AHE 2013 Design

AHE 2013 Design


The energy balance study: the design and baseline results for a longitudinal study of energy balance

Purpose: The Energy Balance Study (EBS) was a comprehensive study designed to determine over a period of 12 months the associations of caloric intake and energy expenditure on changes in body weight and composition in a population of healthy men and women.

Method: EBS recruited men and women aged 21 to 35 years with a body mass index between 20 and 35 kg/m2. Measurements of energy intake and multiple objective measures of energy expenditure, as well as other physiological, anthropomorphic and psychosocial measurements, were made quarterly. Resting metabolic rate and blood chemistry were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months.

Results: Four hundred and thirty (218 women and 212 men) completed all baseline measurements. There were statistically significant differences by sex uncovered for most anthropomorphic, physiological and behavioral variables. Only percent of kcals from fat and alcohol intake, as well as energy expenditure in light activity and very vigorous activity were not different. Self-reported weight change (mean +/- SD) over the previous year were 0.92 +/- 5.24 kg for women and--1.32 +/- 6.1 kg for men. Resting metabolic rate averages by sex were 2.88 +/- 0.35 ml/kg/min for women and 3.05 +/- 0.33 ml/kg/min for men.

Conclusion: Results from EBS will inform our understanding of the impact of energy balance components as they relate to changes in body weight and composition. Initial findings suggest a satisfactory distribution of weight change to allow for robust statistical analyses. Resting metabolic rates well below the standard estimate suggest that the evaluation of the components of total energy expenditure will be impactful for our understanding of the roles of energy intake and expenditure on changes in energy utilization and storage.


10 Packaging Designs That Changed My History

This is not an arbitrary selection of beautiful packaging designs found in books. It is a personal collection of what Guillermo Dufranc, Graphic Design Coordinator at Tridimage, calls "design-facts ” - which influence the way packaging design is conceived. Read more after the jump.

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Most of these works shown below aren´t probably examples of the latest packaging design trends, but they surely had inspired a whole generation of designers, like me, that are designing more and more appealing and creative packaging designs today.

I can even remember the very moment when I saw them for the first time and thought – these are really creative and distinct packaging designs.

1. IZZE

A simple insinuation of a fruit makes, in a way I cannot explain, the brain think that there is a fruit there.

2. Somerfield Soup

The blackboard and chalk may seem not very innovative nowadays, but they express the ingredients freshness and traditional-made meals feel impeccably.

3. Cider

With a smart and cunning emoticon generated just only by rotating the logotype, the brand plays with consumers´ complicity.

4. 1 Litre Water

An amazing bottle, which is useful like no other bottle is nowadays.

5. EAT

The extremely functional design talks plainly with simple speech. It has been conceived as an uncomplicated urban solution to eat, drink and go on.

6. Mother Megs

The granny´s cookies! The product embodies tradition and home-made feel with very few graphic resources and an excellent packaging choice.

7. Belazu

The product´s natural origin is depicted by a tree that looks like a hand holding an olive. This playful illustration symbolizes craft care at the same time.

8. Innocent

This is an innocent beverage that could do you no harm because it is healthy. The little angel from the front panel says that without saying it. On the back panel they state “there isn´t a chicken inside”

9. Harvey Nichols

The product image is replaced by an unexpected photograph and in some way allows us to recognize what kind the product is. They used a expensive cosmetics style to bring a premium feel.

10. Mr Lee Soup

To create a character from the very packaging it is a formidable idea. Besides, the illustration graphic style fits perfectly to represent its origin in the occidental world.

About Guillermo Dufranc

Guillermo Dufranc is Graphic Design Coordinator at Tridimage, a leading Latin American Branding and Structural & Graphic Package Design agency based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Since 1995 Tridimage has been helping shape world-class brands by working close to their clients on award winning design solutions.


The History of Interior Design

21st August 2013 | IN DESIGN ADVICE | BY SBID

Although modern interior design probably conjures up images of fancy homes in glossy magazines along with some high-class designer websites such as Lampcommerce.com, when studying the history of interior design, it becomes apparent that perhaps there is more than meets the eye. Here is a quick guide to interior design through the ages, starting from the very beginning.

The beginning

The earliest evidence dates back to when early prehistoric humans first started to settle and either found or built up stable communities using elemental tools. Although the focus back then was function and necessity, the fact that these cave men used to decorate their dwellings with basic drawings could lead us to believe that interior design and looking after our homes is actually a primal instinct as well as a sign of our intelligence. Tribes to this day still use natural materials such as wood, mud and animal skins to fashion themselves a comfortable and functional home.

Egyptians, Greeks and Romans

Egyptians were known for their ornate murals which acted at beautiful documents that detailed their beliefs, history and way of life. Life was a mix of stark parallels for the Ancient Egyptians. While many workers lived in primitive houses, the magnificent buildings they are best known for were usually for one ruler or a royal family to signify their wealth and to please their gods. This early civilisation set the trend for superb, ornate interior design in the name of religion which is still plays a big part in society today.

