Grasp ARS-24 - History

Grasp ARS-24 - History

Grasp

To make the motion of seizing or trying to seize; to clutch; to grip.

(ARS-24: dp. 1,360; 1. 213'6", b. 39', dr. 14'4", s.
15 k.; epl. 120; a. 4 40mm. 4 .50 cal. mg.; cl. Diver)

Grasp (ARS-24) w.as launched 31 July 1943 by the Basalt Rock Co., Napa, Calif.; sponsored by Mrs. J. B. McDonough; and commissioned 22 August 1944, Lt. Comdr. Jacob F. Lawson, in command.

After fitting out at San Francisco and shakedown along the California coast out of San Diego, Grasp sailed for the Pacific, reaching Hawaii 27 October 1944. From Pearl Harbor she headed for combat, reaching Manus, Admiralty Islands, 24 December to prepare for her role in the upcoming Lingayen Gulf operations. Joining the battle group, under the overall command of Admiral T. C. Kincaid, Grasp sailed for the Philippines 1 January 1945. Enroute the ships were attacked by heavy concentrations of Japanese aircraft, including the suicidal kamikazes. Overcoming all attacks in which Grasp shot down one plane and assisted against others, the fleet forced its way deep into enemy waters and landed General MacArthur's troops at Lingayen Gulf 9 January. Grasp was there to assist battle damaged ships, and clear the harbor of sunken craft. In addition to aiding Warhauk and Otis Skinner, damaged by the Japanese, Grasp pulled two landing craft off the beaches and salvaged an enemy cargo submarine hazardous to shipping.

From Lingayen Gulf, Grasp sailed to Tacloban Harbor, Philippines, with an injured APD, Brooks, in toy.

There she joined TG 78 and on 29 January 1945 participated in the initial landings at Zambales Luzon. After helping to make this another of the fleet's long role of successful amphibious assaults, Grasp sailed to Manila Harbor 2 March. As part of the harbor clearance force under Commodore W. A. Sullivan, she remained in the Manila area for over a year. Grasp salvaged sunken ships in the harbor and also made emergency repairs to various naval and merchant ships. Departing the Philip. pines 27 April 1946, she reached San Pedro, Calif., via Pearl Harbor and Astoria, Oreg., 5 June. Grasp decommissioned there 12 December 1946 and was placed in reserve.

When the Korean War broke, ships again immediately became in short supply. Grasp recommissioned at San Diego 10 October 1950 and prepared for combat. Reaching Sasebo, Japan, via Pearl Harbor 12 February 1951, Grasp at once proceeded on to Wonsan, Korea, for salvage and patrol work. As she patrolled the coast between Wonsan and Songjin, both under blockade and sedge by the fleet, Grasp came frequently under fire from Communist North Korean shore batteries, but was never hit. The two Korean ports were under sedge with daily bombardment and minesweeping because of their value as a ditching place for pilots who could not make it back to the carriers steaming off the coast. With the heavy sea protection these pilots could ditch at Wonsan with some confidence of rescue. After 2 months on the line off Korea Grasp returned to Sasebo 15 April to continue repair work on damaged ships.

After two more cruises along the Korean coast, interspersed with repair work in Japan, Grasp returned to Pearl Harbor l0 October and remained there until sailing for the States 29 January 1952. After quick repairs at San Diego, Grasp returned to Pearl Harbor 12 March and from there steamed to Subic Bay, Philippines, for salvage operations. She reach Sasebo again via Pearl Harbor 16 August and immediately returned to her duties of a month of patrol and rescue work along the Korean coast followed by a month of salvage and repair work in Japan. Returning to San Diego 22 May 1953 for local operations and repair work, Grasp sailed to Pearl Harbor 19 July and was there when the armistice came 27 July.

