Vammen DE-644 - History

Vammen DE-644 - History

Vammen

(DE-644: dp. 1,400, 1. 306'0", b. 37'0", dr. 9'5" (mean); s. 23.5 k., cpl. 186 a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 10 20mm. 3 21" tt., 2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.); cl. Buckleg)

Vammen (DE-644) was laid down on 1 August 1943 at San Francisco, Calif., by the Bethlehem Steel Co.; launched on 21 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Earle Morgan, aunt of the late Ens. Vammen, and commissioned on 27 July 1944, Lt. Comdr. L. M. King, Jr. USNR, in command.

Following commissioning, Vammen fitted out through mid-August 1944 and later conducted her shakedown out of San Diego, Calif., into late September before undergoing a post-shakedown availability at her builder's yard. Underway for Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, on 13 October, the new destroyer escort convoyed SS Phillipa to the Hawaiian Islands before reporting for duty to Commander, Service Force, Pacific, on 21 October.

For the remainder of October and all of November the destroyer escort trained out of Pearl Harbor, operating in company with various submarines and aircraft carriers, perfecting techniques of antisubmarine warfare and escort duty. She then escorted SS Cushman Davis via Funafuti in the Ellice Islands to Espiritu Santo, before she steamed independently to Pearl Harbor, arriving at the Pacific Fleet's main base three days after Christmas 1944.

Vammen plane-guarded for Batuan (CVL-29) early in January 1945 before escorting the merchantman SS Extra, to Eniwetok in the Marshalls from 9 to 16 January. While returning to Pearl Harbor, Vammen responded to a radio request for assistance from LSTS98 which had an ill crewman. The destroyer escort rendezvoused with the landing ship at sea on 20 January and took the sick man on board. The following day, off Johnston Island, Vammen transferred the man to a hospital boat, sent from that outpost, for medical treatment ashore. The destroyer escort arrived baek at Pearl Harbor on the 23d.

At the end of the month, Vammen sailed for the Marshalls, escorting Convoy PD-278-T, consisting of the attack transports Montrose (APA-212) and Mountrail (APA-213). Departing Pearl Harbor on 30 January, PD-278-T arrived at Eniwetok on 7 February. Vammen then headed for Hawaii the next day and, on the 10th, relieved Witter (DE-667) as escort for the escort carriers Kilkun Bag (CVE-71) and Salamana (CVE-96) en route. They subsequently reached Pearl Harbor on the 17th

The destroyer escort conducted one more convoy escort run to the Marshalls before she participated in her first major action. She shepherded PD-310-T— the attack transports Meriwether (APA-203), Menard (APA-201), and Allendale (APA-127)—from 22 February to 2 March, the day of their arrival at Eniwetok.

Three days later, she (as one of nine escorts) sortied with a 10-ship convoy bound for Ulithi and Kossol Roads. Detached on 9 March, she escorted the merchantman SS Westward Ho to Kossol Roads and, two days later, departed the Palaus and proceeded to the Philippines in company with the landing ship Ozark (LSV-2) and Westward Ho, reaching Rizal, Leyte, on the 13th.

After patrolling the entrance to Leyte Gulf from 14 to 18 March, Vammen underwent an availability at San Pedro Bay alongside tender Markab (AD-21). With those repairs completed within a week's time the destroyer escort sortied on 25 March, bound for Okinawa and her baptism of fire.

Steaming as part of the screen for Tractor Group "Easy," Vammen reached the Ryukyus on 1 April, the day of the initial landings on Okinawa. Detached from duty with Task Unit (TU) 51.14.2—for which the ship's commanding officer had been screen commander —Vammen was assigned to the western half of screening station A-39. Later that day, she received orders to screen LST Group "Dog" during its night retirement. While maneuvering at 15 knots through the congested transport area under poor visibility conditions, the destroyer escort struck a heavy floating object with her bow at 2100. A few seconds later, an explosion occurred beneath her stern, as though a depth charge had exploded under the ship.

After noticing marked vibrations, Vammen reduced speed to 10 knots. Repair parties reported no evident damage, but the vibrations indicated damage to shafts or propellers. As it turned out, the ship's starboard propeller had been damaged and required replacement. Nevertheless, she completed hr assigned mission proceeding to rendezvous with the LST group on its night retirement.

At 0645 the next day, she resumed her screening station, A-39, but because of her reduced speed capacity, was ordered to take station A-50. Fortunately for Vammen, she was never attacked by enemy aircraft.

Vammen remained on station off Olsinawa until 8 April. Due to the frequent enemy air raids, her crew spent an average of 10 to 12 hours a day at their general quarters stations, but, as Comdr. King noted in his report of the ship's operations, "no undue fatigue or effect on morale or efficiency" resulted. Offered no opportunity to fire at enemy aircraft during her time off Okinawa, Vammen conducted two "hedgehog" attacks on suspected submarine contacts, neither with observable results.

With the additional problem of a burnt-out drive motor in her surface-search (SL) radar, Vammen departed Okinawa on 8 April, screening LST Group 17 to Leyte. Arriving at San Pedro Bay on the 14th, she underwent repairs alongside Markab before she was drydocked in AD-16 to have the damaged starboard propeller replaced. Undocking on the 17th, Vammen returned to Okinawa at the end of April, screening LST Group 41.

Detached from that escort duty on 2 May, Vammen received orders to head for the scene of a submarine sighting at 1514 on the 5th. She arrived on the scene at 1723 and commenced a search plan in company with Halloran (DE 305), but found nothing. The ships abandoned the search at 1100 the following day, and Vammen soon resumed her screening role off Okinawa.

The destroyer escort remained off Okinawa, screening incoming ships and off transport areas, for the rest of May. On 28 May, while anchored at the northern end of the transport area in Hagushi Bay, Vammen picked up TBS reports of incoming aircraft— "bogies"—commencing beyond 50 miles. A short while later, the destroyer escort's radar picked up one enemy plane, a "Tony," first at 10 miles and then one mile away as it circled across the ship's bow.

The "Tony" suddenly emerged from the low clouds on the escort's starboard quarter, and all of Vammen's 20-millimeter Oerlikons that could bear opened up, joining the other ships nearby in putting up a fierce barrage of fire. The "Tony" strafed a tug nearby but —hit the tail and right wing—burst into flame, lost altitude, and crashed into the water without exploding, clear of any ships.

Underway on 3 June, Vammen—awarded an "assist" in the downing of the plane on 28 May—escorted an Okinawa-to-Leyte convoy between 3 and 8 June, sinking a Japanese mine with gunfire en route. After repairs alongside Markal' and a docking in ARD-18 for repairs to her sound gear—which had been inoperative since 22 May—the destroyer escort sailed for Lingayen in company with sistership Cole (DE-641), on her way back to Okinawa.

For the remainder of June, Vammen performed the unglamorous but vital duty of screening transports and of providing local • escort services to incoming convoys. She ultimately departed the Ryukyus in early July and steamed to Ulithi before returning once more to Okinawa on the 16th, commencing patrol at station D-1, off Buckner Bay, on the 22d.

Subsequently returning to Ulithi in early August the destroyer escort returned to Okinawa on the 12th and, after fueling, got underway on the 13th, as part of the screen for an Okinawa-to-Ulithi convoy. It was while underway with that convoy two days later that the ship received the welcome news of Japan's capitulation. Vammen's commanding officer recorded the event: "1745, On basis of communique No. 467, all offensive action against Japanese ceased."

Vammen reached Ulithi on the 18th and, after escorting Convoy UOK (Ulithi to Okinawa) 52 to Okinawa from 27 to 31 August, returned to Ulithi at the beginning of September. Subsequently visiting Guam and Saipan, Vammen reached Pearl Harbor on 9 November on her way back to the west coast of the United States.

The ship underwent a lengthy availability at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash., that lasted into 1946. She shifted southward to San Diego and departed that port on 20 February, bound for the EIawaiian Islands, reaching Pearl Harbor on 27 February. She sailed from Oahu on 4 March and proceeded via Guam to China.

Vammen supported the American occupation forces in their operations from the spring of 1946 into the autumn touching at ports such as Tsingtao and Shanghai, China; and Kowloon. Departing Shanghai on 1 July 1946, the destroyer escort reached Pearl Harbor on 16 July via Guam and Eniwetok. She then set out for the west coast, reaching San Diego on 28 July.

The destroyer escort next underwent an availability at Terminal Island, Calif., and San Pedro in early September and shifted to San Diego in mid-month. Vammen was subsequently decommissioned at San Diego on 3 February 1947 and placed in reserve. She was inactivated on 2 April 1947.

The Korean War meant a new lease on life for Vammen; she was reactivated and heavily modified to enable her to perform a specialized antisubmarine warfare (ASW) role. With a redesigned bridge, trainable forward-firing ASW projectors ("hedgehogs") and improved sonar capabilities, Vammen thus became one of the most modern ASW vessels in the Fleet.

Recommissioned at Mare Island, Calif., on 15 February 15~52, Vammen operated off the west coast, out of San Diego and in the southern California area into the summer of the following year, training. On 19 July 1953, she left San Diego behind, bound for her first deployment to the Western Pacific (WestPac) since her recommissioning

After proceeding via Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Yokosuka, Vammen arrived at Sasebo, Japan, on 23 August but got underway the next morning for the key port of Wonsan on the eastern coast of North Korea. She operated off Wonsan, performing patrol and gunfire support duties, from 25 August to 17 September before she returned to Sasebo.

Vammen returned to Wonsan at the end of October and, after performing a second tour of gunfire support and patrol there, returned to the west coast of the United States. Departing Wonsan on 11 November the destroyer escort reached San Diego on 2 December via the Shimonoseki Straits, Yokosuka, Midway, and Pearl Harbor.

Over the next six years, Vammen alternated in training operations off the eoast of California—operating primarily out of San Diego—and conducting regular WestPac deployments.

The latter provided her with excellent training opportunities. In 1955 and again in 1958, she made cruises through the Western and Central Carolines, the Bonins, the northern Marianas, and the Volcano Islands, parts of the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands administered by the Navy. She kept a figurative "eye" on local conditions on the various atolls and islands, keeping a lookout for illegal activities in trading and shipping. Her surveillance missions varied in format. On some occasions, she would send a landing party ashore via motor whaleboat or outboard motor-powered rubber raft, and, on other occasions, Vammen would remain offshore while her men scanned the island with binoculars. During the former a pharmacist's mate (the ship's doctor) would aceompany the landing party to provide medical care and advice for the sick.

