Cobbler SS-344 - History

Cobbler SS-344 - History

Cobbler

The kill fish of New South Wales.

(SS-344: dp. 1,526, 1. 311'9"; b. 27'3"; dr. 16'3", s. 20
k.; cpl. 66; a. 10 21" tt.; cl. Gato)

Cobbler (SS-344) was launched 1 April 1946 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn.; sponsored by Mrs. J. B. flutter; commissioned 8 August 1945, Commander J. Grady in command.

Cobbler arrived at Key West 11 January 1946, for operations locally and in the Caribbean for exercises and training until 27 November 1948. She then sailed for Groton, arriving 1 December to be modernized. Conversion completed 17 August 1949, she departed Groton 24 August for Norfolk, her home port from the time of her arrival, 27 August. She conducted operations in Florida and Caribbean waters and along the east coast visiting Quebec 10 to 14 September 1953, and returning to Norfolk 19 September. On 27 March 1954 she cleared Norfolk for 3 weeks of operations under the control of the Operational Development Force, cruising with units of the Canadian navy and air force from Bermuda to Nova Scotia.

Her operations in the Caribbean and off the east coast continued, until 6 January 1958, when she departed Norfolk for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean, returning 18 April. She resumed operations off the east coast, cruising to Bermuda in June 1958, and to Quebec with midshipmen embarked in July 1959. From 9 September 1959 through 1960 she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet's Antisubmarine Development Force.


USS Cobbler (SS-344)

USS Cobbler (SS-344), a Balao-class submarine, was a ship of the United States Navy named for the cobbler, the killifish of New South Wales.

The Balao class was a successful design of United States Navy submarine used during World War II, and with 120 units completed, the largest class of submarines in the United States Navy. An improvement on the earlier Gato class , the boats had slight internal differences. The most significant improvement was the use of thicker, higher yield strength steel in the pressure hull skins and frames, which increased their test depth to 400 feet (120 m). Tang actually achieved a depth of 612 ft (187 m) during a test dive, and exceeded that test depth when taking on water in the forward torpedo room while evading a destroyer.

A submarine is a watercraft capable of independent operation underwater. It differs from a submersible, which has more limited underwater capability. It is also sometimes used historically or colloquially to refer to remotely operated vehicles and robots, as well as medium-sized or smaller vessels, such as the midget submarine and the wet sub. Submarines are referred to as “boats” rather than “ships“ irrespective of their size.

The United States Navy (USN) is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. It is the largest and most capable navy in the world and it has been estimated that in terms of tonnage of its active battle fleet alone, it is larger than the next 13 navies combined, which includes 11 U.S. allies or partner nations. With the highest combined battle fleet tonnage and the world's largest aircraft carrier fleet, with eleven in service, and two new carriers under construction. With 319,421 personnel on active duty and 99,616 in the Ready Reserve, the U.S. Navy is the third largest of the U.S. military service branches in terms of personnel. It has 282 deployable combat vessels and more than 3,700 operational aircraft as of March�, making it the third-largest air force in the world, after the United States Air Force and the United States Army.


Cobbler SS-344 - History

Click on photo for Muster Rolls

Tusk
An alternate name for the cusk, a large edible saltwater fish related to the cod.
(SS-426: dp. 1,570 (surf.), 2,415 (subm.) 1. 311'8" b. 27'3" dr. 16'5" (mean) s. 20.25 k. (surf.), 8.75 k. (subm.) cpl. 81 a. 10 21" tt., 1 5", 1 40mm., 1 20mm., 2 .50-cal. mg. cl. Balao, Tench Variant)
Tusk (SS-426) was laid down on 23 August 1943 at Philadelphia, Pa., by the Cramp Shipbuilding Co. launched on 8 July 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Carolyn Park Mills and commissioned on 11 April 1946, Comdr. Raymond A. Moore in command.