Despite the termination of open warfare Korea was to remain an important port of call for Grasp as the salvage ship's peacetime duties settled into a pattern of yearly WesPac cruises out of Pearl Harbor intermixed with local operations and salvage work out of the Hawaiian port. As she sailed each year to join the 7th Fleet in its massive peacekeeping and patrol work in the western Pacific Grasp visited such Asian ports as Yokosuka, Taiwan Hong Kong, Manila, Okinawa, and Eniwetok. America's participation in the struggle against communism in Vietnam added Saigon to this list in 1963. and Grasp was also at Johnston Island in the spring of 1962 in connection with nuclear weapons tests being conducted there. Another break in the pattern came in 1956 and again in 1957 as Grasp sailed north to participate in Aretic resupply and salvage operations in the icy Alaskan waters. Between October 1964 and March 1965 she conducted yet another deployment to the Western Pacific for salvage operations out of the Marianas and the Philippines. After returning to Pearl Harbor in mid-March, she was assigned to salvage and towing duty out of Guam, Marianas. Departing Pearl Harbor 2 November, she reached Guam the 27th. Since that time she has operated out of Guam to the Philippines and Southeast Asian waters and has continued to provide rescue and salvage facilities to ships of the powerful 7th Fleet.

Grasp was awarded two battle stars for World War II service.


24 Cars That Made America

American automotive history isn’t just about impressively brawny engines. Or irresistibly curvaceous chrome. Or the reliable, practical vehicles that move steadily off the lot. That’s why our �rs That Made America” list draws from all those categories𠅊nd from the duds as well.

Because in the brutally competitive auto industry, the Edsels and Vegas can be as important as the Model Ts and Mustangs. Sometimes ideas thrown at the wall stuck. Other times they slid slowly to an ignominious grease puddle on the floor. But each time, the entrepreneurs, marketers, designers, engineers and managers who guided American automobile production learned something. Failures (and there were many) often informed later successes. Clunkers could beget crowd-pleasers.

In this rundown of influential American cars, we see visionary engineers scheming ways to go faster and farther, in greater comfort and style. We see brand wizards tapping deep into the national psyche, evoking core American values of freedom, self-reliance and practicality. The cars here range from plain and utilitarian to sporty and fun to fantastically opulent. Many were testosterone-fueled under the hood, while others had to go up the hills backward.

This subjective list reflects a varied cross-section of a century&aposs worth of American automobile development.

WATCH: Full Episodes of The Cars That Built the World online now.

A 1901 advertisement for the Oldsmobile Runabout.


Contents

After fitting out at San Francisco, California, and shakedown along the California coast out of San Diego, California, Grasp sailed for the Pacific Ocean, reaching Hawaii 27 October 1944. From Pearl Harbor she headed for combat, reaching Manus, Admiralty Islands, 24 December to prepare for her role in the upcoming Lingayen Gulf operations. Joining the battle group, under the overall command of Admiral T. C. Kincaid, Grasp sailed for the Philippines 1 January 1945.

Kamikaze attacks [ edit ]

En route, the ships were attacked by heavy concentrations of Japanese aircraft, including the suicidal kamikazes. Overcoming all attacks, in which Grasp shot down one plane and assisted against others, the fleet forced its way deep into enemy waters and landed General Douglas MacArthur's troops at Lingayen Gulf 9 January. Grasp was there to assist battle damaged ships, and clear the harbor of sunken craft. In addition to aiding USS War Hawk (AP-168) and Otis Skinner, damaged by the Japanese, Grasp pulled two landing craft off the beaches and salvaged a Japanese Army submarine Yu 3 hazardous to shipping.

Philippine Islands operations [ edit ]

From Lingayen Gulf, Grasp sailed to Tacloban Harbor, Philippines, with an injured APD, Brooks (APD-10), in tow. There she joined TG㻎 and on 29 January 1945 participated in the initial landings at Zambales Luzon. After helping to make this another of the Fleet's long role of successful amphibious assaults, Grasp sailed to Manila Harbor 2 March. As part of the harbor clearance force under Commodore W. A. Sullivan, she remained in the Manila area for over a year. Grasp salvaged sunken ships in the harbor and also made emergency repairs to various naval and merchant ships. Departing the Philippines 27 April 1946, she reached San Pedro, California, via Pearl Harbor and Astoria, Oregon, 5 June. Grasp decommissioned there 12 December 1946 and was placed in reserve.