On another occasion, while enroute to WestPac in company with LeRay Wilson (DE-414), Vammen visited Port Lyttleton, New Zealand, the seaport for Christchurch. From 3 to 8 February 1958, the two destroyer escorts remained there, while Vammen transferred 51 sacks of mail destined for Operation "Deepfreeze" personnel in Antarctica.

In April 1960, Vammen was selected as a Group I Naval Reserve Training (NRT) ship, on 21 May, she was redesignated a Grotlp II NRT ship. On 18 June 1960, the destroyer escort was decommissioned and placed "in service."

After becoming an NRT ship, Vammen soon began to provide training for reserve surface divisions of the 11th Naval District. Those men came on board for both dockside and underway training. On the third weekend of each month and for two weeks each summer Vammen embarked her selected reserve crew. She then conducted ASW, gunnery, and other shipboard training drills off the coast of California between Long Beach and San Diego. In August 1960, Vammen conducted her first annual two-week training cruise with her selected reserve crew embarked. For her performance during those evolutions, the destroyer escort received the highest grade assigned to an NRT ship of her type.

She subsequently conducted her second two-week cruise the following summer, 1961, ready for instant mobilization that came sooner than anyone in her crew probably realized. That autumn, the Cold War tensions that escalated over Berlin and in the Far East resulted in the reactivation of 40 NRT ships for active

duty. Accordingly, on 2 October 1961, Vammen was recommissioned at Long Beach, Comdr. Charlie S. Nelson, USNR, in command.

Following her recommissioning, Vammen underwent her regularly scheduled overhaul at the Todd Shipyard. Transferred to Pearl Harbor as her new home on 15 December 1961, Vammen sailed for another WestPac deployment on 6 January 1962. She deployed with a hunter-killer group and arrived at Pearl on the 12th. She began refresher training soon thereafter.

Assigned to Escort Division (CortDiv) 72, Vammen sailed for the Philippines on 24 February. After logistics stops at Midway and Guam for fuel and minor voyage repairs the destroyer escort reached Subic Bay on 11 March. ifter a brief period of upkeep, Vammen visited Manila in company with Marsh (DE 699) and Charles E. Brannon (DE-446) from 16 to 18 March. On the 19th, the three ships got underway for the Gulf of Siam.

Arriving off the southern tip of South Vietnam on 21 March, Vammen and Charles E. Brannon relieved Wiseman (DE '667) and Edmond$ (DE-406) on the following day and assumed the duties of training units of the small South Vietnamese Navy in that area. From that day until 9 April, Vammen remained on station in the Gulf of Siam, off the coast of South Vietnam, maintaining American presence in that area. Heavy pressure from communist Viet Cong forces inside South Vietnam had brought about a commitment of force there as the United States sought to bolster the American-backed regime. After visiting Subic Bay for a week of upkeep and conducting a port visit to Hong Kong, Vammen returned to her station in the Gulf of Siam. Originally, the ship's schedule had called for the ship to visit Japan and return to Pearl Harbor after visiting Hong Kong, but—as Vammen's commanding officer reported ". the efforts of Vammen and the other ex-NRT ships on the South Vietnam training mission were apparently of such value that it was decided to retain Escort Division 72 on the mission through mid-May."

There were further changes of plan afoot for Vammen, as was evidenced during the second deployment in the Gulf of Siam. On 13 May, Vammen at~d Charles E. Brannon were diverted from their training duties under Task Force 72 and were ordered to report for duty to commander, TG 76.5. Complyin~, the two destroyer escorts subsequently screened Valley Forge (LPH-8), Navarro (APA-215), and Point Definance (LSD-31) while that group took a Marine Corps expeditionary force to Bangkok, Thailand. The 3d Battalion, 9th Marines, embarked in the amphibious group were sent to Thailand in an effort to provide the friendly regime with troops to deter any communist moves across the Mekong River. Following that operation, Vammen and her sistership escorted TG 76.5 back to Subic Bay, arriving there on the 23d.

Vammen subsequently visited Yokosuka, Japan, and participated in Exereise "Powerdive"—with 7th Fleet units in the Japan area—before she returned via Midway Island to her home port, Pearl Harbor, on 18 June. At Pearl from 18 June to 11 July Vammen enjoyed the longest consecutive in-port periol since February of that year, undergoing much-needed repairs and maintenance. On 11 July, Vammen, in company with Colahan (DD-658), Marsh, and Wiseman, sailed for the west coast of the United States.

After her arrival at Long Beach on 17 July, Vammen was decommissioned on 1 August, resuming her role as an NRT ship. For the next seven years, Vammen continued her duties as an 11th Naval District NRT ship based at Long Beach, and operating primarily in the Long Beach-Los Angeles-San Pedro area. During that time, she ranged as far north as British Columbia and as far south as Ensenada, Mexico. Age ultimately caught up with the veteran destroyer escort, and, in the summer of 1969, she was adjudged unfit for further Service.

Placed out of service on 12 July 1969, Vammen's NRT crew was transferred to Maddoa; (DD-731); and the ship herself was turned over to the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, San Diego. Struck from the Navy list on 12 July 1969, Vammen's stripped hulk was utilized in a "Condor" missile test on 4 February 1971 and, as a result of the damage suffered on that date, sank on 18 February.

Vammen (DE-644) earned one battle star for her World War II service and one engagement star for her Korean War service.


USS Vammen (DE-644)

USS Vammen (DE-644) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, named in honor of Ensign Clarence E. Vammen, Jr. (1919–1942), a naval aviator who died in the Battle of Midway.

Vammen was laid down on 1 August 1943 at San Francisco, Calif., by the Bethlehem Steel Corporation launched on 21 May 1944, sponsored by Mrs. Earle Morgan, aunt of the late Ensign Vammen and commissioned on 27 July 1944, with Lieutenant Commander L. M. King, Jr., USNR, in command.


Uss Vammen De 644 - T-Shirt

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Vammen DE-644 - History

Buckley Class Destroyer Escorts
USS England DE-635

Kit consists of 177 plastic parts on 9 sprues plus a photoetch part.
Completed kit measures over 10" long.
Kit# DC177 - $33.00

MS-21 8/19/43-8/26/43 San Francisco
MS-32 5/11/44-5/17/44 Manus
MS-11 1/9/45-1/12/45 Ulithi
MS-14 6/25/45-6/29/45 San Diego

1/350 USS Solar DE-221 as a plastic kit 10" long very detailed.
Built by Dave Judy this is a resin kit.
Change the hull#'s and build any ship of the class!

Oklahoma was moored Battleship Row 7, outboard alongside Maryland. USS Oklahoma took 3 torpedo hits almost immediately after the first Japanese bombs fell. As she began to capsize, 2 more torpedoes struck home, and her men were strafed as they abandoned ship. Within 2O minutes after the attack began, she had swung over until halted by her masts touching bottom, her starboard side above water, and a part of her keel clear.

Ensign England survived the initial attack and escaped topside as the ship was capsizing. He remembered the men still in the radio room. He returned three times to the radio room, each time guiding a man to safety. He left to go back below decks for the fourth time and was never seen again. He was one of twenty officers and 395 enlisted men were killed on board USS Oklahoma that morning. Ensign England's gallant effort saved three, but cost him his life.


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USS Vammen DE 644

"Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

(Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It shows your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed) .

The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

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USS Enterprise CV-6 The Most Decorated Ship of the Second World War

To date, we know of 43 [1] ships named to honor crewmen, aviators and officers who served with honor in Enterprise CV-6. These ships are listed below, along with links to their complete entries in the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS), which has been made available online by Andrew C. Toppan and the team at Haze Gray & Underway.

I'm indebted to Bill Vickrey for his help in compiling this list, in particular those ships named after participants in the Battle of Midway (4-6 June 1942).

The List Continues to Grow: Note the addition of Pinckney DDG-91, launched 29 June 2002.

[1] This list includes only commissioned vessels. Several vessels - including Delbert W. Halsey DE-310, Ely DE-309 and John J. Van Buren DE-753 - were cancelled before commissioning, and are not listed. Also, USS Spruance DD-963, named for Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, whose flagship at Midway was Enterprise CV-6, is not included in this list.

USS Acree DE-167 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: May 9, 1943
Commissioned: July 19, 1943
Decommissioned: April 1, 1946
Named for LT(jg) John W. Acree, who died while leading a damage control party in Enterprise, during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. [ Top]


USS Acree DE-167 in her wartime configuration, named for LT(jg) John W. Acree, killed in action at the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942.

USS Brock APD-93 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: January 20, 1944, as DE-234
Commissioned: February 9, 1945, as APD-93
Decommissioned: May 5, 1946
Named for ENS John W. Brock of Torpedo Squadron Six: killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. [ Top]

USS Collett DD-730 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 5, 1944
Commissioned: May 16, 1944
Decommissioned: December 18, 1970
Named for LCDR John A. Collett, commanding officer of Torpedo Squadron Ten, killed in action during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. [ Top]

USS Dennis DE-405 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 4, 1943
Commissioned: March 20, 1944
Decommissioned: March 31, 1946
Named for Otis L. Dennis RM 3/c, a Scouting Six radioman, killed in action during the February 1, 1942 Marshall Islands Raid. Dennis was cited posthumously for his conduct as the aerial gunner in the plane piloted by LT(jg) Carleton Fogg during the raid. [ Top]

USS Doherty DE-14 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: August 29, 1942
Commissioned: February 6, 1943
Decommissioned: December 14, 1945
Named for ENS John Doherty, a pilot in Bombing Squadron Six, killed in action during the February 1, 1942 Marshall Islands Raid. He received posthumously a special letter of commendation from the Secretary of the Navy for his devotion to duty and disregard of his own safety in accomplishing his mission in addition to the Distinguished Flying Cross. [ Top]

USS Donnell DE-56 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 13, 1943
Commissioned: June 26, 1943
Decommissioned: October 23, 1945
Named for ENS Earl R. Donnell, a Scouting Six pilot, killed in action during the February 1, 1942 Marshall Islands Raid. For his courage in pressing home his attack in the face of enemy fighter opposition and heavy anti-aircraft fire, he was posthumously awarded the Air Medal. [ Top]

USS Doyle C. Barnes DE-353 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 4, 1944
Commissioned: July 13, 1944
Decommissioned: January 15, 1947
Named for ENS Doyle C. Barnes, a pilot in Fighting Six. Barnes received a Navy Cross for downing two enemy torpedo planes on June 4, 1942 while defending Yorktown CV-5 at the Battle of Midway. In August of that year, he was killed in action by a "friendly" 5" anti-aircraft shell during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, as he led an attack on enemy dive bombers poised to strike Enterprise. [ Top]

USS Eversole DE-404 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 3, 1943
Commissioned: March 21, 1944
Sunk October 28, 1944, off Leyte Gulf.
Named for LT(jg) John T. Eversole of Torpedo Squadron Six, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. He was recognized posthumously with the award of the Navy Cross. [ Top]


USS Eversole DE-404, named for LT(jg) John T. Eversole, killed in action at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942.