Tusk completed her shakedown cruise in the southern Atlantic with a round of goodwill visits to Latin American ports. She called at Rio de Janeiro and Bahia in Brazil in June and July 1946, Curacao in the Netherlands West Indies, and at Balboa, Panama also in July before returning to New London in August 1946. On November 16, 1946 while at the the US Naval Academy she was toured by President Harry S. Truman and Vice Admiral Aubrey W. Fitch. For the next year, she conducted operations along the east coast between New London and Wilmington, N.C. During the first month of 1947, Tusk participated in a fleet tactical exercise in the Central Atlantic. On February 12 she collided with the hospital ship USS Consolation AH-15 while attempting to surface, resulting in damage to her sail and masts. A three-month overhaul at Philadelphia followed by oceanographic work along the Atlantic shelf in conjunction with Columbia University and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute occupied her until October 1947 when she entered the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard for a "Guppy II" conversion.


Over the next seven months, Tusk received extensive modifications to improve her submerged performance characteristics. Four "greater capacity" batteries replaced her old larger ones. Her hull became more streamlined—the anchors were recessed into the hull and the propeller guards were removed—to improve her overall hydrodynamic design for underwater operations. Her sail was streamlined and enlarged to house the snorkel, a device added to allow her to operate on diesel power at periscope depth and to recharge her batteries while running submerged. All of these changes helped to convert Tusk from simply a submersible surface ship into a truer submarine. They increased her submerged range and, though she lost about two knots in surface speed, her submerged speed increased from just under 10 knots to about 15.


The newly converted submarine returned to active duty early in the summer of 1948. She conducted her shakedown training and made a simulated war patrol to the Canal Zone in June and July. She returned to the United States in August and visited the Naval Academy at Annapolis where her presence allowed about 1,000 fourth classmen to see at first hand the latest development in submarine design. That fall and winter, Tusk resumed normal operations, participating in exercises with other United States and NATO forces. She ranged from the Caribbean Sea in the south to above the Arctic Circle in the north. The beginning of 1949 brought a more restricted radius of operations. During the first six months of that year, she served with Submarine Development Group 2 based at Newport, R.I. In July, Tusk rejoined the multinational forces of NATO for another round of exercises in the North Atlantic. During these exercises, she visited Londonderry, Northern Ireland and Portsmouth, England.


During the final phase of those exercises, Tusk was operating in a unit which also included the submarine Cochino (SS-345). On 25 August 1949, while steaming through a gale off the coast of Norway, Cochino suffered an explosion in one of her batteries. Tusk rushed to the aid of the stricken submarine, providing medical supplies for Cochino's injured by way of life rafts. One such raft capsized in heavy seas sending a Cochino officer and a civilian employee of the Bureau of Ships into the icy Arctic waters. Both were recovered, but during the administration of artificial respiration on board Tusk, another wave broke over her deck washing away the civilian and 11 Tusk crewmen. Only four sailors were subsequently rescued. After those tragic events, Tusk and the limping Cochino headed for Hammerfest, Norway. Along the way, another explosion erupted in Cochino's after battery. The second detonation sealed Cochino's doom. Water literally poured through her battered hull. Tusk came alongside in heavy seas and lashed herself to the sinking submarine. Under the worst possible conditions, Tusk took all of Cochino's crew off safely. Minutes later Cochino took her final plunge and Tusk headed for Hammerfest.


That fall, the submarine returned to the United States to resume east coast operations out of New London in support of the Submarine School. She made cruises north to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and south to Bermuda. 11/09/49: The USS Tusk (SS-426) is rammed while submerged by the USS Aldebaran (AF-10) 175 miles off Labrador, Newfoundland, Canada. The submarine suffers damage to its periscope and superstructure. Her duty with the Submarine School continued until the middle of 1951 when she was assigned once more to Submarine Development Group 2. That assignment, punctuated by regular exercises with the fleet, continued until the summer of 1952 when she returned to an operational unit, Submarine Squadron (SubRon) 10. Normal east coast duty out of New London lasted until late in the year. In the spring of 1953 Tusk was deployed to the Mediterranean for a six-month tour with the 6th Fleet, visiting Malta, Gibraltar, Cannes France, Piraeus Greece, Izmir Turkey and Oran Algiers. Her return to the United States brought more local operations out of New London. During the first part of 1954, the submarine operated in the Caribbean. Then, after four months of local operations out of New London, she sailed for northern European waters. That tour brought port visits to Belfast, Ireland and Glasgow, Scotland as well as training exercises with NATO forces in the northern Atlantic.