March 27, 2018

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Robotics at the University of Pennsylvania

The year 1961 saw robotics leave science fiction and enter the real world. Vijay Kumar, the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering with appointments in the departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science, and Electrical and Systems Engineering, says General Motors installed its first robot to handle steel ingots that year, which gave birth to industrial robotics. These were awkward machines that had to be bolted down to the shop floor. “Things had to be brought to the robot, the robot would do X, Y, or Z task, and then the applications would have to be taken away,” Kumar says.

It wasn’t until the 1980s that engineers began to make robots mobile—adding legs or wheels—allowing them to travel to a task for the first time. “Robots could go to applications, and the whole world is your laboratory potentially,” Kumar says. “That not only opened up opportunities, but it also raised the ante because now you had to incorporate in the robot the ability to reason about its surroundings and infer something about where it was in the environment.”

That innovation came just a few years after the founding of the GRASP Lab, established in 1979 by Ruzena Bajcsy, former chair and professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Pennsylvania.

Ruzena Bajcsy (center), former chair and professor of computer science and engineering, with other members of the GRASP Lab, circa 1984. Bajcsy founded the GRASP Lab in 1979.

“Ruzena Bajcsy was a pioneer,” says Dan Lee, director of the GRASP Lab and a professor with appointments in the departments of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Computer and Information Science, and Bioengineering. “Being a woman in the computer science and engineering field was unheard of back in the ’70s. She was putting together computer systems that could see, and could be controlled to look around in different places. That’s where it started. This is before we were even thinking in terms of ‘robotics’—this was a bunch of computer scientists who were thinking about different ways to control cameras, and what to do with the information that you get from them.”

“[Bajcsy is] still active in the field, and she has been a visionary,” adds Dan Koditschek, the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Electrical & Systems Engineering. “She created and mentored a young group of faculty who emerged with her who were some of the most important, most exciting people in the field. The place got off to a really strong start at the very foundation of robotics.”

Initially, robotics was a discipline rooted in computer science. In the ’80s, digital cameras were available, but had low resolutions and were too expensive for academics to use in research. The computers available to control them were equally limited the smartphones of 2014 have faster computational speeds and better memory densities than those early computers that were the size of filing cabinets.

As robotics entered the 󈨞s, sensor technology was dramatically impacted by the introduction of microelectromechanical systems, when the same technology used to miniaturize electronic circuitry was used on silicon chips to develop smaller mechanical sensors.

There were a number of mechanical advances, as well, enabling roboticists in the 2000s to think beyond the traditional two-dimensional nature of robots, finding ways to send them above ground and into water.

GRASP Lab projects in the 1990s: When this video was made in the 1990s, the core mission of the GRASP Lab was to “apply solid physical and mathematical principles toward the solution of practical engineering problems”—much as it still is today. This video highlights some projects during the decade, including 3D reconstruction of environments and objects for use in simulations and rapid prototyping, new ways of giving robotic systems sensory inputs and ways of cooperating, airborne and underwater locomotion systems, and early wearable computers for use in assistive devices.

The field continued to expand to include experts from the disciplines of both electrical and mechanical engineering.

One of those roboticists was Kumar, who served as director of the Lab from 1998 to 2004.

“We [at the GRASP Lab] were doing interdisciplinary research long before anyone knew what that meant,” says Kumar, who has been at Penn for 25 years. “When it [began], it started in computer science. I was the first mechanical engineering person to come in, and when I was director, by the end, we had roughly one-third mechanical engineers, one-third computer scientists, and one-third electrical engineers. To me, that mix was very important.”

Today, that mix is the backbone of robotics at Penn.