USS Fogg DE-57 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 20, 1943
Commissioned: July 7, 1943
Decommissioned: October 27, 1947
Named for LT(jg) Carleton T. Fogg, a Scouting Six pilot, killed in action during the February 1, 1942 Marshall Islands Raid. Fogg was awarded the Air Medal posthumously for his gallant conduct in the face of heavy enemy opposition. [ Top]

USS Eugene A. Green DD-711 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 18, 1946
Commissioned: June 8, 1946
Decommissioned: August 31, 1972
Named for ENS Eugene A. Green of Bombing Squadron Six, lost at the Battle of Midway June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. He was recognized posthumously with the award of the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Hilbert DE-742 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: July 18, 1943
Commissioned: February 4, 1944
Decommissioned: June 19, 1946
Named for Ernest L. Hilbert AOM 3/c, rear seat gunner in Bombing Squadron Six. On the morning of June 4, 1942, during the Battle of Midway, Hilbert enabled his pilot to escape devastating fighter attacks by skillful and continuous fire from his free machine guns. While pursuing the same bold tactics in an attack against the Japanese carrier Hiryu later that day, Hilbert and his pilot, LT(jg) Frederick T. Weber, were shot down. Hilbert was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, posthumously. [ Top]

USS Hodges DE-231 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 9, 1943
Commissioned: May 27, 1944
Decommissioned: June 22, 1946
Named for ENS Flourney G. Hodges, a Torpedo Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Hodges was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.). [ Top]

USS Holder DE-401 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: November 27, 1943
Commissioned: January 18, 1944
Decommissioned: September 13, 1944
Named for LT(jg) Randolph M. Holder, a Torpedo Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Holder was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Holder DD-819 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: August 25, 1945
Commissioned: May 18, 1946
Stricken: October 1, 1976
Named for LT(jg) Randolph M. Holder, a Torpedo Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Holder was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Holt DE-706 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: February 15, 1944
Commissioned: June 9, 1944
Decommissioned: July 2, 1946
Named for LT(jg) William M. Holt, a Fighting Six pilot. Holt served in Enterprise Air Group through the first seven months of war, including Midway. Later transferred to the VF-5 detachment deployed on Saratoga CV-3, Holt was killed in action while defending against an enemy air attack during the Marine landings on Guadalcanal, August 7, 1942. Holt was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Hopping DE-155 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 10, 1943
Commissioned: May 21, 1943
Decommissioned: May 5, 1947
Named for LCDR Halstead L. Hopping, commanding officer of Scouting Six, killed in action during the February 1, 1942 Marshall Islands Raid. LCDR Hopping was the first U.S. Navy aircraft squadron commander to lose his life in World War II. [ Top]

USS Jaccard DE-355 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 18, 1944
Commissioned: July 26, 1944
Decommissioned: September 30, 1946
Named for ENS Richard A. Jaccard, a Scouting Six pilot. Jaccard, who joined Enterprise Air Group in April 1942, flew in both the morning and afternoon strikes against the Japanese carrier force at Midway, June 4, 1942, scoring a definite hit on carrier Hiryu. For his performance in this battle, Jacard was awarded the Navy Cross. Jaccard was killed when Wasp CV-7 was torpedoed and sunk, September 15, 1942. [ Top]

USS Lindsey DM-32 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: May 5, 1944, as DD-771
Commissioned: August 20, 1944, as DM-32
Decommissioned: May 26, 1946
Named for LCDR Eugene E. Lindsey, commanding officer of Torpedo Squadron Six. Lindsey, who flew despite injuries sustained in a landing accident shortly beforehand, was killed in action while leading Torpedo Six's attack on the Japanese carrier force at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Lindsey was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously. [ Top]

USS Lough DE-586 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: January 22, 1944
Commissioned: May 2, 1944
Decommissioned: June 24, 1946
Named for ENS John C. Lough, a Scouting Squadron Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Lough was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS McAnn DE-179 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: September 5, 1943
Commissioned: October 11, 1943
Decommissioned: August 15, 1944
Named for GM 1/c Donald R. McAnn, killed in action during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. During the fierce air battle, McAnn took valuable photographs from an exposed position on the forward port .50 caliber gun mount. While relieving one of the gunners, he was struck by an exploding bomb fragment and fatally wounded. For his unstinting bravery in the face of hostile action, McAnn was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously. [ Top]

USS McClusky FFG-41 (No DANFS Entry)
Launched: September 18, 1982
Commissioned: December 10, 1984
Active in the Pacific Fleet
Named for then-LCDR Clarence Wade McClusky, Enterprise Air Group Commander at the Battle of Midway, June 4-6, 1942. One June 4, with many planes in his attack group low on fuel and the enemy fleet nowhere in sight, McClusky made the critical decision to fly the reverse of the expected enemy course. This decision led directly to the discovery of the Japanese carrier force, and the subsequent destruction of two carriers by McClusky's group. For his performance at Midway, McClusky (who retired as RADM) was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. [ Top]

USS Menges DE-320 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: June 15, 1943
Commissioned: October 26, 1943
Decommissioned: January, 1947
Named for ENS Herbert H. Menges, killed by friendly fire in Pearl Harbor the evening of December 7, 1941. Menges was the first US Navy fighter pilot to die in the Pacific War. While approaching Hickam Field after dark, with five other VF-6 aircraft, Menges' plane was brought under "friendly" fire by ships in the harbor as well as land-based anti-aircraft batteries. With Menges dead or incapacitated, his plane plunged towards Pearl City, crashing into the veranda of a house at water's edge. Two other VF-6 pilots, LT(jg) Francis Hebel and LT(jg) Eric Allen were mortally wounded during the incident. [ Top]


USS William C. Miller DE-259, named for the eponymous Scouting Six radioman, killed in action at Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941.

USS William C. Miller DE-259 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: February 22, 1943
Commissioned: July 2, 1943
Decommissioned: December 17, 1945
Named for RM 1/c William C. Miller, a Scouting Six radioman, killed in action December 7, 1941, when planes from Enterprise CV-6 encountered Japanese attackers over Pearl Harbor. For his devotion to duty, despite wounds received in aerial battle, Miller was awarded a posthumous commendation by the Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet. [ Top]

USS O'Flaherty DE-340 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 14, 1943
Commissioned: April 8, 1944
Decommissioned: January 1947
Named for ENS Frank W. O'Flaherty, a Scouting Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. After his plane was damaged during the attack on the Japanese force, O'Flaherty and his rear seat gunner, Bruno P. Gaido AMM 1/c, ditched, and were picked up by the Japanese destroyer Makigumo. Both men were interrogated and then executed by drowning. O'Flaherty was awarded a Navy Cross posthumously. [ Top]

USS Peiffer DE-588 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: January 26, 1944
Commissioned: June 15, 1944
Decommissioned: June 1, 1946
Named for ENS Carl D. Peiffer, a Scouting Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Peiffer was awarded a Navy Cross posthumously. [ Top]

USS Pinckney DDG-91 (US Navy Info)
Launched: June 29, 2002
Commissioned: May 29, 2004
Named for William Pinckney Ck 2/c, recipient of the Navy Cross for heroic action during the Battle of Santa Cruz, 26 October 1942. Despite suffocating smoke, flames, and gasoline fumes, Pinckney rescued the only other survivor of a bomb blast which wrecked the ammunition handling room where six men including Pinckney had been stationed. [ Top]

USS Presley DE-371 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: August 19, 1944
Commissioned: November 7, 1944
Decommissioned: June 20, 1946
Named for AMM 1/c Sam D. Presley, killed in action during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. As Enterprise came under sustained enemy air attack, AMM 1/c Presley voluntarily abandoned the shelter of his normal battle station and climbed into a plane parked on the flight deck. Manning the flexible guns in the rear cockpit, he commenced fire against the attacking aircraft. As the battle continued, a bomb explosion blew the plane overboard. He received the Navy Cross for extraordinary heroism. [ Top]

USS Beverly W. Reid APD-119 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 4, 1944
Commissioned: June 25, 1945
Decommissioned: May 5, 1947
Named for ENS Beverly W. Reid, a Fighting Six pilot. At Midway, June 4, 1942, then-MACH Reid was credited with downing two Japanese torpedo planes attacking Yorktown CV-5, and awarded a Navy Cross for his performance. ENS Reid was killed in action at the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, August 24, 1942, defending Enterprise against enemy air attack. [ Top]

USS Rich DE-695 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: June 22, 1943
Commissioned: October 1, 1943
Sunk June 8, 1944, off Normandy, France.
Named for LT(jg) Ralph M. Rich, a Fighting Six pilot. Assigned to Enterprise Air Group in November 1940, Rich served with the squadron through the first seven months of the war, including the Battle of Midway, June 4-6, 1942. One June 4, Rich was credited with downing an enemy torpedo plane attacking Yorktown CV-5. Rich was killed in an airplane crash just two weeks later, and posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his performance at Midway. [ Top]

USS Riley DE-579 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 29, 1943
Commissioned: March 13, 1944
Decommissioned: January 15, 1947
Named for LT Paul J. Riley, a Torpedo Squadron Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Riley was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS John Q. Roberts APD-94 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: February 11, 1944 as DE-235
Commissioned: March 8, 1945 as APD-94
Decommissioned: May 30, 1946
Named for ENS John Q. Roberts, a Scouting Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Roberts was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]


USS Shelton DD-790, named for ENS James A. Shelton, killed in action at the Battle of Midway, June 4-6, 1942.