The first four years of the 1950's established the pattern for the remainder of Tusk's Navy career. She saw four additional Mediterranean deployments between 1954 and 1973. Initially, however, a long stretch of east coast operations intervened between overseas deployments. On August 7, 1957, the USS Cobbler (SS-344) and USS Tusk (SS-426) were slightly damaged after an underwater collision during maneuvers off New Jersey. On June 29, 1959 she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for repairs and maintenance, leaving in November. In New London, CT on December 4, 1959 Tusk hosted a cruise with 50 Midshipmen from Yale's Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps.

Tusk left New London on January 18, 1960 and conducted ship to ship exercises with USS Entemedor (SS-340) out of Norfolk, VA. On January 23-25, 1960 she welcomed visitors at City Pier #5 in Washington DC. March 1960 found Tusk participating with USS Tench (SS-417) in the artic for Operation ICEX and visiting Halifax, Nova Scotia. Six years elapsed between her 1954 northern Europe assignment and her second Mediterranean cruise late in 1960. During this cruise (July 6-7, 1960) she participated in a Joint Naval exercise with three Portuguese Frigates (Nuno Tristao, Diogo Gomes and Corte Real) visited Oporto, Portugal (July 8-11, 1960) to help celebrate "Navy Day" events and commemoration ceremonies related to the 500th anniversary of Prince Henry the Navigator. Later visiting Rota, Spain Malta Genova, Sardegna, Livorno, Fiumicino during the Olympic games, Naples, Sicily, Cagliari, Italy and Gibraltar. One event of that cruise was a submerged collision with the USS Independence CVA-62, destroying the Tusk's forward torpedo boom and capstan and damaging the teak decking. Tusk returned to New London in December 1960 for a 6 week upkeep repairing engine #4 by replacing 2 broken crank shafts.

The fall of 1961 brought another round of NATO exercises followed by joint American-Canadian training operations in the western Atlantic. January 1962 found Tusk in upkeep prior to heading north with SKATE (SS-578) and ENTEMADOR (SS-340) for SUBICEX 1-62. One purpose of the exercise was to train SKATE for a rendezvous at the North Pole in the summer with the SEA DRAGON coming from Pearl Harbor. After ICEX Tusk conducted local operations going to Halifax and Bermuda for liberty until entering Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in July 1962. This yard period was a major overhaul for TUSK. All 4 engines, all 4 generators, and all 4 main propulsion motors were removed from the ship and taken to the shop for complete overhaul. Number 4 engine was scrapped and an overhauled replacement engine was placed aboard. The superstructure from the sail aft was replaced with the new plastic clamshell superstructure. She received a new periscope with built in electronic sextant for taking star sights submerged. Toward the end of the overhaul, an experimental sonar was placed aboard just forward of the sail.

Another three-year period of New London-based local operations occurred before she was deployed again to Europe in the fall of 1964 for more NATO training. TUSK entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in June 1965 to undergo a major overhaul. Her configuration was changed with the addition of a new high plastic conning tower fairwater, the purpose of which is to provide room for more electronic masts, provide easier visual observation of the deck, and greater comfort for the TUSK's watchstanders. In addition, TUSK received the PRAIRIE-MASKER system, increased air-conditioning capacity, additional storerooms, and additional fresh water tanks. Upon completion of overhaul in January 1966, TUSK was transferred from Submarine Squadron TEN to Submarine Squadron EIGHT. During the spring and summer of 1966, Tusk returned to the Mediterranean for her third tour of duty with the 6th Fleet, visiting Gibralter- Valletta, Malta- Naples- Patrais- Greece- Barcelona and Palma, Mallorca. August 1966 brought a resumption of duty in American coastal waters which lasted until early 1967.

During the summer of 1967, the submarine returned to northern European waters, visiting Holy Loch, Scotland Portsmouth, England Cherbourg, France Bremerhaven, Germany Aarhus, Denmark Goteborg, Sweden Londonderry, Northern Ireland and participating in yet another series of multinational NATO exercises. That November, she joined in binational American-Canadian exercises in the western Atlantic before resuming her east coast routine. The boat spent the summer of 1968 in the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for an extensive overhall where the batteries were replaced, engines removed and rebuilt, all systems were gone over and boat was painted inside and out, later conducting services with nuclear-powered submarines Jack (SSN-605) and Lafayette (SSBN-616).

