste-Antoine) - Chef-de-Brigade

1803: Herbaut, (Fulgent) - Colonel

1808: Prince Aldobrandini-Borghese, (Francois-Cajetan-Dominique-Phillipe-Andre- Antoine-Vincent-Nicolas-Louis-Gaspard- Melchior-Balthazar) -Colonel

1812: Dujon, (Michel-Menou) - Colonel

1815: Habert, (Jean-Nicolas) - Colonel

The 4e Cuirassiers produced three Generals-de-Brigade

Born: 18 July 1746

Colonel: 13th April 1792

General-de-Brigade: 8 March 1793

Died: 21 February 1833

Born: 25 January 1757

Chef-de-Brigade: 2 October 1794

General-de-Brigade: 29 July 1803

Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804

Baron of the Empire: 21 September 1808

Died: 8 January 1832

Prince Aldobrandini-Borghese, (Francois-Cajetan-Dominique-Philippe-Andre-Antoine-Vincent Nicolas-Louis-Gaspard-Melchior-Balthazard )

Born: 9 June 1776

Colonel: 25 June 1808

General-de-Brigade: 2 January 1812

Died: 29 May 1834

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 4e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Chef-de-Brigade Laplanche: wounded 16 June 1796, wounded 3 September 1796

Colonel Prince Aldobrandini-Borghese: wounded 6 July 1809

Officers killed and wounded while seving with the 4e Cuirassiers during the period 1805-1815

Officers Killed: Fourteen

Officers died of wounds: Four

Officers wounded: Eighty-two

Regimental War record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Valmy

1793: Pirmasens, Kaiserslautern, Sembach, and Kreutznach

1794: Fleurus

1796: Wetzlar and Wurtzbourg

1799: Stokach and Hohenlinden

1805: Caldiero and Tagliamento

1807: Marienwerder and Heilsberg

1809: Essling and Wagram

1812: Polotsk, Smoliany, Borisow, and La Berezina

1813: Bautzen, Dresden, Wachau, Leipzig, and the Siege of Hambourg

1814: Brienne, La Rothiere, Champaubert, Vauchamps, Laon, Fere-Champenoise, and Paris

1815: Ligny and Waterloo

5e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1653 and named Stanislas-Roi in 1725, renamed Royal-Polgne in 1737. The name changed once again in 1791 and became the 5e Regiment de Cavalerie, finally becoming the 5e Regiment de Cuirassiers in 1803.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: Levasseur de Neuilly, (Joachim-Joseph) - Colonel

1792: De Menou du Mee, (Charles-Louis) - Colonel

1793: Laroque, (Jean-Jacques Darnac) - Chef-de-Brigade

1793: Misson, (Pierre-Antoine) - Chef-de-Brigade

1802: Noirot, (Jean-Baptiste) - Chef-de-Brigade and Colonel in 1803

1806: Quinette, (Jean-Charles) - Colonel

1811: Christophe, (Philippe) - Colonel

1814: Gobert, (Armand-Louis) - Colonel

Of the above Colonels and Chef-de-Brigade two reached the rank of General

Levasseur de Neuilly, (Joachim-Joseph)

Born: 17 March 1743

Colonel: 23 November 1791

General-de-Brigade: 30th September 1792

Died: ?

Born: 25 July 1776

Colonel: 31 December 1806

General-de-Brigade: 6 August 1811

Baron of the Empire:7 March 1808

Died: 29 June 1822

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 5e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 5e Cuirassiers during the period 1805-1815

Officers killed: Seventeen

Officers died of wounds: Four

Officers wounded: Fifty-eight

Regimental War Record (Battles and Combats)

1794: La Chataigneraie

1797: Bevilacqua and Rivoli

1799: La Rebbia

1805: Hollabrunn, Brunn, and Austerlitz

1806: Jena and the capture of Lubeck

1807: Hoff, Eylau, Wittenberg, and Koenisberg

1809: Rohr, Eckmuhl, Ratisbonne, Essling, and Wagram

1812: La Moskowa and Winkowo

1813: Leipzig and Hanau

1814: Montmirail, Bar-sur-Aube, Troyes, Nogent, and Saint-Dizier

1815: Ligny and Waterloo

6e Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Created in 1635 and named Dragons du Cardinal, in 1638 the Regimental name changed to the Fusiliers a Cheval de son Eminence. The year1643 saw the name change once again. This time it became the Fusiliers a Cheval du Roi. Three years later in 1646 it changed yet again to the Regiment de Roi. In 1791 they became the 6e Regiment de Cavalerie until 1803 when they became the 6e Regiment de Cuirassiers.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: De Dorthan, (Charles-Francois-Marie-Joseph) - Colonel

1791: De Beaurecueil, (Balthazar-Martin-Just Laugier) - Colonel

1792: De la Hitte, (Jean-Benoit Ducos) - Colonel

1792: Duverger, (Joseph-Gabriel) - Colonel

1792: Conigliano-Carenthal, (Jacques-Marie-Joseph) - Colonel

1793: Tardieu, (Jean-Charles) - Chef-de-Brigade

1794: Pelletier, (Gabriel) - Chef-de-Brigade

1799: Cacatte, (Leonard) - Chef-de-Brigade and in 1803 Colonel

1805: Rioult d'Avenay, (Archange-Louis) - Colonel

1807: D'Haugeranville, (Francois-Charles-Pierre-Marie d'Avrange) - Colonel

1811: Martin, (Isidore) - Colonel

Of the above officers five attained the rank of General-de-Brigade

Born: 23 December 1720

Colonel: 2 June 1792

General-de-Brigade: 1 September 1792

Died: 4 August 1800

Born: 6 October 1751

Colonel: 1 November 1792

General-de-Brigade: 8 March 1793

Died: 9 March 1795

Born: 27 November 1760

Chef-de-Brigade: 2 January 1799

Colonel: 1803

General-de-Brigade: 20th April 1809

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804

Died: 9 May 1837

Rioult d'Avenay, (Archange-Louis)

Born: 21 November 1768

Colonel: 24 February 1805

General-de-Brigade: 25 June 1807

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 4 October 1808

Died: 1 June 1809

D'Haugeranville, (Francois-Charles-Jean-Pierre-Marie d'Avranges)

Born: 6 October 1782

Colonel: 25 June 1807

General-de-Brigade: 27 February 1813

Baron of the Empire: 19 March 1808

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 6e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Colonel Rioult-Davaenay: Wounded 10th June 1807

Colonel D'Haugeranville: Wounded 21/22 May 1809

Colonel Martin: Wounded 18 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 6e Cuirassiers during the period 1805-1815

Officers killed: Twelve

Officers died of wounds: Six

Officers wounded: Seventy-six

Regimental War Record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Siege of Lille and the Siege of Anvers

1793: Blockade of Maestricht, Nerewinden, and Hondschoote

1794: Fleurus

1796: Altenkirchen

1800: Hochstett and Hohenlinden

1805: Verone and Caldiero

1807: Heilsberg

1809: Eckmuhl, Essling, and Wagram

1812: La Moskowa, Winkowo, and Malojaroslawetz

1813: Dresden, Wachau, and Leipzig

1814: Champaubert

1815: Waterloo

7e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Created in 1659 from various foreign Regiments in the service of France and a regiment levied by the Comte de Roye which had been formed in 1657. The Regiment became the 7e Regiment de Cavalerie in 1791 and the 7e Regiment de Cuirassiers in 1803.