USS Shelton DE-407 (No DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 18, 1943
Commissioned: April 4, 1944
Sunk off Morotai, October 3, 1944.
Named for ENS James A. Shelton, a Scouting Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Shelton was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Shelton DD-790 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: March 8, 1946
Commissioned: June 21, 1946
Stricken: March 31, 1973
Named for ENS James A. Shelton, a Scouting Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Shelton was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Swearer DE-186 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: October 31, 1943
Commissioned: November 24, 1943
Decommissioned: August 27, 1947
Named for LT Walter J. Swearer, killed in action during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. [ Top]

USS Lloyd Thomas DD-764 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: October 5, 1945
Commissioned: March 21, 1947
Decommissioned: October 12, 1973
Named for LT(jg) Lloyd Thomas, a Torpedo Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942. Thomas was awarded the Navy Cross posthumously. [ Top]

USS Vammen DE-644 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: May 21, 1944
Commissioned: July 27, 1944
Decommissioned: August 1, 1962
Named for ENS Clarence E. Vammen, a Scouting Six pilot, killed in action during the Battle of Midway, June 6, 1942, during the attack on the Japanese cruisers Mikuma and Mogami. Vammen was posthumously awarded the Distinguishing Flying Cross. [ Top]

USS Vandivier DE-540 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 27, 1943
Commissioned: October 11, 1955
Decommissioned: June 30, 1960
Named for LT(jg) Norman F. Vandivier, a Bombing Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from an attack on the Japanese force. Vandivier was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) retroactive to April 15, 1942. [ Top]

USS Varian DE-798 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: November 6, 1943
Commissioned: February 29, 1944
Decommissioned: March 15, 1946
Named for ENS Bertram S. Varian Jr., a Bombing Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from the morning attack on the Japanese carrier force. Varian was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. [ Top]

USS Charles R. Ware DD-865 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: April 12, 1945
Commissioned: July 21, 1945
Stricken: July 1, 1974
Named for LT Charles R. Ware, a Scouting Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane failed to return from the morning attack on the Japanese carrier force. Ware was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross for his performance in the face of formidable anti-aircraft fire and fighter opposition at Midway. [ Top]

USS Weber DE-675 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: May 1, 1943
Commissioned: June 30, 1943
Decommissioned: January 1947
Named for LT(jg) Frederick T. Weber, a Bombing Six pilot, lost at the Battle of Midway, June 4, 1942, when his plane was shot down by enemy fighters during the afternoon attack on the Japanese carrier Hiryu. Weber was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross and promoted to Lieutenant (j.g.) retroactively. [ Top]

USS Wileman DE-22 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 19, 1942
Commissioned: June 11, 1943
Decommissioned: November 16, 1945
Named for ENS William W. Wileman, a Fighting Six pilot. Wileman served in Enterprise Air Group from May to August 1942, including the Battle of Midway, June 4-6, 1942. Later transferred to VF-5, Holt was killed in action on September 13, 1942, while defending Henderson Field, on Guadalcanal, against enemy air attack. [ Top]


USS Wyffels DE-6, named for Carpenter Lawrence E. Wyffels, killed in action at Santa Cruz, October 26, 1942.

USS Willis DE-395 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: September 14, 1943
Commissioned: December 10, 1943
Decommissioned: June 14, 1946
Named for ENS Walter M. Willis, a Scouting Six pilot. The plane manned by Willis and his gunner, Fred J. Ducolon, COX, disappeared the morning of 7 December 1941 near Pearl Harbor, and was probably shot down by enemy planes attacking the base. Neither Willis, Ducolon nor their SBD Dauntless were ever found. [ Top]

USS Wyffels DE-6 (DANFS Entry)
Launched: December 7, 1942
Commissioned: April 21, 1943
Decommissioned: September 25, 1945
Named for Warrant Carpenter Lawrence Edward Wyffels, killed in action during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, October 26, 1942. Wyffels earned a Silver Star for his actions during the Battle of the Eastern Solomons, 24 August 1942. During that battle, Wyffels courageously fought a blaze ignited by bombs and repeatedly entered burning compartments to rescue the wounded trapped inside. He was awarded the Silver Star less than two weeks before his death at Santa Cruz. [ Top]


Vammen DE-644 - History

Date: July 23, 1997 VAOPGCPREC 27-97

Subj: Service in the Republic of Vietnam for Purposes of Defini-
tion of Vietnam Era--38 U.S.C. § 101(29)(A)

To: Director, Compensation and Pension Service (213A)

Whether service on a naval vessel in the waters off the shore of Vietnam constitutes service in the Republic of Vietnam for purposes of 38 U.S.C. § 101(29)(A), which defines the Vietnam era as the period beginning on February 28, 1961, and ending on May 7, 1975, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period.

1. In the claim giving rise to the request for opinion, the veteran served aboard an aircraft carrier during the period November 1961 through at least June 1962. The veteran reported that during some part of that period the carrier was stationed off the coast of the Republic of Vietnam. The question arises whether such service may be considered wartime service for purposes of determining eligibility for improved pension.

2. Section 505 of the Veterans’ Benefits Improvements Act of 1996 (VBIA), Pub. L. No. 104-275, 110 Stat. 3322, 3342, amended the definition of “Vietnam era” in section 101(29) of title 38, United States Code, to refer to the period beginning on February 28, 1961, and ending on May 7, 1975, “in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period” and the period beginning on August 5, 1964, and ending on May 7, 1975, in all other cases. Prior to enactment of the VBIA, 38 U.S.C. § 101(29) had provided that the term “Vietnam era” meant the period beginning on August 5, 1964, and ending on May 7, 1975. See 38 U.S.C.A. § 101(29) (1991). Thus, under current section 101(29)(B), all service within the period August 5, 1964, through May 7, 1975, is considered service during the Vietnam era for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefit purposes, whether or not the service was performed in the Republic of Vietnam. Under section 101(29)(A), service during the period February 28, 1961, through August 4, 1964, may also be considered service during the Vietnam era, but only for veterans who “served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period.”

3. As the Supreme Court has instructed, "[t]he starting point in interpreting a statute is its language, for ‘if the intent of Congress is clear, that is the end of the matter.’" Good Samaritan Hosp. v. Shalala, 508 U.S. 402, 409 (1993) (alteration omitted) (quoting Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. National Resources Defense Council, Inc., 467 U.S. 837, 842 (1984)). Thus, interpretation of the phrase “served in the Republic of Vietnam” in 38 U.S.C. § 101(29)(A) must begin with the statutory language itself. We do not believe that the language of section 101(29)(A) conclusively resolves whether service in the waters off the shore of Vietnam is included in the statutory reference to service in the Republic of Vietnam. The definition in section 101(29)(A) does not specifically address whether service “in the Republic of Vietnam” was meant to include service in the waters off the shore of Vietnam. The term “in the Republic of Vietnam” is to some degree inherently ambiguous in that it may be subject to differing interpretations regarding whether it refers only to areas within the land borders of the Republic or also encompasses, for example, Vietnamese air space or territorial waters. See generally VAOPGCPREC 7-93 (O.G.C. Prec. 7-93) (“service in Vietnam” for purposes of 38 C.F.R. § 3.313 does not include high altitude missions in Vietnamese airspace). Accordingly, we find it necessary to look beyond the terms of the statute for a definitive answer to the question posed.

4. We note that, in 38 U.S.C. § 101(30), the term “Mexican border period” is defined to mean the period beginning on May 9, 1916, and ending on April 5, 1917, “in the case of a veteran who during such period served in Mexico, on the borders thereof, or in the waters adjacent thereto.” (Emphasis added.) While this language may suggest that the term “in Mexico” does not include service in the waters adjacent thereto in the absence of a clause specifically referencing such service, it may be that Congress felt it necessary to include the reference to adjacent waters to avoid what it perceived as ambiguity inherent in the term “in Mexico,” rather than from a conviction that the term did not include adjacent waters.

5. Because the language of section 101(29)(A) does not conclusively resolve whether service in the waters off the shore of Vietnam is included in the phrase “served in the Republic of Vietnam,” we will examine the statute’s legislative history to determine the intent of Congress. The report of the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs on the VBIA explains that “United States military personnel were, in fact, serving within the borders of the Republic of Vietnam prior to August 5, 1964, principally as advisors to the armed forces of the Republic of South Vietnam.” S. Rep. No. 371, 104th Cong., 2d Sess. 21 (1996), reprinted in 1996 U.S.C.C.A.N. 3762, 3772. The report indicates an intention to amend the definition of the Vietnam era to reflect “the date U.S. forces generally began to accompany their Vietnamese counterparts on combat operations.” Id. The report states that the amendment to section 101(29) would apply the expanded period “only with respect to those veterans who actually served within the borders of the Republic of Vietnam during that time frame.” Id. (Emphasis added.) In addition, Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs Chairman Alan K. Simpson, in discussing the provision on the Senate floor, stated that “U.S. troops were subjected to the real perils of ground combat at least as early as February 28, 1961. This bill would recognize that fact . . . .” 142 Cong. Rec. S11,779 (daily ed. Sept. 28, 1996).

6. It is clear from this discussion that Congress’ intent in amending the definition of the Vietnam era in section 101(29) was to include the service of veterans who actually served within the borders of the Republic of Vietnam during the period February 28, 1961, through August 4, 1964. Congress’ focus was on ground forces, and there is no suggestion that Congress intended to liberalize the “Vietnam era” definition with respect to naval personnel serving on deep-water vessels off the shores of Vietnam. Accordingly, we conclude that service on a deep-water vessel in waters off the shores of Vietnam may not be considered service in the Republic of Vietnam for purposes of the definition of “Vietnam era” in 38 U.S.C. § 101(29) as amended by section 505 of the VBIA.