January 27, 1969 until March 10 she participated in Operation Springboard visiting San Juan and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, V.I. On July 7, 1969 she made her fourth deployment to the Mediterranean, traveling across the Atlantic with USS Sea Owl (SS-405) and USS Irex (SS-482) arriving in Rota, Spain on July 19. She spent 4 days in Gibralter B.B.C. and conducted exercises with the Sixth Fleet. August 15-19, 1969 found Tusk in dry dock in Rota followed with trips to Naples, Italy and Palma de Mallorca, Spain.Returning to east coast operations in October. On December 1, 1969, TUSK was transferred to Submarine Squadron TWO.

March 9, 1970 thru April 15 Operation Springboard

November 13, 1970 Halifax, Nova Scotia

February 27, 1971 St. Thomas, Virgin Islands

March 1971 Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico

May 16-21, 1971 Royal Bay, Bermuda- Tusk participated in Type Training evolutions, alternating exercise firings and target services with USS Corporal (SS-346). St. Georges, Bermuda

June 1971 Dependent's Cruise Nahant, MA

July 12, 1971- December 21, 1971 Charleston, SC

February 1972 Norfolk, VA- Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico

March 1972 Charlotte Amalie Harbor, St. Thomas, V.I.- San Juan, Puerto Rico- Savannah, GA

May 28, 1972 Memorial Day Service, Pier 94, New York Harbor, NY

August 1972 Rota, Spain- Palma Mallorca, Spain- Levkas, Greece- Ormas (Fanari,Sivota) Greece

September 1972 Ithaki Island, Greece- Naples, Italy- Nice, France- Ibiza, Spain- Rota, Spain

November 27, 1972 Drydocked

March 1973 Charleston, SC- Guantanamo Bay, Cuba- Ocho Rios, Jamaica- Port au Prince, Haiti- Montego Bay, Jamaica

April 1973 West Palm Beach, FL

May 1973 Halifax, Nova Scotia- Memorial Day, Manhattan Island, NY,NY

May 30, 1973 Republic of China crew arrived to commence training for turnover

The submarine rounded out the final year of her career with normal operations along the eastern seaboard, primarily in the New England vicinity. On 18 October 1973, Tusk was decommissioned at New London, Conn., and was simultaneously transferred, by sale, to the Taiwan Navy. Her name was struck from the Navy list on the same day and she remains in service as Hai Pao (792).

Since 1946 the Commanding Officers of the USS TUSK were:

CDR RAYMOND A. MOORE ( 04/11/1946-04/25/1946 )

CDR MARSHALL G. AUSTIN (04/25/1946-1948 )

Commanded USS Redfin SS 272

April 11, 1944 Destroyer "Akigumo"

April 15, 1944 Passenger-cargo "Shinyu Maru"

April 16, 1944 Passenger-cargo "Yamagata Maru"

June 11, 1944 Tanker "Asanagi Maru"

June 24, 1944 Passenger-cargo "Aso Maru"

Nov 8, 1944 Tanker "Nichinan Maru No 2"

CDR GUY F. GUGGLIOTTA ( 1948-1949 )

Commanded USS Halibut SS 232

Commanded USS Raton SS 270

CDR ROBERT K. WORTHINGTON ( 1949-1951 )

Commanded USS Balao SS 285

March 18, 1945 Trawler " Daito Maru No.2"

March 19, 1945 Transport "Hakozaki Maru"

"Daito Maru No.1, Katsura Maru No.1, Eiho Maru No.1 and Eiho Maru No.2"


USS Cobbler (SS-344)

Cobbler (SS-344) was launched 1 April 1945 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Connecticut sponsored by Mrs. J. B. Rutter commissioned 8 August 1945, Commander J. B. Grady in command.

Cobbler arrived at Key West 11 January 1946, for operations locally and in the Caribbean for exercises and training until 27 November 1948. She then sailed for Groton, arriving 1 December for a GUPPY II modernization being completed on 17 August 1949. She departed Groton 24 August for Norfolk, her home port from the time of her arrival, 27 August.