Colonels and Chefs-de-Brigade

1791: De Villoutreys de Faye, (Pierre-Louis-Auguste) - Colonel

1793: Gondaud, (Mathurin) - Chef-de-Brigade

1800: Offenstein, (Francois-Joseph) - Chef-de-Brigade and Colonel in 1803

1807: Dubois, (Jacques-Charles) - Colonel

1812: Ordener, (Michel) - Colonel

1813: Richardot. (Claude-Francois) - Colonel

Two of the above officers attained the rank of General-de-Brigade

Born: 27 July 1760

Chef-de-Brigade: 30th May 1800

Colonel: 23 December 1803

General-de-Brigade: 25 June 1807

Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804

Baron of the Empire: 28 May 1808

Died: 27 September 1837

Born: 27 November 1762

Colonel: 25 June 1807

General-de-Brigade: 7 February 1813

Baron of the Empire: 2 August 1808

Died: 14 January 1847

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 7e Regiment de Cuirassiers

Colonel Offenstein: Wounded 10th June 1807

Colonel Dubois: Wounded 6 July 1809

Officers killed and wounded while seving with the 7e Cuirassiers during the period 1805-1815

Officers killed: Thirteen

Officers died of wounds: Six

Officers wounde: Fifty-eight

Regimental War Record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Valmy

1793: Nerwinden, Hondschoote, and Wattignies

1794: Roer

1800: Hochstett

1805: Tagliamento

1807: Heilsberg

1809: Essling and Wagram

1812: Polotsk and La Beresina

1813: Reichenbach and Dresden

1814: Champaubert and Vauchamps

1815: Ligny and Waterloo

Bibliography

Brye, P de. Historique du 6e Regiment de Cuirassiers Paris, 1893.

Bukhari, Emir. Napoleon's Cavalry London : Osprey 1979.

Charavay, Jacques and Noel. Les Generaux morts pour la Patrie 1792-1815 Paris 1893-1908.

Dezaunay, Captain. Histoire du 1er Regiment de Cuirassiers Angers 1889.

Histoire du 4e Regiment de Cuirassiers (1643-1897) 2 Vols Paris 1897.

Juzancourt, Captain. Historique du 7e Regiment de Cuirassiers (1659-1886) Paris 1887.

Martinien A. Tableaux par Corps et par Batailles des Officiers Tues et Blesse pendant les Guerres de l'Empire 1805-1815 Paris 1899.

Maume, Captain. Histoire du 3e Regiment de Cuirassiers ci-devant Commissaire-General (1645-1892) Paris 1893.

Quinton, D. and B. Dictionnaire des Colonels de Napoleon Paris : S.P.M. 1996.

Rothwiller, Baron. Histoire du deuxieme Regiment de Cuirassiers,ancien Royal de Cavalerie (1635-1876), d'apres les archives du Corps,celle du Depot de la Guerre et autres documents originaux Paris 1877.

Susane, J. Histoire de la Cavalerie Francais 3 Vols Paris 1874.

Vial, Lieutenant. 1653-1893 le 5e Cuirassiers,Histoire du Regiment Lyon 1894.


Combat of Hollabrunn, 15-16 November 1805 - History

The peacetime establishment of the French Infantry consisted of the following:

Eighty-two regiments of the line (each regiment having two battalions consisting of nine companies with one company being a Grenadier company): 85,407 men
Twelve foreign regiments: 12,848 men
One regiment of Swiss Garde: 2,330 men
Eleven Swiss regiments: 11,429 men.
12 Battalions of Infanterie Leger (each with eight Companies): 5,414 men
Grand Total: 117,428 men

In 1791, the old French regiments receive a regimental number instead of a title. The number of regiments was also increased to One hundred and eleven Regiments. The next major change occurred in 1793(by decree of 21st February) when demi-brigade de bataille were formed. The formation of these new demi-brigades being one regular infantry battalion and two volunteer battalions. This meant that the old regiments were split up to form demi-brigades de bataille.

Demi-brigades d'Infanterie de Ligne were formed in 1796 (by the decree of 1 February) from demi-brigades de bataille these gave a much larger formation. The 238 demi-brigades de bataille became 110 demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne. In 1803, the demi-brigades became the regiments that we are familiar with, each regiment having three battalions.

The next major change occurred in 1808 (by decree of 18 February) when the strength of the regiments was raised from three battalions to five, with four in the field and one Depot battalion. Each battalion in the field was to comprise of six companies, one Grenadier, one Voltigeur and four Fusilier companies. The Depot battalion was to comprise four companies.

With war looming between France and the major powers in Europe the following new armies were created:

Armee du Nord - created on the 14th December 1791, divided into the Armee du Nord and the Armee des Ardennes on the 1st October 1792.
Armee du Centre - created 14th December 1791, on the 1st October 1792 it became the Armee de la Moselle
Armee des Vosages - created 1st October 1792.
Armee du Midi - created 13th April 1792, divided into the Armee des Alpes and the Armee des Pyrenees on the 1st October 1792. The Armee des Alpes was subsequently divided to form the Armee de Savoie and the Armee d'Italie on the 1st November 1792.
Armee des l'Interior - created 4th September 1792

From these early days the regiments and commanders that we are familiar with were formed, resulting in the Emperor Napoleons famous Grande Armee.

1er Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne.