7. We note that section 505(b) of the VBIA amended 38 U.S.C. §§ 1116 and 1710 to expand the period during which an individual could have served in the Republic of Vietnam in order to qualify for benefits under those provisions. Section 1116 provides presumptions of service connection for diseases associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents for certain veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam during the period January 9, 1962, through May 7, 1975, and also provides that a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period shall be presumed to have been exposed to a herbicide agent containing dioxin. Section 1710 provides for eligibility for hospital and nursing home care and medical services for herbicide-exposed veterans of service in the Republic of Vietnam during the specified period. The amendments to sections 1116 and 1710 substituted for the general definition of the Vietnam era for purposes of those provisions the period beginning on January 9, 1962, and ending on May 7, 1975. The legislative history of section 505(b) indicates that Congress intended that the applicable period of service reflect the period in which the herbicide agents and defoliants were introduced and present within Vietnam. S. Rep. No. 371, 104th Cong. 21, reprinted in 1996 U.S.C.C.A.N. at 3772. VA regulations, currently codified at 38 C.F.R. § 3.307(a)(6)(iii), on which the statutory presumption of exposure to herbicide agents was based, see former 38 C.F.R. § 3.311(a) (1990) (predating the statutory presumption added by Pub. L. No. 102-4, § 2(a), 105 Stat. 11 (1991)), provide that “Service in the Republic of Vietnam” includes service in the waters offshore and service in other locations if the conditions of service involved duty or visitation in the Republic of Vietnam.

8. The references to service “in the Republic of Vietnam” in sections 1116 and 1710 were included for a specific purpose relating to the use of herbicide agents in Vietnam. In contrast, the general definition of the Vietnam era in section 101(29) was amended, as discussed above, to acknowledge the period during which United States personnel accompanied Vietnamese troops on combat missions within Vietnam. Accordingly, we believe the references may reasonably be interpreted as having different meanings in the context of the particular statutes in which they appear. See Abbott Labs. v. Young, 920 F.2d 984, 987 (D.C. Cir. 1990), cert. denied, 502 U.S. 819 (1991) (an imprecise term may be interpreted differently in two separate sections of a statute which have different purposes) Common Cause v. Federal Election Comm’n, 842 F.2d 436, 441-42 (D.C. Cir. 1988) (in pari materia doctrine did not require that same term be similarly interpreted as used in two provisions of a statute, where the two provisions had different purposes). In any event, the regulatory definition in 38 C.F.R. § 3.307(a)(6)(iii), which permits certain personnel not actually stationed within the borders of the Republic of Vietnam to be considered to have served in that Republic, requires that an individual actually have been present within the boundaries of the Republic to be considered to have served there, through inclusion of the requirement for duty or visitation in the Republic. Thus, the definition of “[s]ervice in the Republic of Vietnam” in section 3.307(a)(6)(iii) is not inconsistent with our interpretation of the reference to service in the Republic of Vietnam in section 101(29)(A).

Service on a deep-water naval vessel in waters off the shore of the Republic of Vietnam does not constitute service in the Republic of Vietnam for purposes of 38 U.S.C. § 101(29)(A), as added by section 505 of the Veterans’ Benefits Improvements Act of 1996, which provides that the term “Vietnam era” means the period beginning on February 28, 1961, and ending on May 7, 1975, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period.

This precedent makes reference to one issued earlier [VAOPGCPREC 7-93], which effectively barred veterans who flew high altitude mission in Vietnamese airspace from presumptive eligibility as well. While we think this is a case of using apples for oranges to add strength to what they were doing here, it is obvious to us that the DVA was looking to continue carving back the eligibility lists for presumption of exposure to dioxins. The Blue Sky Fliers lost theirs in 1993, a bare two years after the Agent Orange authorization Act was signed by the first President Bush. So it didn’t take the DVA long before they took a Congressionally authorized benefit to a whole generation of America’s Warriors and began slicing away at it, in effect, making law!

It is our hope that the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, in considering Haas v. Nicholson, which is currently before them, sees these actions by a Cabinet level Department as an attempt to make law, where the Supreme Court has always held that only the Congress and the Courts could make law. An administrative entity such as the Department of Veterans Affairs cannot make law, as was specifically reiterated in Ribaudo v. Nicholson, in January of this year.

Obviously, since it became law, the DVA has been trying to find ways to NOT pay Vietnam Veterans benefits. This is an insidious and criminally negligent mindset. The court needs to end it, and set the matter right.

"With malice toward none with charity for all with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation's wounds to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan--to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace, among ourselves, and with all nations." -- President Abraham Lincoln

"Without a decisive naval force we can do nothing definitive, and with it, everything honorable and glorious." --President George Washington

Copyright © 2007: VNVets Blog All Rights Reserved.


Vammen DE-644 - History

HISTORY OF THE USS OAKLAND TEXT IN BLUE
Okinawa Gunto operation-- 17 Mar 1945 to 11 Jun 1945
Third Fleet operations against Japan-- 10 Jul 1945 to 15 Aug 1945

THANKS TO UNITED STATES NAVAL CHRONOLOGY, WORLD WAR II
I have edited the above files for the South Pacific area only.The edited text is shown in BLACK.

01/01 Mon. Army troops are landed by naval task unit on Fais Island, Caroline Islands, to capture and destroy Japanese radio station.

01/02 Tue. United States naval vessel damaged Oiler COWANESQUE (AO-79), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 08 d. 56'N., 122 d. 49'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 138, by Army aircraft, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 37'N., 120 d. 19'E.

01/03 Wed. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain),commence 2-day strike on Japanese shipping and aircraft in the Ryukyu Islands and Formosa. United States naval vessels damaged: Escort carrier SARGENT BAY (CVE-83) and destroyer escort ROBERT F. KELLER (DE-419), by collision, Philippine Islands area. Minelayer MONADNOCK (CM-9), by collision, Luzon area, P. I., 12 d. 22'N., 121 d. 01'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 10, by Army aircraft, Philippine Islands area, 07 d. 04'N., 123 d. 37'E. United States naval vessel sunk: Escort carrier OMMANEY BAY (CVE-79) , damaged by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 11 d. 25'N., 121 d. 19'E sunk by United States forces.

01/04 Thu. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer BALL (DD-587), by collision, Luzon area, P. I., 11 d. 25'N., 121 d. 19'E. Oiler PECOS (AO-65), by horizontal bomber, Luzon area, P. I., 12 d. 19'N., 121 d. 04'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 210, by aircraft, Formosa Strait.

01/05 Fri. Cruiser and destroyer task group (Rear Adm. A. E. Smith) bombards, and Army aircraft bomb enemy shipping and installations on Chichi Jima and Haha Jima, Bonin Islands. Cruiser and destroyer task force (Rear Adm. J. L. McCrea) bombards Japanese installations at Suribachi Wan, Paramushiro, in the Kurile Islands. United States naval vessels damaged: Escort carrier MANILA BAY (CVE-61), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 50'N., 119 d. 10'E. Escort carrier SAVO ISLAND (CVE-78), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 50'N., 119 d. 00'E. Heavy cruiser LOUISVILLE (CA-28), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 00'N., 119 d. 00'E. Destroyer HELM (DD-388), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 00'N., 119 d. 00'E. Destroyer DAVID W. TAYLOR (DD-551), by mine, Bonin Islands area, 27 d. 04'N., 142 d. 06'E. Destroyer escort EDWIN A. HOWARD (DE-346), by collision with destroyer escort LELAND E. THOMAS (DE-420), Philippine Islands area, 09 d. 48'N., 127 d. 15'E. Destroyer escort STAFFORD (DE-411), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 00 N., 120 d. 00'E. Seaplane tender (small) ORCA (AVP-49), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 36'N., 119 d. 20'E. Ocean tug APACHE (ATF-67), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 53'N., 119 d. 00'E.

01/06 Sat. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) commence 1-day attack on Japanese aircraft and airfield facilities in Luzon area, P. I. United States naval vessels sunk: High-speed minesweeper HOVEY (DMS-11) , by aircraft torpedo, Luzon area, P.I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. High-speed minesweeper LONG (DMS-12) , by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 12'N., 120 d. 11'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleships NEW MEXICO (BB-40) and CALIFORNIA (BB-44),by suicide planes, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Heavy cruiser LOUISVILLE (CA-28), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 37'N., 120 d. 17'E. Heavy cruiser MINNEAPOLIS (CA-36), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 10'N., 120 d. 10'E. Light cruiser COLUMBIA (CL-56), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Destroyer NEWCOMB (DD-586), by suicide plane and accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'.E Destroyer RICHARD P. LEARY (DD-664), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Destroyers ALLEN M. SUMNER (DD-691) and WALKE (DD-723), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 40'N., 120 d. 10'E. Destroyer O'BRIEN (DD-725), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 23'N., 120 d. 14'E. Destroyer LOWRY (DD-770), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 40'N., 120 d. 10'E. High-speed minesweeper SOUTHARD (DMS-10), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16'11 d. N., 126 d. 16'E. High-speed transport BROOKS (APD-10), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E.

01/07 Sun. Battleship, cruiser, and destroyer force (Vice Adm. J. B. Oldendorf) and aircraft from escort carrier group (Rear Adm. C. T. Durgin) open 2-day bombardment and bombing of beach area in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, P. I. United States naval vessel sunk: High-speed minesweeper PALMER (DMS-5) , by horizontal bomber, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Attack transport CALLAWAY (APA-35), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 17 d. 00'N., 120 d. 00'E. LST 912, by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E.

01/08 Mon. United States naval vessels damaged: Escort carrier KITKUN BAY (CVE-71), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 48'N., 119 d. 09'E. Escort carrier KADASHAN BAY (CVE-76), by suicide plane, Luzon area, P. I., 15 d. 10'N., 119 d. 08'E.

01/09 Tue. Army forces land in Lingayen Gulf area, P. I., under cover of naval gunfire and carrier-based aircraft. Gen. Douglas MacArthur is in overall command of the operation. Vice Adm. T. C. Kinkaid commands the naval forces, and Lt. Gen. W. Krueger is the ground force commander. In support of the landings, aircraft fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) bomb Japanese airfields and shipping in the Formosa, Ryukyus, and Pescadores Islands areas. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship MISSISSIPPI (BB-41), by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 08'N., 120 d. 18'E. Battleship COLORADO (BB-45), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 08'N., 120 d. 10'E. Light cruiser COLUMBIA (CL-56), by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 08'N., 120 d. 10'E. Destroyer escort HODGES (DE-231), by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 22'N., 120 d. 12'E. Transport WARHAWK (AP-168), by suicide boat, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Oiler GUADALUPE (A0-32), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 20 d. 06'N., 121 d. 34'E. LST 925 and LST 1028, by depth charges, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Formosa area: Submarine chaser NO. 61, by carrier-based aircraft, 22 d. 40'N, 120 d. 04'E. Submarine chaser NO. 90, by carrier-based aircraft, 22 d. 40'N., 120 d. 00'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 3, by carrier-based aircraft, 27 d. 10'N., 121 d. 45'E.