She conducted operations in Florida and Caribbean waters and along the east coast visiting Quebec 10 September to 14 September 1953, and returning to Norfolk 19 September. On 27 March 1954 she cleared Norfolk for 3 weeks of operations under the control of the Operational Development Force, cruising with units of the Canadian navy and air force from Bermuda to Nova Scotia.

Her operations in the Caribbean and off the east coast continued, until 6 January 1958, when she departed Norfolk for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean Sea, returning 18 April. She resumed operations off the east coast, cruising to Bermuda in June 1958, and to Quebec with midshipmen embarked in July 1959. From 9 September 1959 through 1960 she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet's Antisubmarine Development Force.

In 1962, Cobbler became one of only nine boats to undergo the GUPPY III conversion. She had a 15-foot (4.6 m) hull extension added forward of the control room, a plastic sail and the BQG-4 PUFFS passive ranging sonar, which included the three sharkfin sensors on her deck.


Cobbler

A shoe cobbler is a person who mends and repairs shoes. The profession has been around for most of human history. Some people assume that cobblers and shoemakers (called cordwainers in England) are the same profession, and while that may be true today, it wasn’t always so.

At one time, shoemakers/cordwainers were the skilled artisans tasked with making shoes out of brand new leather, while cobblers were the ones who repaired shoes. In fact, cobblers were forbidden from working with new leather and had to use old leather for their repairs. The difference between the two trades was once considered so vast, it was a serious insult to call a shoemaker a cobbler (the latter of which, not so coincidentally, is a term that also means to work clumsily or bungle).

The shoemaking and cobbler trades were forced to merge around the beginning of the 19th century when the introduction of mass manufactured shoes left shoemakers out of work and having to accept lower paying repair jobs.

Some of the earliest styles of shoes made in human history include sandals and moccasins. Wooden shoes, pegged construction shoes and English welted shoes came later.

The first English cordwainers to arrive in America came in 1607 and settled in Jamestown, Virginia.

Notice concerning medical entries:

Articles having medical content shall serve exclusively for the purpose of general information. Such articles are not suitable for any (self-) diagnosis and treatment of individual illnesses and medical indications. In particular, they cannot substitute for the examination, advice, or treatment by a licensed physician or pharmacist. No replies to any individual questions shall be effected through the articles.


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Cobbler SS-344 - History

From: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships Cobbler

The killifish of New South Wales. SS - 344: dp. 1,526 l. 311'9" b. 27'3"

dr. 15'3" s. 20 k. cpl. 66 a. 10 x 21" tt.

Cobbler (SS-344) was launched 1 April 1945 by Electric Boat Co., Groton, Conn. sponsored by Mrs. J. B. Rutter commissioned 8 August 1945, Commander J. B. Grady in command.

Cobbler arrived at Key West 11 January 1946, for operations locally and in the Caribbean for exercises and training until 27 November 1948. She then sailed for Groton, arriving 1 December to be modernized. Conversion completed 17 August 1949, she departed Groton 24 August for Norfolk, her home port from the time of her arrival, 27 August. She conducted operations in Florida and Caribbean waters and along the east coast visiting Quebec 10 to 14 September 1953, and returning to Norfolk 19 September. On 27 March 1954 she cleared Norfolk for 3 weeks of operations under the control of the Operational Development Force, cruising with units of the Canadian navy and air force from Bermuda to Nova Scotia.

Her operations in the Caribbean and off the east coast continued, until 6 January 1958, when she departed Norfolk for a tour of duty in the Mediterranean, returning 18 April. She resumed operations off the east coast, cruising to Bermuda in June 1958, and to Quebec with midshipmen embarked in July 1959. From 9 September 1959 through 1960 she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet's Antisubmarine Development Force.


A Brief History Of Peach Cobbler

Cobblers were never meant to be pretty. Emerging as a makeshift version of the ever-popular pie recipe circulating Europe and the United States in the 1800s, this dessert was ‘cobbled’ together by the early American settlers using fruit – usually preserved, canned, or dried – and clumps of biscuit dough before baking it over an open fire.