1569: Created in Picardie
1585: Regiment de Picardie
1785: Regiment Colonel-General
1791: 1er Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 1er demi-brigade de Bataille(formed from the following battalions) 1er Bataillon, 1er Regiment d'Infanterie
1er Bataillon Volontaires La butte des moulins de Paris 3e Bataillon Volontaires du Loiret

1803: 1er Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Chantereine (Jean-Dubois) - Colonel
1791: De Courcy d'Hervilly (Charles-Augustin) - Colonel
1792: De Montigny (Louis-Adrien Brice) - Colonel
1794: Levrier (Joseph-Placide-Alexandre) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Delamarre (Jean-Francois) - Chef de Brigade
1798: Lepreux (Antoine-Francois) - Chef de Brigade
1799: Desgraviers-Bertholet (Francois-Ganivet) - Chef de Brigade and Colonel in 1803
1807: Saint-Martin (Jean) - Colonel
1814: Cornebize (Louis-Jean-Baptiste) - Colonel
1815: Jacquemet (Michel) - Colonel

Of the above officers three attained the rank of General of Brigade and above

De Montigny (Louis-Adrien Brice)

Born: 19 December 1738
Colonel: 26 October 1792
General de Brigade: 8 March 1793
General de Division: 10 July 1796
Commander of the Legion d'honeur: 14 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 19 March 1808
Died: 6 May 1811

Levrier (Joseoh-Placide-Alexandre)

The Regimental History states Chef de Brigade Levrier was promoted G of D in 1796, no further information available, he is not mentioned under this name in George Six.

Desgraviers-Bertholet (Francois-Ganivet)

Born: 4 February 1768
Chef de Brigade: 30 June 1799 (1er demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (1er Regiment d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 14 August 1809 (4e Regiment d'Infanterie Legere)
General de Brigade: 22 June 1811
Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 1 January 1813 (awarded posthumously)
Died: 26 July 1812 (of wounds sustained at the battle of Salamanca)

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 1er Regiment d'Infanterie

Colonel Saint-Martin: wounded 16 April 1809

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 1er Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Twenty
Officers died of wounds: Eleven
Officers wounded: One hundred and twenty-seven

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Valmy
1793: Wissembourg
1794: Fleurus
1799: Zurich
1800: Moeskirch and Biberach
1805: Caldiero
1806: Civita-del-Tronto and Galiano
1809: Sacile and Wagram
1811: Miranda-Castegna
1812: Arapiles (Salamanca)
1813: Saint-Sebastien
1813: Lutzen, Bautzen, Dresden and Leipzig
1814: Saint-Julien
1814: Brienne, Sezanne, Montmirail, Vauchamps, Laon and Paris
1815: Quatre-Bras and Waterloo

Fleurus 1794, Moeskirch 1800 and Biberach 1800

2e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1776: Formed from the 2e and 4e Bataillons de Picardie
1780: Regiment de Picardie
1791: 2e Regiment d'Infanterie
1795: 2e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)
2e Bataillon, 1er Regiment d'Infanterie
4e Bataillon Volontaires de la Somme
5e Bataillon Volontaires de Paris

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: Du Cavigny (Charles-Leon) - Colonel
1791: Drouet (Francois Richer) - Colonel
1792: De Fontenay (Henri Nadot) - Colonel
1793: Macdonald (Etienne-Jacques-Joseph-Alexandre) - Colonel
1795: De Marpaude (?) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Perrin (Joseph) - Chef de Brigade
1801: Pouchin de la Roche (Pierre-Guillaume) - Chef de Brigade and Colonel in 1804
1805: Delga (Jacques) - Colonel
1809: De Wimppen (Felix-Victor-Emmanuel-Charles) - Colonel
1813: Veran-Andre (Jean) - Colonel
1813: Staglieno (Charles-Louis-Sebastien) - Colonel
1814: Corvinus (Jean) - Colonel
1814: Tripe (Jean) - Colonel

Three of the above officers attained the rank of General of Brigade and above including one Marechal

Macdonald (Etienne-Jacques-Joseph-Alexandre)

Born: 17 November 1765
Chef de Brigade: 8 March 1793 (2e demi-brigade de bataille)
General de Brigade: 26 August 1793
General de Division: 28 November 1794
Member of the Legion d'Honneur: 16 October 1803
Grand Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Grand Eagle of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 August 1809
Marechal: 12 July 1809
Duc de Tarente: 9 December 1809
Died: 25 September 1840

Born: 28 February 1754
Chef de Brigade: 19 April 1796 (2e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 5 June 1800
Died: 9 June 1800 (died of wounds sustained at Genes)

Pouchin de la Roche (Pierre-Guillaume)

Born: 31 January 1767
Chef de Brigade: 19 June 1794 (132e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 29 February 1796 (26e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Chef de Brigade: 8 February 1801 (2e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (2e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 1 February 1805
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 23 August 1814
Baron of the Empire: 5 December 1811
Died: 5 April 1825

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 2e Regiment d'Infanterie

Chef de Brigade Perrin: Wounded 12 May 1800
Colonel Delga: Died of wounds 6 July 1809
Colonel De Wimpffen: wounded 18 August 1812
Colonel Staglieno: wounded 18 October 1813

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 2e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Forty
Officers died of wounds: Nineteen
Officers wounded: One hundred and forty nine

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Lille
1793: Tourcoing
1795: Armee du Nord
1796: Armee de Sambre-et-Meuse
1797: Armee d'Allemange
1798: Armee de Mayence
1799: Stokach and Zurich
1800: Genoa
1805: Cape Finistere and Trafalgar
1806: Armee d'Italie
1807: Armee d'Italie
1808: Grande Armee
1809: Essling, Aspern and Wagram
1812: Polotsk and Berezina
1813: Dresden and Leipzig
1814: La Rothiere
1815: Fleurus and Waterloo

Zurich 1799, Genes (Genoa) 1800 and Polotsk 1812

3e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1569: Regiment de Brissac
1584: Regiment de Piemont
1791: 3e Regiment d'Infanterie
1793: 3e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)

1er Bataillon, 2e Regiment d'Infanterie
5e Bataillon Volontaires de l'Aisne
5e Bataillon Volontaires de la Cote-d'Or

1796: 3e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

91e demi-brigade de Bataille (1er Bat,46e Regt d'Inf, 1er Bat Vol du Jura and 1er Bat Vol de l'Ain)
127e demi-brigade de Bataille (1er Bat, 68e Regt d'Inf, 2e Bat Vol du Haute-Rhin and 3e Bat Vol de la aute-Marne)

1803: 3e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Chadenac (Jean-Louis de Blou) - Colonel
1792: Cambios d'Audrian (Jean-Baptiste) - Colonel
1793: Salme (Jean-Baptiste) - Chef de Brigade
1793: Anglebert (?) - Chef de Brigade
1794: Sarrut (Jacques-Thomas) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Martilliere (Pierre) - Chef de Brigade
1799: Mouton (Georges) - Chef de Brigade
1803: Schobert (Laurent) - Colonel
1811: Ducouret (Louis) - Colonel
1813: Deslon (Claude-Marcel) - Colonel
1814: Vautrin (Hubert) - Colonel

The 3e Regiment produced five officers who became General de Brigade and above

Salme (Jean-Baptiste)

Born: 18 November 1766
Chef de Brigade: 28 October 1793 (3e demi-brigade de bataille)
General de Brigade: 30 March 1794
General de Division: 15 May 1802
Member of the Legion d'Honneur: 7 May 1811
Died: 27 May 1811 (killed before Tarragone)