01/10 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer WICKER (DD-578), by horizontal bomber, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 04'N., 118 d. 55'E. Destroyer escort LERAY WILSON (DE-414), by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. High-speed transport CLEMSON (APD-31), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Attack transport DUPAGE (APA-41), by suicide plane, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 17'N., 120 d. 15'E. Attack transport LATIMER (APA-152), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. LST 507, by collision, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. LST 610, by suicide boat, Philippine Islands area, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 45, by submarine PUFFER (SS-268), off the Ryukyu Islands, 20 d. 01'N., 126 d. 34'E.

01/11 Thu. United States naval vessels damaged, Philippine Islands area: High-speed transport BELKNAP (APD-34), by suicide plane, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. LST 270, by coastal defense gun, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. LST 700, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 16 d. 43'N., 119 d. 58'E. LST 918, by coastal defense gun, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E.

01/11 The Golden Gate was sighted and the ship stood into San Francisco Bay.

01/12 Fri. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) operating in the South China Sea hit Japanese shipping, airfields, and other shore installations in southeast French Indochina. United States naval vessels damaged, Philippine Islands area: Destroyer escorts RICHARD W. SUESENS (DE-342) and GILLIGAN (DE-508), by suicide planes, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E. Attack transport ZEILIN (APA-3), by suicide plane, 15 d. 23'N., 119 d. 10'E. LST 700, by suicide plane, 14 d. 04'N., 119 d. 25'E. LST 710 and LST 778, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 15 d. 00'N., 119 d. 30'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk, by carrier-based aircraft, South China Sea: Training cruiser KASHII, 13 d. 50'N., 109 d. 20'E. Frigate CHIBURI, 10 d. 20'N., 107 d. 50'E. Submarine chaser NO. 31, 11 d. 10'N., 108 d. 55'E. Submarine chaser NO. 43, 11 d. 53'N., 109 d. 08'E. Minesweeper NO. 101, 11 d. 10'N., 108 d. 55'E. Transport NO. 140, 10 d. 20'N, 107 d. 50'E. Patrolboat NO. 103, 11 d. 10'N., 108 d. 55'E. Coast defense vessels NOs. 17 and 19, 10 d. 20'N., 107 d. 50'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 23, 14 d. 15'N., 109 d. 10'E. Coast defense vessels NOs. 35 and 43, 11 d. 10'N., 108 d. 55'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 51, 14 d. 15'N., 109 d. 10'E.

01/12 At Bethlemhem Steel Company, San Francisco, California, undergoing overhaul.

01/13 Sat. United States naval vessel damaged, Philippine Islands area: Escort carrier SALAMAUA (CVE-96), by suicide plane, 17 d. 09'N., 119 d. 21'E.

01/14 Sun. United States naval vessel lost: PT-73, by rounding, Philippine Islands area, 13 d. 50'N., 120 d. 10'E. beached and abandoned. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minelayer YURISHIMA, by submarine COBIA (SS-145), off Sumatra, 05 d. 51'N., 103 d. 16'E.

01/15 Mon. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) attack Japanese shipping and aircraft in the Formosa and China coast areas. United States naval vessel damaged: Escort carrier HOGGATT BAY (CVE-75), by accidental explosion, Philippine Islands area, 17 d. 01'N., 119 d. 20'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk, by carrier-based aircraft, Formosa area: Destroyer HATAKAZE, 22 d. 37'N., 120 d. 15'E. Old destroyer TSUGA, 23 d. 33'N., 119 d. 33'E. Transport NO. 14, 11 d. 37'N., 120 d. 15'E.

01/16 Tue. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) strike enemy shipping and installations at Hong Kong, Hainan Island, and along the China coast.

01/17 Wed. United States naval vessel damaged: Escort carrier NEHENTA BAY (CVE-74), by storm, Philippine Islands area, 17 d. 41'N., 117 d. 33'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Transport NO. 15, by submarine TAUTOG (SS-199), off Kyushu, Japan, 31 d. 09'N., 130 d. 29'E.

01/18 Thu. Two Japanese raiding parties land on Peleliu, Palau Islands, in an unsuccessful attempt to damage aircraft on the ground and destroy ammunition. United States naval vessels damaged, Philippines Islands area: LST 219, by grounding, 16 d. 10'N., 120 d. 22'E. LST 710, by collision, 16 d. 10'N., 120 d. 22'E. LST 752, by collision, 11 d. 11'N., 125 d. 05'E. Japanese submarine sunk: RO-47, by destroyer escort FLEMING (DE-32), central Pacific area, 12 d. 08'N., 154 d. 27'E.

01/20 Sat. Submarine Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies on south coast of Mindanao, P. I. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) attack enemy shipping and airfields in Formosa, and Pescadores Islands, and Sakashima Gunto and Okinawa in the Ryukyu Islands. Japanese aircraft make concerted counterattacks on the task force ships. United States naval vessels damaged, Formosa-Ryukyu Islands area: Carrier TICONDEROGA (CV-14), by suicide plane, 22 d. 40'N., 122 d. 57'E. Carrier HANCOCK (CV-19), by accidental explosion, 22 d. 40'N., 122 d. 30'E. Light carrier LANGLEY (CVL-27), by suicide plane, 22 d. 40'N., 122 d. 51'E. Destroyer MADDOX (DD-731), by suicide plane, 23 d. 06'N., 122 d. 43'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Transport NO. 101, by carrier-based aircraft, Formosa area, 22 d. 37'N., 120 d. 15'E. Transport NO. 102, by carrier-based aircraft, Philippine Islands area, 11 d. 03'N., 123 d. 05'E.

01/22 Mon. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) strike Japanese shipping, airfields, and other installations in the Ryukyu Islands.

01/23 Tue. Submarine BARB (SS-220) enters Namkwan harbor, China, and makes torpedo attack on Japanese auxiliary shipping. Submarine NAUTILUS (SS-168) delivers supplies to east coast of Mindanao, P. I. Japanese submarine sunk: I-48, by destroyer escorts CORBESIER (DE-438), CONKLIN (DE-439), and RABY (DE-698), off Yap Island, Caroline Islands, 09 d. 45'N., 138 d. 20'E.

01/24 Wed. Battleship, cruiser, and destroyer task group (Rear Adm. O. C. Badger) bombards enemy positions on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands. Naval land-based aircraft from the Philippine Islands bomb Japanese shipping at Keelung, Formosa. United States naval vessel sunk: Salvage vessel EXTRACTOR (ARS-15) , accidentally by United States submarine, Philippine Sea, 15 d. 44'N., 133 d. 29'E. United States naval vessel damaged: Landing ship dock SHADWELL (LSD-15), by aircraft torpedo, Philippine Islands area, 09 d. 01'N., 123 d. 45'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer SHIGURE, by submarine BLACKFIN (SS-322), Gulf of Siam, 06 d. 00'N., 103 d. 48'E.

01/27 Sat. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper NO. 102, by submarine BERGALL (SS-320), Java Sea, 08 d. 37'S., 115 d. 39'E.

01/28 Sun. Carrier ANTIETAM (CV-36), is commissioned at Philadelphia, Pa. United States naval vessel sunk: PT-338 , by grounding, off Luzon, P. I., 12 d. 06'N., 121 d. 23'E. sunk by United States forces. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Frigate KUME, by submarine SPADEFISH (SS-411), Yellow Sea, 33 d. 56'N., 123 d. 06'E,

01/29 Mon. Army forces are landed near San Antonio, northwest of Subic Bay, Luzon, P. I., by naval attack group (Rear Adm. A. D. Struble). United States naval vessel sunk: Cargo ship SERPENS (AK-97) , by explosion, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Philippine Islands area: Transport CAVALIER (APA-37), by submarine torpedo, 14 d. 48'N., 119 d. 18'E. Repair ship AMYCUS (ARL-2), by horizontal bomber, 16 d. 20'N., 120 d. 10'E.

01/30 Tue. Army troops are landed on Grande Island, Subic Bay, Luzon, P. I.

01/31 Wed. Army troops are landed at Masugbu, south of the entrance to Manila Bay, Luzon, P. I., by naval attack group (Rear Adm. W. M. Fechteler) with support by carrier-based aircraft (Rear Adm. W. D. Sample). United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser PC-1119 , by suicide boat, Philippine Islands area, 14 d. 05'N., 12O d. 30'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer UME, by Army aircraft, off Formosa, 22 d. 30'N., 120 d. 00'E.

02/01 Thu. United States naval vessels sunk: PT-77 , accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Philippine Islands area, 13 d. 55'N., 120 d. 36'E. beached and abandoned. PT-79 , accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Philippine Islands area, 13 d. 55'N., 120 d. 36'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Transport NO. 115, by Army aircraft, Philippine Islands area, 20 d. 00'N., 121 d. 00'E. Submarine RO-115, by destroyers JENKINS (DD-447), O'BANNON (DD-450), and BELL (DD-587), and destroyer escort ULVERT M. MOORE (DE-442), Philippine Islands area, 13 d. 20'N., 119 d. 20'E.

02/02 Sat. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 144, by submarine BESUGO (SS-321), off Malay Peninsula, 04 d. 32'N., 104 d. 30'E.

02/07 Wed. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine RO-55, by destroyer escort THOMASON (DE-203), Philippine Islands area, 15 d. 27'N., 119 d. 25'E. Coast defense vessel No. 53, by submarine BERGALL (SS-320), South China Sea, 12 d. 04'N., 109 d. 22'E.

02/09 Fri. Submarine BATFISH (SS-310) sinks Japanese submarine this is the first of three Japanese submarines sunk in 4 days by BATFISH. (See 11 and 12 February 1945.) Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine I-41, by submarine BATFISH (SS-310), Philippine Islands area, 18 d. 50'N., 121 d. 40'E.