“We have great faculty from many different departments— ESE [Electrical and Systems Engineering], CIS [Computer and Information Science], MEAM [Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics], and even beyond Engineering, like the Medical School—that are put all together in one place,” says Lee, who has been at Penn since 2001. He’s served as director of the GRASP Lab for a little more than a year. “Then we recruit students from the entire spectrum—undergrad, masters, Ph.D.s, postdocs. That’s because robotics is an exciting field to be in—there’s opportunity to form connections to industry, government, alumni, youth, the whole gamut.” But it provides more than just opportunities—the interdisciplinary approach to robotics spearheaded by the GRASP Lab forges real innovations, with real applications. “The thing that makes the GRASP Lab really wonderful is the culture of collaboration,” says Mark Yim, a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics. “It’s co-located in the sense that we have this one big space where all of our, or most of our, Ph.D. students reside. I think there are very few places that have enough of a critical mass, in terms of professors that are all doing robotics on the different areas at the same time.”

  • Summer 2010
  • Summer 2009
  • Spring 2008
  • Fall 2007
  • Spring 2007
  • Fall 2006
  • Spring 2006

ROBOTICS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA was produced and developed by the following individuals from the Office of University Communications:


Post-Korean War operations [ edit | edit source ]

Despite the termination of open warfare Korea was to remain an important port of call for Grasp as the salvage ship's peacetime duties settled into a pattern of yearly WestPac cruises out of Pearl Harbor intermixed with local operations and salvage work out of the Hawaiian port. As she sailed each year to join the U.S. 7th Fleet in its massive peacekeeping and patrol work in the western Pacific, Grasp visited such Asian ports as Yokosuka, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Manila, Okinawa, and Eniwetok. America's participation in the struggle against communism in Vietnam added Saigon to this list in 1963. And Grasp was also at Johnston Island in the spring of 1962 in connection with nuclear weapons tests being conducted there.

A reasonable speculation of the Grasp was the recovery of both US and Soviet ICBM reentry vehicles from depths down to 20,000 feet. It was from this experience that the plan to raise a Soviet submarine, the Jennifer Project, was launched.


About jGRASP and jGRASP Plugins

jGRASP is a lightweight development environment, created specifically to provide automatic generation of software visualizations to improve the comprehensibility of software. jGRASP is implemented in Java, and runs on all platforms with a Java Virtual Machine (Java version 1.8 or higher). jGRASP produces Control Structure Diagrams (CSDs) for Java, C, C++, Objective-C, Python, Ada, and VHDL Complexity Profile Graphs (CPGs) for Java and Ada UML class diagrams for Java and has dynamic object viewers and a viewer canvas that work in conjunction with an integrated debugger and workbench for Java. The viewers include a data structure identifier mechanism which recognizes objects that represent traditional data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, and hash tables, and then displays them in an intuitive textbook-like presentation view.

jGRASP plugins for IntelliJ (IDEA and Android Studio) and Eclipse add the viewer and canvas features to those IDEs. For IntelliJ, the viewers and canvas will also work with Kotlin (JVM) code.


Grand Rapids Academic Summer Program (GRASP)

GRASP is a summer math and reading correspondence program for children finishing grades Kindergarten through 8th. Teachers and curriculum professionals developed GRASP as a cost efficient substitute for traditional summer school. The program seeks to help students retain skills learned during the past school year by providing review exercises. Grades K through 3rd get packets, but Grades 4-8 can choose online or packets.

Children successfully completing (70% accuracy) at least seven lessons are awarded a certificate, and those successfully completing all nine lessons receive a medal.

There are over 10,000 students enrolled annually in the GRASP program. These students are from many different districts in Michigan. Also, many students from other states are also involved in GRASP.

For more information, please click on our GRASP quick links listed on our page. Enroll today by clicking Enroll Online or Enroll Via Mail listed on our quick links.

Lori Peterson
Program Director
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Grasp ARS-24 - History

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Crop Genetics and Breeding Research: Tifton, GA

Coastal bermudagrass is still among the best perennial pasture and hay grasses for much of the Southeast. Success with it requires proper management. Here = s how:

Coastal bermuda will grow on any reasonably well drained soil from sands to heavy clays if properly limed and fertilized.

1. Plant only in moist, well-prepared, fertilized (500 lbs. 6-12-12 per acre), weed-free soil. Keep fallowed and plant immediately after a rain.