During the early years of European settlement, many Dutch and English immigrants brought traditional pie recipes with them to the New World, adapting to what was available to them in America. As settlers moved westward in the early 19th century, access to fruit – peaches, plums, cherries – typically grown on the East Coast became increasingly more difficult. And while recipes for pie had circulated throughout the lands, travelers on the road had to make do with what they had: dried, canned, or syrup-preserved fruit, chemically leavened dough (using baking powder), and an open fire.

The cobbler is said to have been an improvisation of the much-loved pie into a trail-modified dessert. Fruit, however it came, was dumped into a Dutch oven, topped with globs of biscuit dough, and baked over an open fire until golden brown. Cobblers were quickly integrated into the settler diet, many choosing to eat the sweet dish for breakfast, as a first course, or as a main dish – it wasn’t until the late 19th century that the cobbler was officially labeled as a dessert.

Peach cobbler is believed to have come together in the same way as the first cobblers did: fruit, dough, and an open fire. Today, peach cobbler is a traditional dessert served in the Deep South, usually accompanied by a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Other versions of the cobbler – tart, pie, torte, pandowdy, sonker, grunt, slump, buckles, crisp, croustade, bird’s nest pudding, and crow’s nest pudding – have elements in common (fruit, butter, sugar, and flour), but the recipe for a true cobbler remains nearly the same as ones that the American settlers used. By the 1950s, peach cobbler had become an American dessert staple, and in an effort to sell more canned peaches, the Georgia Peach Council declared April 13th National Peach Cobbler Day.


Nuclear Submarines Undergoing SRP (Ship/Submarine Recycling Program) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton Washington.

This page was saved from http://www.donshelton.net/djs-srp1.htm which is no longer on the air. So, we cleaned it up as best we could, and most of the images will pop up.

Some of the images were never available to begin with, and regrettably the original article had teensy weensie images, so what you see is what you get. This is a typical run-on web page you'd see back in the early days of the internet when people would cobble together a web site and it's pretty awful, but it has historical value. We stripped out as much awfulness as we could. Enjoy.


Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Bremerton Washington is the only shipyard in the US that recycles Nuclear Ships and Submarines .

Some arrive under their own power, others are defueled and decommissioned at other sites, then towed to PSNS. East coast ships/subs transit the Panama Canal under tow.

(Click to See ex USS Narwhal SSN-671 being towed (dead boat tow) through the Panama Canal in April 2001.) Photo is published with permission.

When a ship/sub is selected for recycling, it is first "Inactivated". This means the process of scrapping is started. It is placed in dry dock and fuel is removed from the Nuclear Reactor. The ship/sub is still in commission (even though inactivated) and is referred to as USS (Name). Once the fuel is removed, the ship is decommissioned and referred to there after by name only, or ex-name. (i.e. Ex Ray, Ex James Madison)

Presently, submarines are completely scrapped once they enter the dry-dock. They are no longer refloated. Once a submarine enters the dry dock, their fate is sealed. Only scrap metal leaves the dry-dock. No surface craft have been recycled yet, but four are waiting in line with everything above the main deck removed.

Submarines are scrapped from the inside out. Large holes are cut in the sides so dumpsters can be inserted. Inside the submarine, like materials are placed in dumpsters. When full, the dumpsters are removed and replaced. At the same time, the outer hull is removed in large sections. Once the outer hull is gone, the pressure hull is cut up and removed. The submarine is cut into just forward and aft of the reactor compartment. The ends are sealed thus making the reactor compartment completely intact and sealed including the pressure hull and outer skin. This sealed section is removed from the dry-dock and placed on a barge for transfer to Hanford Washington for burial.

During my harbor tour I was able to spot the following submarines. George Washington (598), Skipjack (585), Drum (677), Ray (653) [my old boat] , Lapon (661), Richard B. Russell (687), Nathanael Greene (636), Andrew Jackson (619), Von Steuben (632), Omaha (692), Cincinnati (693), Woodrow Wilson (624), Silversides (679), Sea Devil (664), Aspro (648), Ethan Allen (608), Haddock (621), Sculpin (590), and Triton (586).