Sarrut (Jacques-Thomas)

Born: 16 August 1765
Chef de Brigade: 28 May 1794 (3e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 19 February 1796 (8e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 29 August 1803
General de Division: 20 June 1811
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 14 April 1810
Died: 26 June 1813 (died of wounds sustained at the battle of Vittoria)

Born: 23 March 1759
Chef de Brigade: 20 January 1796 (3e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 28 April 1799
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Died: 20 November 1807 (as a result of wounds sustained at Vaprio)

Born: 21 February 1770
Chef de Brigade: 26 May 1798 (99e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Chef de Brigade: 14 July 1799(3e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 24 September 1803 (3e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 1 February 1805
General de Division: 5 October 1807
Count of the Empire: 19 September 1810
Died: 27 November 1838

Born: 30 April 1763
Colonel: 1 February 1805
General de Brigade: 6 August 1811
Baron of the Empire: 1 April 1809
Died: 30 April 1830

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 3e Regiment d'Infanterie

Chef de Brigade Mounton: wounded 30 April 1800
Colonel Scobert: wounded 10 June 1807 and 6 July 1809
Colonel Ducouret: wounded 5 February 1812 and 31 August 1813
Colonel Vautrin: wounded 18 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 3e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Forty-seven
Officers died of wounds: Twenty-four
Officers wounded: Two hundred and sixteen

Regimental war record (Battle and Combats)

1792: Jemmapes
1793: Weitbruck
1796: Armee du Rhin
1797: Armee d'Helvetie
1798: Armee d'Italie
1800: Genoa and La Verriera
1805: Hollabrunn and Austerlitz
1807: Heilsberg and Friedland
1809: Thann, Schierling, Eckmuhl,Essling and Wagram
1812: Sanguessa and Bilbao
1813: Bidassoa, Nivelle and Bayonne
1813: Ghorde
1814: Bar-sur-Aube and Arcis-sur-Aube
1815: Quatre-Bras and Waterloo

Jemmapes 1792, Austerlitz 1805 and Wagram 1809

4e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1776: Formed from two Battalions of the Regiment de Piemont
1785: Regiment de Provence
1791: 4e Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 4e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)

2e Bataillon, 2e Regiment d'Infanterie
3e Bataillon Volontaires de la Republique
4e Bataillon Volontaires Haute-Saone

1796: 4e demi-bigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

39e demi-brigade de Bataille (1er Bat, 20e Regt d'Inf, 1er and 2e Bat Vol Basse Pyrenees)
Plus various detachments from the following demi-brigades. 55e,130e,145e and 147e demi-brigades de Bataille

1803: 4e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: Vial d'Alain (Charles-Guillaume) - Colonel
1791: De Thiballier (Francois-Hubert) - Colonel
1794: Arnaud (Antoine) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Pourailly (Bernard) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Frere (Bernard-George-Francois) - Chef de Brigade
1800: Savettier de Candras (Jacques-Lazare) - Chef de Brigade
1804: Bonaparte (Joseph) - Colonel
1806: Boyeldieu(Louis-Leger) - Colonel
1811: Bucquet (?) - Colonel
1812: Massy (Charles-Baptiste-Bertrand) - Colonel
1812: De Fezensac (Raymond-Aimery-Phillipe-Joseph) - Colonel
1813: Materre (Jean-Baptiste-Martial) - Colonel
1814: Gelibert (Honore) - Colonel
1814: Faullain (Jean-Francois-Antoine-Michel) - Colonel

Seven of the above officers attained the rank of General

Arnaud (Antoine)

Born: 14 January 1749
Chef de Brigade: 18 August 1794 (4e demi-brigade de bataille)
General de Brigade: 29 August 1803
Died: 11 April 1806

Frere (Bernard-George-Francois)

Born: 8 January 1764
Chef de Brigade: 8 September 1796 (4e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Chef de Brigade: 3 January 1800 (Consular-Garde infanterie)
General de Brigade: 13 September 1802
General de Division: 6 March 1808
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Count of the Empire: 18 March 1809
Died: 16 February 1826

Savattier de Candras (Jacques-Lazare)

Born: 24 August 1768
Chef de Brigade: 11 March 1800 (4e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (4e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 13 April 1804
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 27 November 1808
Died: 28 November 1812 (killed at the battle of the Berezina)

Born: 7 January 1768
Colonel: 1804 (exact date not known)
General de Division: 3 January 1806
Grand Eagle of the Legion d'Honneur: 2 February 1805
King of Naples: 31 March 1806
King of Spain: 6 June 1808
Died: 28 July 1848

Boyeldieu (Louis-Leger)

Born: 13 August 1774
Colonel: 9 March 1806
General de Brigade: 21 July 1811
General de Division: 7 September 1813
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 11 July 1807
Baron of the Empire: 20 July 1808
Died: 17 August 1815 (as a result of wounds sustained at Waterloo)

De Fezenac (Raymond-Aimery-Phillipe-Joseph)

Born: 26 February 1784
Colonel: 11 September 1812
General de Brigade: 4 March 1813
Baron of the Empire: 19 September 1809
Died: 18 November 1867

Materre (Jean-Baptiste-Martial)

Born: 16 November 1772
Colonel: 25 February 1813
General de Brigade: 25 February 1814
Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 7 October 1807
Died: 2 February 1843

Colonels killed and wounded while in command of the 4e Regiment d'Infanterie

Chef de Brigade Pourailly: Killed at Castiglione
Colonel Boyeldieu: wounded 10 June 1807 and 6 July 1809
Colonel Massy: Killed 7 September 1812
Colonel Materre: wounded 16 October 1813 and 1 February 1814
Colonel Faullain: wounded 16 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 4e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1791-1815

Officers killed: Forty-four
Officers died of wounds: Twenty-four
Officers wounded: Two hundred and forty

Regimental war record ( Battles and Combats)

1791: Expedition to Saint-Dominique
1795: Mannheim
1796: Mantoue, Castiglione, Verone, Primolano, La Brenta, Caldiero, Arcole, Tagliemento
1798: Expedition to the Iles Saint-Marcouf
1800: Engen, Moeskirch, Memmingen and Hohenlinden
1805: Ulm and Austerlitz
1806: Jena
1807: Eylau, Heilsberg and the capture of Koenigsberg
1809: Eckmuhl, Aspern, Essling and Wagram
1812: Smolensk, Valoutina, La Moskowa and Krasnoe
1813: Dresden, Leipzig and Hanau
1814: Brienne, La Rothiere, Monterau and Troyes
1815: Ligny