2. Plant only pure, live sprigs as soon as possible after a rain.

3. Set sprigs erect with part deep to get moisture and tip showing above soil.

4. Control weeds. Spray with 2,4-D (2 lbs/A) or Simazine (2 to 3 lbs/A) immediately after sprigging.

5. Fertilize by broadcasting 100 lbs N/A as soon as runners develop.

6. Graze lightly or cut hay first year.

1. (Winter) Test soil and lime to keep pH above 5.5 and correct severe deficiencies.

2. (Late February) Burn when first shoots emerge to control winter weeds, spittlebug and other pests.

3. (Mid-March) Broadcast first application of N-P-K.

4. Fertilize only enough to produce the grazing (30 to 200 lbs N/A) or forage (200 to 600 lbs N/A) needed.

5. Pound for pound of N, ammonium nitrate and nitrate of soda are best. Ammonium sulfate requires 3 times as much lime to correct acid residue. Urea N is 80% as good because of N loss to air from urease activity. The lag in response to anhydrous NH 3 will cut first hay yield a half-ton or more.

6. P and K are essential. A 4-1-2 ratio of N-P 2 0 5 -K 2 0 is usually an adequate minimum. Be sure there is at least 1 pound of K 2 0 per 2 pounds of N applied.

7. Split N and sometimes P and K applications for best results.

8. Minor elements are rarely needed.

1. Graze close for maximum carrying capacity.

2. Graze light enough to allow some grass to accumulate for maximum daily gains.

3. Fertilize and mow to keep a surplus of young, succulent grass for milking cows.

4. Carry less than 4 animals per acre to keep parasites down and get best gains.

GREEN-CHOP MANAGEMENT FOR MILK COWS

1. Fertilize with 400 lbs N/A/year plus adequate P and K.

2. Start green-chopping forage early and cut every 21 days thereafter.

3. Chop grass as short as possible.

4. Chop and feed morning and night.

1. Fertilize with 200 to 400 lbs of N/A plus adequate P and K.

2. Take first cut when grass is about 18 inches high and cut every 4 to 5 weeks thereafter.

3. Use the calendar and never let more than 6 weeks elapse between cuts.

4. Six-week cuts give maximum annual yields. Hay 4, 6, and 13 weeks old gives daily gains of 1.2, .9, and 0.

5. Avoid rain, if possible. One rain can cut the nutritive value of the hay one-third.

1. Fertilize as for hay and cut and chop as short as possible every 4 to 5 weeks.

2. Pack tightly in an airtight silo without allowing grass to wilt.

3. Add 100 lbs of ground corn or citrus pulp per tone to make top-quality silage.

4. Such high-protein silage, fed with lower-protein concentrates, has been about equal to corn silage at Clemson University.

MANAGEMENT FOR PELLET PRODUCTION

Pelleting improves the efficiency with which Coastal bermuda is converted to animal products and increases daily gains over grazing 20 to 30%.

1. Fertilize and cut at least as frequently as recommended for hay.

MANAGEMENT FOR CAROTENOID-PIGMENT PRODUCTION

Coastal bermuda meal is equal, or superior, to alfalfa meal as a source of carotene and xanthophyll. To produce it:

1. Fertilize with 600 lbs of N plus P and K annually.

2. Cut every 21 to 24 days. Pigment and protein content drops rapidly with age.

3. Dehydrate, pellet and store with inert gas till fed.

MANAGEMENT FOR LEGUME ASSOCIATIONS

1. Choose a well-adapted legume. Crimson clover is frequently best.

2. Graze close or burn off old grass.

3. Lime soil to above pH 6.5 and apply 500 lbs of 0-10-20 plus 10 lbs of borax each fall.

4. Plant 15 to 20 lbs of inoculated seed of Dixie or other reseeding variety after rain in late fall. Moisten seed with syrup to hold inoculum.

5. Introduce bees and restrict spring grazing for maximum seed yields. One colony of bees per 3 acres should increase yields 4 fold. Good seed yields every year are necessary for reseeding.

6. Top-dress, if at all, with no more than 100 lbs/A of N during the summer.

1. Adequate fertilization and utilization usually give satisfactory weed control.

2. Apply 1 to 2 lbs/A of the amine salt of 2,4-D to control most broadleafed weeds and annual grasses not germinated. Apply when weeds are small for best results.