02/11 Sun. United States naval vessel sunk: LST 577 , damaged by submarine torpedo, east of Philippine Islands, 08 d. 01'N., 130 d. 37'E., sunk by United States forces. United States naval vessel damaged: Ocean tug TAKELMA (ATF-113), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 10 d. 50'N., 125 d. 25'E. Japanese submarine sunk: RO-112, by submarine BATFISH (SS-310), Philippine Islands area, 18 d. 53'N., 121 d. 50'E.

02/12 Mon. Japanese submarine sunk: RO-113, by submarine BATFISH (SS-310), Philippine Islands area, 19 d. 10'N., 121 d. 23'E.

02/13 Tue. Motor torpedo boats enter Manila Bay, Luzon, P. I., for night reconnaissance these are the first United States naval units to enter Manila Bay since May 1942.

02/14 Wed. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor minesweeper YMS-48 , by coastal defense gun, Philippine Islands area, 14 d. 24'N., 120 d. 33'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Philippine Islands area: Destroyer FLETCHER (DD-445), by coastal defense gun, 14 d. 25'N., 120 d. 30'E. Destroyers RADFORD (DD-446) and LAVALLETTE (DD-448), by mines, 14 d. 25'N., 120 d. 30'E. Destroyer HOPEWELL (DD-681), by coastal defense gun, 14 d. 24'N., 120 d. 33'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine chasers NOs. 4 and 114, by submarine HAWKBILL (SS-366), Java Sea, 08 d. 20'S., 115 d. 43'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 9, by submarine GATO (SS-212), Yellow Sea, 34 d. 48'N., 125 d. 58'E.

02/15 Thu. Army forces are landed in the Mariveles Harbor area of Bataan Peninsula, Luzon, P. I., by naval task group (Rear Adm. A. D. Struble). United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine SWORDFISH (SS-193) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessel damaged: Motor minesweeper YMS-46, by coastal defense gun, 14 d. 23'N., 120 d. 36' E.

02/16 Fri. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) bomb airfields, aircraft factories, and shipping in the Tokyo area, Japan attack is repeated on 17 February. Fire support vessels and carrier-based aircraft commence 3-day prelanding bombardment and bombing of Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands. Cruiser and destroyer task force (Rear Adm. J. L. McCrea) bombards enemy shore installations at Kurabu Zaki, Paramushiro, Kurile Islands. Army forces, preceded by naval bombardment and attack by Army aircraft, land on Corregidor, Luzon, P. I. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine BARBEL (SS-316) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyers INGRAHAM (DD-694) and BARTON (DD-722), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 31 d. 45'N., 141 d. 54'E. Submarine chaser PC-1119, by coastal defense gun, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 23'N., 120 d. 35'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minelayer NARIU, by submarine SENNET (SS-408), off Shikoku, Japan, 32 d. 10'N., 135 d. 54'E.

02/17 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship TENNESSEE (BB-43), by coastal defense gun, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 44'N., 141 d. 19'E. Heavy cruiser PENSACOLA (CA-24), by coastal defense gun, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Destroyer LEUTZE (DD-481), by coastal defense gun, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Destroyer DORTCH (DD-670), by strafing, Iwo Jima area, 30 d. 01'N., 141 d. 45'E. Destroyer WALDRON (DD-699), by intentional ramming of Japanese picket boat, Iwo Jima area, 29 d. 27'N., 141 d. 34'E. Tug HIDATSA (ATF-102), by mine, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 25'N., 120 d. 30'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Transport NO. 114, by Army aircraft, off Formosa, 23 d. 04'N., 120 d. 30'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 56, by submarine BOWFIN (SS-287), off Honshu, Japan, 33 d. 53'N., 139 d. 43'E.

02/18 Sun. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Light minelayer GAMBLE (DM-15), by horizontal bomber, 24 d. 55'N., 141 d. 08'E. High-speed transport BLESSMAN (APD-48), by horizontal bomber, 25 d. 05'N., 141 d. 10'E.

02/19 Mon. Marines land on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, supported by intensive naval gunfire and air attack. The operation is under the overall command of Adm. R. A. Spruance, Commander Fifth Fleet. Vice Adm. R. K. Turner is the Joint Expeditionary Force Commander and Lt. Gen. H. M. Smith, USMC, commands the Expeditionary Troops. Naval gunfire and air bombing continue to support the troops ashore during this difficult campaign. Army troops covered by Marine aircraft are landed at Allen on the northwest coast of Samar and on Capul Island, P. I., to insure control of San Bernardino Strait. (See 20 February 1945.) United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Heavy cruiser CHESTER (CA-27), by collision with amphibious force flagship ESTES (AGC-12), 24 d. 13'N., 141 d. 25'E. Destroyer BRADFORD (DD-545), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 20'E. Destroyer JOHN W. Weeks (DD-701), by coastal defense gun, 25 d. 32'N., 141 d. 01'E. Destroyer escort FINNEGAN (DE-307), by collision, 22 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

02/20 Tue. Army troops under cover of Marine aircraft are landed on Biri Island, P. I., to insure control of San Bernardino Strait. (See 19 February 1945.) United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Light cruiser BILOXI (CL-80), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 25 d. 47'N., 141 d. 15'E. Hospital ship SAMARITAN (AH-10), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Attack transports NAPA (APA-157) and LOGAN (APA-196), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Attack cargo ship STARR (AKA-67), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 779, by coastal mortar, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer NOKAZE, by submarine PARGO (SS-264), South China Sea, 12 d. 48'N., 109 d. 38'E.

02/21 Wed. Naval land-based and Army aircraft bomb and strafe enemy installations at Truk, Caroline Islands. United States naval vessel sunk: Escort carrier BISMARCK SEA (CVE-95) , by suicide plane, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 36'N., 141 d. 48'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier SARATOGA (CV-3), by suicide planes, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 56'N., 142 d. 01'E. Escort carrier LUNGA POINT (CVE-94), by suicide plane, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 40'N., 141 d. 44'E. Destroyer WILLIAMSON (DD-244), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 39'N., 142 d. 01'E. Destroyer RENSHAW (DD-499), by submarine torpedo, Luzon area, P. I., 24 d. 36'N., 141 d. 48'E. Attack cargo ship YANCEY (AKA-93), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Net cargo ship KEOKUK (AKN-4), by suicide plane, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 36'N., 141 d. 48'E. LST 390, by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 477, by suicide plane, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 40'N., 141 d. 44'E. LST 809, by suicide plane, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 08'N., 142 d. 06'E.

02/22 Thu. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer escort MELVIN R. NAWMAN (DE-416), by collision with LST 807, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

02/23 Fri. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Submarine chaser PC 877, by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'F LST 684, by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 716, by grounding, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 792, by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Frigate YAKU, by submarine HAMMERHEAD (SS-364), off Indochina, 12 d. 39'N., 109 d. 29'E. Submarine chaser No. 35, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 10 d. 15'N., 107 d. 31'E.

02/24 Sun. Japanese resistance in Manila, Luzon, P. I., ceases. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Heavy cruiser SAN FRANCISCO (CA-38), by storm, 30 d. 00'N., 145 d. 00'E. Destroyer COLAHAN (DD-658), by storm, 29 d. 45'N., 146 d. 20'E. Destroyer HEYWOOD L. EDWARDS (DD-663), by collision, 24 d. 47'N., 141 d. 25'E. Destroyer BRYANT (DD-665), by collision, 24 d. 47'N., 141 d. 25'E. Destroyer MOALE (DD-693), by storm, 25 d. 00'N., 141 d. 00'E. Submarine chaser PC-578, by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 792, by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese submarine sunk: RO-49, by submarine LEGARTO (SS-371), off Kyushu, 32 d. 40'N., 132 d. 33'E.

02/25 Sun. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) bomb aircraft factories and airfields near Tokyo, Japan. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer HARRISON (DD-573), by storm, south of Honshu, Japan, 33 d. 00'N., 141 d. 00'E. Attack transport FAYETTE (APA-43), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 45'N., 141 d. 20'E. Attack cargo ship MULIPHEN (AKA-61), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Seaplane tender HAMLIN (AV-15), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-175, by mine, Caroline Island area, 07 d. 20'N., 134 d. 35'E. LST 918, by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

02/26 Mon. United States naval vessels damaged: Light cruiser PASADENA (CL-65), by naval gunfire, south of Honshu, Japan, 31 d. 20'N., 141 d. 15'E. Destroyer PORTERFIELD (DD-682), by naval gunfire, south of Honshu, Japan, 33 d. 10'N., 143 d. 30'E. Minesweeper SAUNTER (AM-195), by mine, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 17'N., 120 d. 38'E. LST 121, by collision and grounding, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 760, and LST 884, by coastal defense gun, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine I-368, by aircraft (VC-82) from escort carrier Anzio (CVE-57), Volcano Islands area, 24 d. 43'N., 140 d. 37'E. Submarine I-370, by destroyer escort FINNEGAN (DE-307), near Volcano Islands, 22 d. 45'N., 141 d. 27'E. Submarine RO-43, by aircraft (VC-82) from escort carrier Anzio (CVE-57), near Volcano Islands, 24 d. 07'N., 140 d. 19'E. Frigate SHONAN, by submarine HOE (SS-258), South China Sea, 17 d. 08'N., 110 d. 01'E. Picket boat, by naval gunfire, south of Honshu, Japan.

02/27 Tue. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Light carrier SAN JACINTO (CVL-30), by collision, 23 d. 00'N., 139 d. 00'E. Destroyer COLHOUN (DD-801), by collision, 24 d. 49'N., 141 d. 20'E. Oiler MERRIMACK (AO-37), by collision, 23 d. 00'N., 139 d. 00'E. Attack transport PRESIDENT ADAMS (APA-19), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Attack transport KNOX (APA-46), by collision, 14 d. 49'N., 141 d. 21'E. Attack cargo ship TOLLAND (AKA-64), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 779, by collision and grounding, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 809, by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

02/28 Wed. Army troops are landed at Puerto Princesa, Palawan Island, P. I., by naval attack group (Rear Adm. W. M. Fechteler) landing is preceded by naval bombardment, United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Destroyer BENNETT (DD-473), by aircraft bomb, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Destroyer TERRY (DD-513), by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 48'N., 141 d. 33'E. Submarine chaser PCS-1461, by collision, 24 d. 46' N.,141 d. 19'E. Attack cargo ship WHITLEY (AKA-91), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 641 and LST 787, by collision, 24 d. 46'N, 141 d. 19'E.