Arcole 1796, Hohenlinden 1800, Jena 1806 and Wagram 1809

5e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1569: Regiment des Gardes du Jeune Henri
1589: Regiment de Valirault
1594: Regiment de Navarre
1791: 5e Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 5e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)

1er Bataillon, 3e Regiment d'Infanterie
1er Bataillon, Volonaires du Doubs
4e Bataillon, Volontaires de la Seine-Inferieure

1796: 5e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

146e demi-brigade de Bataille (2e Bat, 79e Regt d'Inf, 1er Bat Vol Cote d'Or and 8e Bat Vol l'Isere)
193e demi-brigade de Bataille ( 1er Bat, 109e Regt d'Inf, 1er Bat Vol de l'Yonne and 3e Bat Vol de la Loire-Inferieure)

1803: 5e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Vouliers (Francois-Charles) - Colonel
1791: Guenand (Louis-Charles) - Colonel
1794: Burnot (?) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Bourdois de Champfort (Edme-Martin) - Chef de Brigade
1797: Le Feron (Louis-Hyacinthe) - Chef de Brigade
1800: Teste (Francois-Antoine) - Chef de Brigade and Colonel in 1803
1806: Plauzonne (Louis-Auguste-Marchand)
1809: Roussille (Jean-Isaac) - Colonel

The 5e Regiment produced four officers who reached the rank of General de Brigade and above

Bourdois de Champfort (Edme-Martin)

Born: 11 March 1750
Chef de Brigade: 21 June 1795 (193e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 19 February 1796 (5e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 12 July 1797
Member of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Died: 24 December 1825

Le Feron (Louis-Hyacinthe)

Born: 30 November 1765
Chef de Brigade: 21 March 1797 (5e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 11 October 1794 (Le Feron however refused the promotion)
Died: 23 August 1799

Teste (Francois-Antoine)

Born: 19 November 1775
Chef de Brigade: 9 August 1800 (5e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (5e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 4 November 1805
General de Division: 14 February 1814
Baron of the Empire: 21 November 1810
Died: 8 December 1862

Plauzonne (Louis-Auguste-Marchand)

Born: 7 July 1774
Colonel: 5 Auguste 1806
General de Brigade: 5 June 1809
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 6 December 1811
Baron of the Empire: 14 April 1810
Died: 7 September 1812 (at the battle of Borodino)

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 5e Regiment d'Infanterie

Colonel Rousille: wounded 13 November 1811 and 18 June 1815

Officers killed and wounded whislt serving with the 5e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Seventeen
Officers died of wounds: Fourteen
Officers wounded: One hundred and nineteen

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Marcon, Valmy and Jemmapes
1793: Lannoy and Hondschoote
1794: Siege of Le Quesnoy, Fleurus, Kaiserlautern and Eselsfurth
1796: Lonato, Castiglione and Mantoue
1797: Cimbras
1799: Pastrengo, Magnano and La Trebbia
1803: Armee d'Italie
1805: Caldiero
1806: Dalmatia , Montenegrins andBergato
1809: Sacile, Malghiera, Ervenich, Gospich, Wagram, Znaim, Lavacca and Meran
1811: Figueras and Moncado
1812: Olot, Saint-Vincent, Carriga and Vich
1813: Bisbal and Barcelone
1813: Lutzen, Wurschen, Dresden, Torau and Leipzig
1814: Belfort, Saint-Julien and Villeseneuse
1815: Waterloo and Belfort

Castiglione 1796 and Wagram 1809

6e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1776: Formed from two battalions of the Regiment de Navarre
1791: 6e Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 6e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the folllowing)
2e Bataillon, 3e Regiment d'Infanterie
2e Bataillon Volontaires de l'Aube
10e Bataillon Volontaires des Vosges
1796: 6e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

196e demi-brigade de bataille ( 2e Bat, 110e Regt d'Inf, 1er Bat Vol de la formation d'Orleans, Bat Vol de l 'Egalitie, 4e Bat Vol de l'Aude, 7e Bat Vol de la Manche and 4e Bat Vol de Seine-et-Marne)
6e bis Regt de l'Ouest

1803: 6e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Cappy (Jean-Baptiste-Marie-Joseph Florimund) - Colonel
1791: L'Huillier de Rouvenac (Jacques-Thomas) - Colonel
1792: Cleday (Pierre) - Colonel
1794: Hotte (?) - Chef de Brigade
1794: Delpierre (Antoine-Joseph) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Hotte (?) - Chef de Brigade
1799: Lepreux (Antoine-Francois) - Chef de Brigade
1799: Dufour (Francois-Marie) Chef de Brigade and Colonel in 1803
1807: Devilliers (Claude-Germain-Louis) - Colonel
1811: Barre (Jean-Etienne) - Colonel
1813: Buchet (Francois-Louis-Julien) - Colonel
1815: Barre (Jean-Etienne) - Colonel

Three of the above officers attained the rank of General de Brigade and above

Delpierre (Antoine-Joseph)

Born: 12 March 1748
Chef de Brigade: 22 July 1794 (6e demi-brigade de bataille)
General de Brigade: 13 June 1795
Died: 15 January 1808

Dufour (Francois-Marie)

Born: 5 December 1769
Chef de Brigade: 30 November 1799 (6e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (6e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 19 January 1807 (in the service of Naples)
General de Division: 4 March 1813
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 17 May 1807
Baron of the Empire: 18 June 1812
Died: 14 April 1815

Devilliers (Claude-Germain-Louis)

Born: 16 November 1770
Colonel: 8 December 1806
General de Brigade: 6 August 1811
Baron of the Empire: 12 November 1811
Died: 21 August 1857

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 6e Regiment d'Infanterie

Colonel Buchet: wounded 19 October 1813

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 6e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Eighteen
Officers died of wounds: Five
Officers wounded: Ninety-six

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Mairieux, Valmy, Clermont, Namur, Hamptinnes and Treves
1793: Tiriemont, Nerwinden, Conde, Doue, Chantonnay, Nantes, Saint-Fulgent, Mons and Savenay
1794: Chalons and Namur
1795: Saint-Cyr
1796: Sancerre, Castello, La Favorite, Mantoue and Mont Saint-Ovide
1797: Cerigo, Gozo, Preveza, Zante and Saint-Maure
1799: Schwitz
1801: Defence of Malta
1813: Mockern, Mersebourg, Wurschen, Bautzen, Leipzig and Hanau
1814: Mincio
1815: Belfort

7e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1569: Formed in Champagne with four companies of Garde du Roi
1585: Regiment de Champagne
1791: 7e Regiment d'Infanterie
1796: 7e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

128e demi-brigade de bataille (2e Bat, 68e Regt d'Inf, 3e Bat Vol de l'Eure and 6e Bat de l'Oise)
1er Bat, 49e Regiment d'Infanterie
2e Bat , 83e Regiment d'Infanterie
3e,7e and 9e Bataillons de Paris
7e Bat, Vol de l'Yonne
16e Bat des Federes