1. Burn in late winter to control spittlebug.

2. Control armyworm when small with 4 oz/A of Parathion or 2 lbs/A of Sevin. Do not graze for 15 days after spraying Parathion.

Coastal bermudagrass has shallow rhizomes and although it produces heads, they rarely contain seed. Frequently only one disk-tilling during dry weather will completely eradicate it. The disk-tiller must be set deep enough to cut under the rhizomes and separate them from their roots.


Your View: Don’t let Mideast peace slip from our grasp again

Twenty-eight years ago, in 1993, I accompanied Lehigh Valley Congressman Paul McHale on a mission to the Middle East. Paul and I had a close working relationship the previous year. I was working for Bill Clinton’s presidential campaign in the Lehigh Valley, and Paul was running for Congress.

That summer, I accompanied Paul, who was part of a delegation of 10 members of Congress who traveled to Israel. It was an extraordinary time, including dialogue with Israel’s key government leadership, Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Benny Begin, a major figure in the Likud Party.

Paul met with Israeli military leaders and with the U.S. ambassador to Israel. He also traveled into East Jerusalem to speak to Palestinian leaders, in order to gain a balanced perspective.

Toward the end of the trip, we were invited into Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin’s office for a briefing. Rabin appeared somber as he advised the congressional delegation that, after months of secret meetings with Palestinian leadership, a peace treaty was at hand.

We were astounded and joyful.

I remember Rabin’s words now, with tears in my eyes: “I never want to tell another Israeli mother that her son has died in this awful conflict. I don’t want Palestinian mothers to weep anymore . it is enough.”

In September 1993, Rabin met with Palestine Liberation Organization Chairman Yasser Arafat and Clinton at the White House. There was the famous handshake.

Ultimately, an agreement was signed requiring additional negotiation. I remember the optimism I felt as both an American and a Jew and recall energetic discussions regarding economic development in the region and the broader use of medical facilities of Israel.

It was a moment of much promise with the prospect of real peace.

Despite grand intentions, apparently “enough was not enough” for some. The agreement collapsed.

Rabin was assassinated and the two narratives — one Israeli and one Palestinian — continued as they do today, each with its own real justification, history of oppression, suffering and religious underpinning.

In the years since, the far right in Israel has become ascendant. They have expanded settlement populations in the West Bank and in traditional East Jerusalem.

It appears their ultimate aim is to undermine the possibility of a two-state solution.

While Israel has gained military and economic strength, the Palestinian population has fared poorly. Movement within the West Bank, both to and from it, has become almost impossible, even for the 100,000 Palestinians who must travel into Israel for work daily. There is massive unemployment.

Economic and educational opportunity is limited. With increasing population density in Gaza, access to basic human services like clean water and electricity is substandard.

This ugly occupation fails both Palestinians and Israelis. By limiting Palestinians’ self-rule and continuing the oppressive conditions, Israel’s right wing has undermined its nation’s decency and has helped incite the very terrorism they seek to prevent.

The right-wing policies, which have flourished since the 1993 peace process was derailed, have not enhanced Israel’s overall security — they have made it more precarious. When will enough truly be enough?

Many American Jews are relieved by the ceasefire between Israel and Hamas and grateful to the Biden administration and others in the international community who helped facilitate it. We mourn the loss of life and the destruction. Ultimately, we need a fundamental reset of U.S. policy to make a two-state solution possible again.

We must call on the Biden administration to strongly voice its opposition to Israel’s creeping annexation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem. American taxpayer dollars should not fund aggressive settlement policies on the West Bank.

We must push Israel to cease onerous restrictions on Gaza and usher in major humanitarian assistance for the suffering. We must see to it that a political solution is negotiated that ends the occupation and guarantees the political rights, safety and self-determination of both Israelis and Palestinians.

In 1993, we had an opportunity to leave behind the unjust status quo in the region. Instead, there has been 30 years of suffering, violence, peril and instability.

Once again, we have a chance at lasting peace. We must not let it slip from our grasp.


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