After Ancient Egypt fell to the Romans and Greeks, cities were drastically changed due to the Greek and Roman tastes in architectural style. Democracy and a more civilised way of life allowed normal citizens to show their personal tastes through interior design. The Greeks in particular employed strict rules for constructing their massive, pillared buildings and often used beautiful vases and paintings in their homes.

Design progression in Europe

After these influential periods in history, other distinctive design styles emerged in Europe, particularly Gothic architecture alongside the indulgent beauty seen during the Italian Renaissance. Again, the focus for many large scale buildings was based around religion with carvings, tapestries and murals which stretched over entire ceilings and walls. Beauty and function were equally important.

18 th and 19 th centuries

From Baroque’s artistic exaggeration to the industrial revolution to Art Deco and Art Nouveau, interior design opened up to the common man, as fashion magazines and prints hit the shelves during the industrial revolution. Interior design was influenced by a mixture of styles from around the world as travel became more accessible. This eventually led to the age of eclecticism which drew these styles together to create personality and character.

20 th and 21 st century

Modernism and post-modernism soon followed. Designers became famous faces rather than behind the scenes workers. As countries recovered from war, there was a return to prosperity and a large influx in suburban sprawls. More people started to indulge in interior design as a form of escapism and personal interest. Makeover shows such as Changing Rooms also started to influence our homes and old, vintage styles were starting to be revived.

Today, it can be fair to say that we are still in an eclecticism era, as old vintage continues to be teamed with modern features. After thousands of years of groundwork, people can now play and experiment with a whole host of styles to create their perfect homes. Rather than uniformity, interior design is now fast paced with seasonal trends and forecasts for the coming year.


World War I recruitment

Americans are most familiar with Uncle Sam (below), our star-spangled military recruitment figure. But in fact, the iconic representation of Uncle Sam with his authoritative forefinger was modeled after a World War I recruitment poster from across the pond, featuring Great Britain’s famous Field Marshal Herbert Kitchener (above).

US Army Recruitment poster, 1917: J. M. Flagg (via Wikipedia) Left: “Our boys need sox…” (via Wikimedia) Right: “Wake up, America!” by James Montgomery Flag (via Wikimedia)

Here are a few other posters that were designed to enervate the American populace about getting involved in the European war.


Inhaler Devices

Given their direct impact on the health and quality of life for millions, inhalers represent a major turning point in the history of modern medicine. Inhaler devices: Fundamentals, design and drug delivery provides readers with an introduction to the fundamentals of inhaler technology, with a comprehensive discussion of the history of inhalers as well as a discussion on current research and development.

Part one discusses the fundamentals and development of inhaler devices as well as drug formulations for inhalers. The treatment of asthma is also discussed. Part two reviews recent developments in drug formulation and nanotechnology for inhaler devices, emerging inhaler technology and possible future trends.

Inhaler devices: Fundamentals, design and drug delivery is an essential design guide for good industrial practice, and will be an invaluable resource for those researching and treating conditions such as asthma and those developing and manufacturing inhalation devices.

Given their direct impact on the health and quality of life for millions, inhalers represent a major turning point in the history of modern medicine. Inhaler devices: Fundamentals, design and drug delivery provides readers with an introduction to the fundamentals of inhaler technology, with a comprehensive discussion of the history of inhalers as well as a discussion on current research and development.

Part one discusses the fundamentals and development of inhaler devices as well as drug formulations for inhalers. The treatment of asthma is also discussed. Part two reviews recent developments in drug formulation and nanotechnology for inhaler devices, emerging inhaler technology and possible future trends.

Inhaler devices: Fundamentals, design and drug delivery is an essential design guide for good industrial practice, and will be an invaluable resource for those researching and treating conditions such as asthma and those developing and manufacturing inhalation devices.


Juliet Balconies: The Worst Architectural Design In History

For the unfamiliar, or those lacking enough hate in their hearts for these things, the Juliet Balcony is essentially as good as a mirage, giving one the feeling that there is usable outdoor space in an apartment, but not actually delivering any. This style of balcony often provides just a few inches of floor protruding from one's apartment, which could drive any inhabitant mad—Lady Macbeth-levels mad—wondering why the architect didn't just add a few more inches, or ideally: feet. A more generous one may allow for a small potted plant, but typically you're lucky if your big toe can enjoy a breeze while resting upon its shallow platform.

So why all this hate for a balcony style that's been around forever and isn't actually hurting anyone? These pasted-on decorations are being used on many of the newer "luxury"-style apartments around the city, they're all over the rental market, and even appear in the new micro-apartment renderings. So we're here with a plea: architects, please bring these balconies to their timeless end.


The Complete Performance History of the Nike Air Tailwind

Nike has revolutionized the athletic footwear industry in countless ways over the decades, but perhaps the one Swoosh technology that stands out above all the rest in terms of its lasting imprint in the sneaker world is Nike Air cushioning.

As the story goes, in 1977, aerospace technology specialist Frank Rudy came to Nike with an ingenious idea: to put an air pocket inside the sole of a shoe as a form of more sufficient cushioning. Nike took that idea and ran with it--literally.