1803: 7e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De la Barthe de Giscard (Jean-Anne) - Colonel
1792: De Rebourguil (Louis-Etienne Auron) - Colonel
1792: De Chanron (Claude-Souchon) - Colonel
1793: Boisconteau (Jean-Joseph Lamy de) - Chef de Brigade
1795: Esprit Arnouilh (?) - Chef de Brigade
1804: Aussenac (Pierre-Gabriel) - Colonel
1812: Bougault (Louis-Loup-Etienne-Martin) - Colonel
1814: Lelong (Barthelemy) - Colonel
1814: Huchet de la Bedoyere(Charles-Angelique-Francois) - Colonel
1815: Boissin (Joseph-Michel) - Colonel

Two officers attained the rank of General de Brigade

Boisconteau (Jean-Joseph-lamy de)

Born: 13 November 1748
Colonel: 8 March 1793
General de Brigade: 23 December 1793
Died: 19 September 1814

Aussenac (Pierre-Gabriel)

Born: 30 March 1764
Chef de Brigade: 6 October 1802 (74e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Chef de Brigade: 22 March 1803 (7e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Chef de Brigade: 6 July 1803 (31e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 16th September 1804 (7e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 6 August 1811
Officer of the Legion d'Honneur: 15 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 15 August 1810
Died: 2 February 1833

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 7e Regiment d'Infanterie

Colonel Bougault: wounded 12 September 1813

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 7e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Nineteen
Officers died of wounds: Eighteen
Officers wounded: One hundred and twenty two

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1793: Ceret, Prats-de-Mollo, La Perche and Peyrestortes
1794: Coloioure, Bellegarde, Montagne, Fleurus and Noire
1795: Roses
1800: Memmingen, Hochstedt and Huningue
1801-1804: Saint-Dominique
1808: El Bruch, Girone, Molins del Rey and Cardedeu
1809: Valls
1810: Granollers, Mollet, Sta Perpetua and Vic
1811: Tarragone
1811: Mont-Serrat, Sagonte and Valence
1812 Valence and Castalla
1813: Bautzen, Juterbock, Leipzig, Hanau and Tagliamento
1814 Yecla and Falleja
1815: Waterloo

Fleurus 1794 and Bautzen 1813

8e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1776: Formed from 1er and 3e Bataillons Regiment de Champagne
1791: 8e Regiment d'Infanterie
1796: 8e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

3e demi-brigade de Bataille (1er Bat, 2e Regt d'Inf, 5e Bat Vol de l'Aisne and 5e Bat Vol de la Cote d'Or)
1er, 2e and 3e Bataillons Volontaires de Lille
1er Bataillon auxillaire de l'Eure
1er Bataillon auxillaire de l'Aisne

1803: 8e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Chalup (Jean-Marc) - Colonel
1792: D'Armenonvil'e (Robon-Antoine-Marie Le Coutrier) - Colonel
1793: Tugnot de Lanoye (Jean-Henri) - Colonel
1796: Sarrut (Jaques-Thomas) - Chef de Brigade
1803: Autie (Jean-Francois-Etienne) - Colonel
1811: Braun (Joseph) - Colonel
1815: Ruelle (Louis-Gabriel) - Colonel

The 8e Regiment produced two Generals of Brigade and above

Tugnot de Lanoye (Jean-Henri)

Born: 24 June 1744
Colonel: 8 March 1793
General de Brigade: 29 April 1794
Died: 25 August 1804

Sarrut (Jacques-Thomas)

Born: 16 August 1765
Chef de Brigade: 28 May 1794 (3e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 19 February 1796 (8e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 29 August 1803
General de Division: 20 June 1811
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Died: 26 June 1813 (as a result of wounds sustained at the battle of Vittoria)

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 8e Regiment d'Infanterie

Colonel Autie: wounded 5 March 1811

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 8e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Eighteen
Officers died of wounds: Fourteen
Officers wounded: One hundred and thirty-four

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1793: Nerwinden, Nimegue and Tirlemont
1795: Armee du Nord
1797: Armee du Nord and Allemangne
1798: Armee de Mayence, Danube and Rhin
1800: Offenbourg and Hohenlinden
1802: Armee du Hanovre
1805: Austerlitz
1806: Halle and Lubeck
1807: Mohrungen, Ostrelenka, Dantzig and Friedland
1808: Espinosa
1809: Talevera-de-la-Reyna
1809: Essling and Wagram
1811: Chiclana and Fuentes-d-Onoro
1813: Lignenza, Vittoria and Pampelune
1813: Dresden
1814: Bar-sur-Aube and Arcis-sur-Aube
1815: Waterloo

Hohenlinden 1800 and Friedland 1807

9e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1617: Regiment de Normandie
1791: 9e Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 9e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)

1er Bataillon, 5e Regiment d'Infanterie
3e Bataillon Volontaires du Nord
2e Bataillon Volontaires du Finistere
1796: 9e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)
2e demi-brigade de bataille (2e Bat, 1er Regt d'Inf - 4e Bat Vol de la Somme and 5e Bat Vol de Paris)
161e demi-brigade de bataille (1er Bat, 89e Regt d'Inf - 9e Bat Vol du Nord and 3e Bat Vol de Paris)

1803: 9e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1792: Desdorides (Jean-Francois-Louis Picault) - Colonel
1794: Cardon (?) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Marpande (?) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Lefebvre (Simon) - Chef de Brigade
1799: Pepin (Joseph) - Chef de Brigade and Colonel in 1804
1808: Gallet (Antoine) - Colonel
1809: Gouy (Andre) - Colonel
1809: Vautre (Victor) - Colonel
1813: Broussier (Nicolas) - Colonel

Two of the above officers became a General de Brigade

Lefebvre (Simon)

Born: 18 November 1768
Chef de Brigade: 10 September 1795 (161e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 31 March 1796 (9e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne)
Chef de Brigade: 19 June 1799 (25e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne)
General de Brigade: 14 December 1801
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 14 June 1804
Baron of the Empire: 23 October 1811
Died: 9 April 1822

Born: 23 May 1763
Chef de Brigade: 23 October 1799 (9e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (9e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 8 December 1808
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 20 May 1810
Baron of the Empire: 15 August 1810
Died: 16 May 1811 (killed at the battle of Albuhera)

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 9e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonel Gallet: killed 6 July 1809
Colonel Gouy: wounded 6 July 1809 Died 21 July 1809( of wounds sustained at battle of Wagram)
Colonel Vautre: wounded 7 September 1812
Colonel Broussier: wounded 2 March 1814