Who are they?
1. L to R 693, 692, 632, 619, 636
2. 624
3. 586 Triton
4.R to L 677, 675, 653( my boat!) , 661, 687
5.Top down, 687, 661, 653 , 675, 677
6. Top down, 621, 608, 648, 664, 679
7. All of the above plus (L to R) CGN-38, CGN-39, CGN-9)
8. Top down, 586, 590

This scrap was seen through the fence. MSW *** valve, escape trunk, sail about three feet high, rudder in train car, pieces of hull sections, diesel engines. CLICK on image to see larger version. Sections were loaded on trailers, and train cars. One train car was marked "250,000 lbs.".*** I received the following email from Steve Massie regarding the large sea valves. I bet Steve is right! "hey don take it from an old a-ganger, im pretty sure those are not msw
valves but rather tdu muzzle ball valves from a 616 era boat, in the
pictures of parts on rail cars from scrapped boats.
steve massie ssbn 628,ssbn740
Two reactor compartments can be seen on barges. These barges will take the sealed reactor compartments to Hanford Washington where they will be buried. This is the pit at Hanford where the sealed reactor compartments are being buried. As you can see, a large number of submarine reactor compartments are already there.

The torpedo tubes, impulse tanks, and section of pressure hull in the first photograph were taken from USS Tecumseh (SSBN 628). This is the heaviest display in the museum.

Sources used to gather information for this page Signalman/Quartermaster Chief (SS) Jack Rhoten (USN ret.)
Chief Rhoten has the distinction of being the last Signalman to serve aboard submarines. In fact he reported aboard his first boat (USS Cobbler SS-344) as Chief Signalman (SU) and filled a Quartermaster billet. (imagine, a non-qual chief!) He also served aboard USS Cutlass SS-478. Jack gave us a tour of the harbor in his boat and let me use his telephoto lens to get some of the close shots. A great story teller and most gracious host, Jack's contribution made the surface shots possible for this page. Chief Rhoten retired in 1967. Pegasus Air, Inc
Bremerton National Airport, 8850 State Hwy 3 SW, Port Orchard, WA 98367, 800- 294-2542. They Have Floatplane Charters as well as custom sight seeing tours. (very reasonable rates!) We toured the shipyard, Bremerton Submarine Base, Delta Pier where the Tridents are parked, plus a very scenic tour of the area. (1 hour total) Our pilot was Brian Landburg. Kitsap Harbor Tours.
This tour includes access to the restored Turner Joy (DD-951) and a boat tour of the Bremerton Harbor. This is your source for photographs of the fleet. 290 Washington Ave, Bremerton, WA. (360) 377-8924 PSNS Armed Forces Day Open House
No Photographs allowed, but I did get to see a lot and gather information to add text to this page. Naval Undersea Museum
Garnett Way, Keyport, WA, 98345-7610 (360) 396-4148. This is where the Sturgeon sail, and Greenling control room are along with lots of torpedoes and a very extensive library on the third deck you can use for research, large theatre. 1000 - 1600 daily, May - Sept, Closed Tuesdays, Oct - April. Bremerton Naval Museum
130 Washington Ave. Bremerton, WA, 98337 (360) 479-7447. Photographs plaques, artifacts from the Navy . The Author of this page
Don Shelton fmr ET1(SS)
This does not classify as a concealed weapon under the Texas Carry Laws! Return to my home page.
ver: 01 Mar 2003


Crumble

A crumble is essentially a crisp, but it can have a slightly different texture. Greenspan’s version includes chopped nuts, though many recipes stick with only butter, sugar, and flour, maybe with some warm spices like cinnamon or nutmeg. The topping might be sandier than a crunchy crisp, or have big clumps rather than an equally distributed crisp topping. Our new peach and sesame crumble recipe is somewhere in between the two with sesame seeds adding even more texture within the clumps.

The Oxford Companion to Food says that “it seems probable that [the crumble] was developed during the Second World War.” The topping may have been inspired by streusels found in Austria and Central Europe, the topping for a rich tea bread or cake called streuselkuchen.

The rule for choosing fruit for a crumble remains the same as with a crisp: Whether stone fruit or berries, it can’t hurt them to be softer, as they need less time in the oven before the topping is cooked through and golden brown on top.

So what’s in a name? That which we call a cobbler by any other name would taste as damn good.


Watch the video: Loake Badminton Detailed Restoration. New Footbed. Executive Resole #30. Scottish Shoe Repair