Within a year, Nike introduced the first shoe ever to feature its proprietary Air technology in the appropriately named Air Tailwind running shoe. Following just a short stint in Nike’s R&D facilities, the Air Tailwind was released in limited quantities in Hawaii ahead of the 1978 Honolulu Marathon. It didn’t take long for the game-changing shoe to sell out and create an undying buzz in the running world. Thus a legend was born.

Though weary of the idea at first, runners were eager to put the innovative cushioning platform to the test. They got their chance the following year in 1979, when Nike announced a full-fledged distribution effort for the Air Tailwind.

Since the original Air Tailwind made its debut in the late �s, Nike has expanded the iconic series with the addition of newer models that don’t necessarily share much with the OG version in terms of design, but are still anchored with the same Air cushioning concept that put the Air Tailwind on the map.


Juneteenth

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Juneteenth, also called Emancipation Day, or Juneteenth Independence Day, holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, observed annually on June 19. Juneteenth is celebrated on Saturday, June 19, 2021.

What is Juneteenth?

Juneteenth is a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States. It is also called Emancipation Day or Juneteenth Independence Day. The name “Juneteenth” references the date of the holiday, combining the words “June” and “nineteenth.”

When is Juneteenth?

Juneteenth is celebrated annually on June 19.

What is the origin of Juneteenth?

Juneteenth was originally celebrated in Texas, on June 19, 1866. It marked the first anniversary of the day that African Americans there first learned of the Emancipation Proclamation, more than two years after it was initially issued. The holiday was originally celebrated with prayer meetings and by singing spirituals and wearing new clothes to represent newfound freedom. Within a few years, African Americans were celebrating Juneteenth in other states, making it an annual tradition. Learn more.

Is Juneteenth a federal holiday?

Juneteenth is a federal holiday in the United States. Legislation establishing the holiday was passed by Congress on June 16, 2021, and signed into law by U.S. President Joe Biden the following day. Juneteenth had previously been established as a state holiday in Texas in 1980, with a number of other states later declaring it a state holiday or day of observance.

How is Juneteenth celebrated?

Juneteenth celebrations in the United States typically include prayer and religious services, speeches, educational events, family gatherings and picnics, and festivals with food, music, and dancing. The day is also celebrated outside the United States and is used to recognize the end of slavery as well as to celebrate African American culture and achievements.

How did the American civil rights movement affect Juneteenth celebrations?

Juneteenth celebrations in the United States declined in the 1960s, overshadowed by the civil rights movement. However, the holiday began to regain its importance in 1968 when the Poor People’s Campaign, originally led by Martin Luther King, Jr., held a Juneteenth Solidarity Day. Interest in Juneteenth continued to increase in the following decades, and the first state-sponsored Juneteenth celebration was held in Texas in 1980.

In 1863, during the American Civil War, Pres. Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states to be free. More than two years would pass, however, before the news reached African Americans living in Texas. It was not until Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, that the state’s residents finally learned that slavery had been abolished. The former slaves immediately began to celebrate with prayer, feasting, song, and dance.

The following year, on June 19, the first official Juneteenth celebrations took place in Texas. The original observances included prayer meetings and the singing of spirituals, and celebrants wore new clothes as a way of representing their newfound freedom. Within a few years, African Americans in other states were celebrating the day as well, making it an annual tradition. Celebrations have continued across the United States into the 21st century and typically include prayer and religious services, speeches, educational events, family gatherings and picnics, and festivals with music, food, and dancing.

Juneteenth became a state holiday in Texas in 1980, and a number of other states subsequently followed suit. The day is also celebrated outside the United States, with organizations in a number of countries using the day to recognize the end of slavery and to celebrate the culture and achievements of African Americans.


The Natural History of American Design

Julius Kirschner/American Museum of Natural History Library Clark Wissler in the Plains Indians storage room, American Museum of Natural History, circa 1914.

The trove of rare photographs, textiles, design manuals and garments on display in 𠇊n American Style: Global Sources for New York Textile and Fashion Design, 1915-1928,” which opens today in the Focus Gallery at the Bard Graduate Center, calls attention to a relatively unknown effort after World War I by the American Museum of Natural History to inspire and energize New York fashion designers. The initiative granted the designers unfettered access to the museum’s ethnographic collections of Native American, Mesoamerican, Andean and South American relics. Curators opened up the museum’s specimen storage rooms and lent artifacts, like beaded Native American dresses from the Blackfoot tribe, to design firms and department stores for inspiration. The goal was to develop a distinctly American (as opposed to European) design language, but the museum ultimately abandoned the project and its fleeting dream of building a separate museum devoted to non-Western textile arts and industrial design, modeled after London’s Victoria & Albert Museum.

Now, the original artifacts are on view in the exhibition curated by Ann Marguerite Tartsinis, who thinks the initiative was embedded in the spirit of its time. A hand-batiked caftan from 1920, in particular, represents the convergence of the era’s artistic modernism and wartime nationalism. “The garment represents the bohemian style cultivated by the artistic and cultural avant-garde in New York in the 1920s, while displaying the confluence of global sources championed by the so-called �shion staff’ at the museum,” she said. With fringe trending on the runways right now, it seems that legacy of the project is alive and well in the imaginations of designers today.


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