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 9e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Twenty-four
Officers died of wounds: Fifteen
Officers wounded: Ninety-two

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1791: Expedition to Saint-Dominique
1793: Mayence
1794: Fleurus
1796: Armee de Sambre et Meuse
1797: Armee des Alpes
1798: Chebreiss, Pyramides
1799: Saint-Jean d'Acre
1800: Heliopolis, Montebello and Plaissance
1805: Hollabrunn and Austerlitz
1809: Venzone, Sacile, Montebello, Piave, Raab and Wagram
1812: Ostrowno,Moskowa, Malojaroslawetz, Wiasma, Dorogobouj and Krasnoe
1813: Halembourg, Venzone and Bassano
1814: Mincio and Parme
1815: Corps d'Observation du Var

Austerlitz 1805, Wagram 1809 and Moskowa 1812

10e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

1776: Formed from the 1er and 3e Battalions Regiment de Normandie1791: 10e Regiment d'Infanterie
1794: 10e demi-brigade de Bataille (formed from the following)
2e bataillon, 5e Regiment d'infanterie
1er and 2e bataillons Volontaires d'Indre-et-Loire
1796: 10e demi-brigade d'Infanterie de Ligne (formed from the following)

53e demi-brigade de bataille (1er Bat,27e Regt d'Inf - 1er Bat Vol du Bas-Rhin and 3e Bat Vol de la Moselle)
159e demi-brigade de bataille (1er Bat,88e Regt d'Inf - 12e Bat Vol du Jura and 4e Bat Vol de la Cote- d'Or)

1803: 10e Regiment d'infanterie de ligne

Colonels and Chef de Brigade

1791: De Martinet (Amable-Louis-Charles) - Colonel
1792: De Maynard (Madeleine-Charles-Eleazar) - Colonel
1794: Almain (?) - Chef de Brigade
1796: Rivet (Jean-Baptiste) - Chef de Brigade
1802: Soulier (Jean-Antoine) - Colonel
1811: Real (Pierre-Louis-Dominique) - Colonel
1813: Dubalen (Raymond-Martin) - Colonel
1814: d'Ambrugeac (?) - Colonel
1815: Higonet (Philippe) - Colonel
1815: Roussel (Jean-Pierre-Francois Dieudonne) - Colonel

The 10e Regiment produced two General de Brigade

Rivet (Jean-Baptiste)

Born: 14 November 1748
Chef de Brigade: 31 December 1794 (53e demi-brigade de bataille)
Chef de Brigade: 12 May 1796 (10e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 9 February 1796 (Rivet however refused the promotion)
Died: 1805

Soulier ( Jean-Antoine)

Born: 19 February 1766
Chef de Brigade: 30 December 1802 (10e demi-brigade d'Infanterie)
Colonel: 1803 (10e Regiment d'Infanterie)
General de Brigade: 6 August 1811
Commander of the Legion d'Honneur: 28 June 1813
Baron of the Empire: 1 January 1813
Died: 14 April 1835

Colonels killed and wounded while commanding the 10e Regiment d'Infanterie de Ligne

Colonel Dubalen: 10 April 1814

Officers killed and wounded while serving with the 10e Regiment d'Infanterie during the period 1804-1815

Officers killed: Nineteen
Officers died of wounds: Fifteen
Officers wounded: One hundred and eight

Regimental war record (Battles and Combats)

1792: Armee du Midi
1794: Fleurus
1795: Armee des Cotes de Cherbourg
1796: Armee des Cotes de l'Ocean
1796: Rastadt, Ettlingen, Neresheim, Friedberg, Geisenfeld, Biberach and Keh
1798: Armee d'Angleterre
1799: Armee d'Italie - Murazzo and Genola
1805: Castel-Franco
1806: Siege of Gaete, Tino, Sorra and Trente
1808: Capture of the Isle of Capri
1810: Messine
1811: Saint-Gregoire
1813: Soz and Sarragosse
1813: Lutzen, Bautzen, Goldberg, Liepzig and Hanau
1814: Mincio and Toulouse
1815: Waterloo

Fleurus 1794, Lutzen 1813 and Toulouse 1814

Bibliography


Charavay J. and N. Les Generaux morts pour la Patrie 1792-1815 Paris 1893 Vol one and 1908 Vol two.

E-M de Lyden. Nos 144 Regiments de Ligne Paris N.D.

Deprez E. Les Volontaires Nationaux (1791-1793) Paris 1908.

Garcin M. La Patrie en danger (histoire des bataillons de Volontaires 1791-1794)
Rhone 1991.

Historique des Corps de Troupes de l'Armee Francaise Paris 1900.

Martinien A. Tableaux par Corps et par Batailles des Officiers tues et blesse pendant les guerres de l'Empire 1805-1815 Paris 1899.

Mullie M.C. Biographie des Celebrites militaires des Armes de Terre et de Mer
2 Vols Paris 1851.

Quintin D. and B. Dictionnaire des Colonels de Napoleon Paris 1996.

Six G. Dictionnaire Biographique des Generaux et Amiraux Francais de la Revolution et de l'Empire 1792-1814 Paris 1934.


LANNES, Jean

Born Lectoure (Gers), 10 April, 1769, died Eberdorff (Austria), 31 May 1809.
Volunteer in 2e bataillon de Gers, 1792
Armée des Pyrénées-Orientales, 1793-95
Wounded in the arm, Banyuls
Commanded the avant-garde of the Brigade Laterrade at the taking of the camp at Villalonga, 19 December, 1793
Chef de brigade de grenadiers in the same battalion, 25 December, 1793
Passed over to the Armée d’Italie, fighting at Loano (24 November, 1795), Voltri (9 April), Millesimo (14 April), Dego (15 April), Fombio (8 May), Lodi (10 May), Pavia and Binasco (where he set fire to the village, 26 May), Saint-Georges (4 June), Arquata and Livorno (20 June), Bassano (8 September), Due Castelli (14 September), Governolo (15 September), Arcole (15 November), Lodi (13 December), Senio (3 February), Ancona (9 February)
Attached to the Armée d’Angleterre, 12 January, 1798, fighting at Malta (10 June), the taking of Alexandria and Rosetta (26 July), put down the Cairo revolt (21 October)
Commanded a division in the Armée de Syrie, fighting at El-Arysch (20 February), Jaffa (7 March), wounded in the head in the attack on St Jean d’Acre (8 May), Aboukir (wounded in the leg at the siege of the fort, 27 July)
Left for France with Bonaparte, 22 August, 1799
Disembarked with him at Saint-Raphaël, 9 October
Took part in the coup d’Etat of 18 Brumaire by commanding headquarters at the Tuileries, 9 November
Commandant extraordinaire of the 9e and 10e divisions militaries, 12 November to 27 December
Commandant and Inspecteur général of the Garde Consulaire, 16 April, 1800
Commandant of the Avant-Garde of the Armée de Réserve, 10 May, 1800
Crossed the Great St Bernard Pass and took Aosta, 16 May
Fought at Châtillon (18 May), Chiusella (26 May), Pavia (2 June), Montebello (9 June), Marengo (he withstood the Austrian attack for 7 hours, for which he received from Bonaparte a ‘sabre d’honneur’, 14 June)
Plenipotentiary minister and sent to Portugal, 14 November, 1802
Returned to France after trade difficulties to become Commandant of the Camp d’Ambleteuse, 4 July, 1803
Maréchal d’Empire, 19 May, 1804
Chef of the 9e cohort of the Légion d’Honneur
Grand croix du Christ de Portugal, 1805
Grand Aigle of the Légion d’Honneur, 2 February, 1805
Commandant of the Avant-garde of the 5e corps of the Grande Armée, 23 August, 1805
Fought at Weringen (8 October), Ulm, Braunau (30 October), Hollabrunn (16 November)
Commanded the left wing at Austerlitz, 2 December, 1805
Commandeur of the Couronne de Fer, 25 February, 1806
Commandant of the 5e corps of the Grande Armée
Fought at Saalfeld (10 October), commanded the centre at Iéna (14 October), victor at Pultusk (26 December 1806, slightly wounded)
Left his command on health grounds, January 1807
Grand croix of the order of Saint-Henri de Saxe
Commandant of the Corps de Réserve of the Grande Armée, 5 May to 12 July, 1807
Fought at Danzig (20 May), Heilsberg (10 June), commanded the centre at Friedland, 14 June, 1807
Colonel general of the Suisses, 13 September, 1807
Chevalier of the order of Saint-André de Russie, 1808
Duc de Montebello, 15 June 1808
At headquarters in the Armée de l’Espagne, October 1808
Led the 3e corps to victory over Castanos at Tudela, 23 November, 1808
Following a fall from his horse, he stood down as commander and returned to headquarters, 2 December, 1808
Commanded the siege of Saragossa, which capitulated 21 February, 1809
Called to serve in the Armée d’Allemagne, reaching headquarters on 19 April, 1809
Fought at Landshut (21 April), Eckmühl (22 April), Ratisbon (23 April)
Took command of the 2e corps of the Armée d’Allemagne, 24 April, 1809
Fought at the siege of Vienna (11 May) and Essling (21 May) where he died from his wounds and the ensuing amputation
Buried in the Pantheon

A mere volunteer who became a soldier of extraordinary bravery and sang-froid, literally covered in scars, Lannes was a key figure in Napoleon’s military success. Very much down-to-earth (in Italy when offered the Pope’s hand to kiss, he firmly shook it). Lannes was reached his zenith of popularity (particularly amongst his men) in April 1800 was he was appointed Inspecteur general of the Garde Consulaire. But his friendship with Bonaparte was not however without its ups and downs – his popularity was seen by Bonaparte as a challenge and his obstinate use of ‘tu’ to the Premier Consul at a time when Napoleon wished to distance himself led to his exile by promotion to the post of Plenipotentiary in Portugal. He was very successful as a commandant in the Grande Armée and his death at Essling was deeply felt by Napoleon and the Grande Armée.

Further reading

Thoumas, Le Maréchal Lannes, Paris: Calmann Lévy, 1891
Zins, R., Le Marechal Lannes: favori de Napoléon, Entremont le Vieux: Le Temps Traversé: Editions Curandera, 1994


Popular conceptions [ edit | edit source ]

The Battle of Austerlitz, 2 December 1805 by Joseph Swebach-Desfontaines.

Artists and musicians on the side of France and her conquests expressed their sentiment in populist and elite art of the time. Prussian music critic E.T.A. Hoffmann, in his famous review of Beethoven's 5th Symphony, "singles out for special abuse a certain Bataille des trois Empereurs, a French battle symphony by Louis Jadin celebrating Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz." ⏁]

War and Peace [ edit | edit source ]

The Battle of Austerlitz is a major event in Leo Tolstoy's novel War and Peace. As the battle is about to start, Prince Andrei, one of the main characters, thinks that the approaching "day [will] be his Toulon, or his Arcola," ⏂] references to Napoleon's early victories. Andrei hopes for glory, even thinking to himself, "I shall march forward and sweep everything before me." ⏂] Later in the battle, however, Andrei falls into enemy hands and even meets his hero, Napoleon. But the previous enthusiasm has been shattered he no longer thinks much of Napoleon, "so petty did his hero with his paltry vanity and delight in victory appear, compared to that lofty, righteous and kindly sky which he had seen and comprehended." ⏃] Tolstoy, who is known for his hatred of Napoléon, portrays Austerlitz as an early test for Russia, one which ended badly because the soldiers fought for irrelevant things like glory or renown rather than the higher virtues which would produce, according to Tolstoy, a victory at Borodino during the 1812 invasion.

Historical views [ edit | edit source ]

Napoleon did not succeed in defeating the Allied army as thoroughly as he wanted, ⏄] but historians and enthusiasts alike recognize that the original plan provided a significant victory. For that reason, Austerlitz is sometimes compared to other great tactical battles such as Cannae or Blenheim. Some historians suggest that Napoleon was so successful at Austerlitz that he lost touch with reality, and what used to be French foreign policy became a "personal Napoleonic one" after the battle. ⏅] In French history, Austerlitz is acknowledged as an impressive military victory, and in the 19th century, when fascination with the First Empire was at its height, the battle was revered by the likes of Victor Hugo, who "in the depth of [his] thoughts" was hearing the "noise of the heavy cannon rolling towards Austerlitz". ⏆] In the 2005 bicentennial, however, controversy erupted when neither French President Jacques Chirac nor Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin attended any functions commemorating the battle. ⏇] On the other hand, some residents of France's overseas departments protested against what they viewed as the "official commemoration of Napoleon", arguing that Austerlitz should not be celebrated since they wrongly believed that Napoleon committed genocide against colonial people, a policy of constant repentance is very present in France denounce by many as "auto-flagellation". ⏇]

After the battle, Tsar Alexander I laid all the blame on M. I. Kutuzov, Commander-in-chief of the Allied Army. ⏈] However it is clear that Kutuzov's plan was to retreat farther to the rear where the Allied army had sharp advantage in logistics. In that case the Allied troops might have been reinforced by Archduke Charles's troops from Italy, and the Prussians might have joined the Coalition against Napoleon. A French army at the end of her supply lines, in a place which had no food supplies, would have faced a very different ending from the real battle of Austerlitz. ⏉]


Watch the video: Russian Empire. 1825. Battle of Russian Line Infantry in Decembrist revolt