03/01 Thu. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) attack enemy ground installations, aircraft, and shipping in the Okinawa area, Ryukyu Islands. Army troops supported by naval gunfire and Army aircraft land on Lubang Island, P. I. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Destroyers TERRY (DD-513) and COLHOUN (DD-801), by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 47'N., 141 d. 21'E. Attack transport BERRIEN (APA-62), by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Torpedo boat MANAZURU, by carrier-based aircraft, Ryukyu Islands area, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 35'E. Minelayer TSUBAME, by carrier-based aircraft, Formosa area, 24 d. 23'N,, 124 d. 12'E.

03/01 to 03 Shakedown conducted off the Farallones.

03/02 Fri. Cruiser and destroyer task group (Rear Adm. F. E. M. Whiting) bombards Japanese positions on Okino Daito Jima, Ryukyu Islands. Destroyers bombard enemy on Parece Vela Reef in the Philippine Sea. United States naval vessels damaged, Iwo Jima area: Attack cargo ship STOKES (AKA-68), LST 224, LST 247, LST 634, by collision, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 642, by grounding, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

03/03 Sat. Army troops land on Masbate, Burias and Ticao Islands, P. I. landings are supported by naval gunfire and Marine aircraft. Submarine TUNA (SS-203) lands supplies on northeast coast of Borneo. United States naval vessel damaged, Iwo Jima area: Attack transport BOLIVAR (APA-34), by coastal defense gun, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Oiler HARIO, by mine, off French Indochina, 18 d. 10'N., 109 d. 40'E.

03/04 Oakland departed from San Francisco Bay and set course for Pearl Harbor.

03/05 Mon. United States naval vessel damaged: LST 641, by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 110, by Army aircraft, Netherlands East Indies area, 08 d. 36'S., 119 d. 19'E. Minesweeper No. 15, by submarine TILEFISH (SS-307), north of Ryukyu Islands.

03/08 Thu. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Transport No. 143, by Army aircraft, Formosa area, 23 d. 35'N., 121 d. 35'E.

03/09 Entered Pearl Harbor.

03/10 Sat. Naval attack group (Rear Adm. F. B. Royal) lands Army troops near Zamboanga, Mindanao, P. I. landing is supported by naval gunfire and Army aircraft.

03/11 Sun.United States naval vessel damaged: Carrier RANDOLPH (CV-15), by suicide plane, Ulithi, Caroline Islands area, 10 d. 01'N., 139 d. 40'E.

03/11 to 14 Intensive training exercises conducted in the Hawaiian training area.

03/13 Tue. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 66, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 23 d. 30'N., 117 d. 10'E.

03/14 Wed. Submarine ROCK (SS-274) lands supplies on Lombok Island, Netherlands East Indies.

03/14 Returned to Pearl Harbor.

03/15 Thu. Cruiser and destroyer task force (Rear Adm. J. L. McCrea) bombards enemy shore installations on Matsuwa, Kurile Islands.

03/16 Fri. Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, is declared secured. Army forces supported by destroyer gunfire land on Basilan Island, Sulu Archipelago, P. I. United States naval vessel damaged: LST 928, by grounding, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 69, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 19 d. 02'N., 110 d. 56'E.

03/17 Sat. United States naval vessel damaged: Submarine SPOT (SS-413), by naval gunfire, off Formosa, 23 d. 00'N., 122 d. 00'E.

03/18 Sun. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) bomb airfields on Kyushu, Japan. Army troops are landed on southeast coast of Panay, P. I., by naval task group (Rear Adm. A. D. Struble) under cover of cruiser and destroyer gunfire. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by horizontal bomber, off Kyushu, Japan, 30 d. 50'N., 133 d. 42'E. Carrier YORKTOWN (CV-10), by horizontal bomber, off Kyushu, Japan, 30 d. 40'N., 133 d. 49'E. Carrier INTREPID (CV-11), by suicide plane and accidentally by United States naval gunfire, off Kyushu, Japan, 30 d. 47'N., 133 d. 50'E. LST 635, by grounding, Philippine Islands area, 11 d. 05'N., 125 d. 05'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Transport No. 18, by submarine SPRINGER (SS-414), south of the Ryukyu Islands, 26 d. 33'N., 127 d. 11'E.

03/19 Mon. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) bomb airfields on Kyushu, and shipping at Kure and Kobe, Honshu, Japan. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier ESSEX (CV-9), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, off Shikoku, Japan, 32 d. 10'N., 134 d. 20'E. Carrier FRANKLIN (CV-13), by horizontal bomber, off Kyushu, Japan, 32 d. 01'N., 133 d. 57'E. Carrier WASP (CV-18), by dive bomber, off Shikoku, Japan, 32 d. 16'N., 134 d. 05'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: River gunboat SUMA, by Army mine, off Shanghai, China, 32 d. 00'N., 120 d. 00'E.

03/19 Oakland sortied from Pearl Harbor.

03/20 Tue. Submarine PERCH (SS-313) lands personnel on east coast of Borneo. United States naval vessels damaged: Carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, off Japan, 30 d. 01'N., 134 d. 30'E. Destroyer HALSEY POWELL (DD-686), by suicide plane, off Japan, 30 d. 27'N., 134 d. 28'E. Submarine DEVILFISH (SS-292), by suicide plane, off Volcano Islands, 25 d. 36'N., 137 d. 30'E. Cargo ship HERCULES (AK-41), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

03/21 Wed. Japanese aircraft make first known operational use of piloted bombs in unsuccessful attack against Admiral Mitscher's fast carrier task force. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 33 and cable layer TATEISHI, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 11 d. 50'N., 109 d. 18'E.

03/22 Thu. United States naval vessel damaged: LST 727, by grounding, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E.

03/23 Fri. Aircraft of fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) commence daily strikes against the enemy on Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer HAGGARD (DD-555), by intentional ramming of enemy submarine I-371, Philippine Sea, 22 d. 57' N., 132 d. 19'E. Submarine SEAHORSE (SS-304), by horizontal bomber, Ryukyu Islands area, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Ocean tug ZUNI (ATF-95), by grounding, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine I-371, by destroyer HAGGARD (DD-555), Philippine Sea, 22 d. 57'N., 132 d. 19'E.

03/24 Sat. Battleships (Vice Adm. W. A. Lee) bombard Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 68 and torpedo boat TOMOZURU, by carrier-based aircraft, South China Sea, 28 d. 25'N., 124 d. 32'E.

03/25 Sun. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers (Rear Adm. M. L. Deyo) bombard Kerama Retto and southeast coast of Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands bombardment of Okinawa area continues daily. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer KIMBERLEY (DD-521), by suicide plane, 26 d. 02'N., 126 d. 54'E. Destroyer escort SEDERSTROM (DE-31), by collision, 25 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Light minelayer ROBERT H. SMITH (DM-23), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. High-speed transport GILMER (APD-11), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 20'E. High-speed transport KNUDSEN (APD-101), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 04'E.

03/26 Mon. Army forces are landed on Kerama Retto, Ryukyu Islands, by naval attack group (Rear Adm. I. N. Kiland) under cover of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft attack. Army forces are landed at Talisay Point, Cebu, P. I., by naval attack group (Capt. A. T. Sprague) under cover of cruiser and destroyer gunfire and air attack. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer HALLIGAN (DD-584) , by mine, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 30'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship NEVADA (BB-36), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 18'E. Light cruiser BILOXI (CL-80), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 18'E . , Destroyer MURRAY (DD-576), by dive bomber, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 129 d. 46'E. Destroyer PORTERFIELD (DD-682), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 18'E . , Destroyer O'BRIEN (DD-725), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 16'N., 127 d. 26'E. Destroyer CALLAGHAN (DD-792), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 43'E. Destroyer escort FOREMAN (DE-633), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 18'E. High-speed minesweeper DORSEY (DMS-1), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 18'E. Minelayer SKIRMISH (AM-303), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 05'E. Submarine chaser PC-1133, by grounding, Philippine Islands area, 10 d. 13'N., 123 d. 51'E.

03/27 Tue. Army troops, supported by destroyers and motor torpedo boats and air attack, land on Caballo Island near Corregidor, Luzon, P. I. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Carrier ESSEX (CV-9), by aircraft operational casualty, 25 d. 10'N., 132 d. 05'E. [The landing was "less than optimal"? LWJ] High-speed minesweeper SOUTHARD (DMS-10), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Light minelayer ADAMS (DM-27), by suicide plane, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 40 E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Cable layer ODATE, by submarine TRIGGER (SS-237), East China Sea, 30 d. 40'N., 127 d. 50'E.

03/28 Wed. United States naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper SKYLARK (AM-63) , by mine, Okinawa area, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 41'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Attack cargo ship WYANDOT (AKA-92), by horizontal bomber, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Repair ship AGENOR (ARL-3), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 33, by carrier-based aircraft, off Kyushu, Japan, 31 d. 45'N., 131 d. 45'E. Frigate MIKURA, by submarine THREADFIN (SS-410), off Kyushu, Japan, 31 d. 49'N., 131 d. 44'E. Minesweeper NO. 11, by Army aircraft, Netherlands East Indies area, 05 d. 06'S., 119 d. 18'E. Patrol boat No. 108, by Army aircraft, Netherlands East Indies area, 04 d. 15'S., 119 d. 05'E.

03/29 Thu. Aircraft from two carrier task groups (Rear Adm. J. J. Clark and Rear Adm. F. C. Sherman) attack airfields and shipping in the Kagoshima Bay area, Kyushu, Japan. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 192, by Army aircraft, off Formosa, 22 d. 40'N., 120 d. 15'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 18, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 14 d. 44'N., 109 d. 16'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 84, by submarine HAMMERHEAD (SS-364), South China Sea, 14 d. 30'N., 109 d. 16'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 130, by Army aircraft, South China Sea, 14 d. 44'N., 109 d. 16'E.

03/30 Fri. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser INDIANAPOLIS (CA-35), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 30'E. High-speed transport ROPER (APD-20), by collision, Philippine Sea, 20 d. 57'N., 132 d. 05'E.

03/30 Arrived in Ulithi Atoll Lagoon.

03/31 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged: Heavy cruiser PENSACOLA (CA-24), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 19'E. Light minelayer ADAMS (DM-27), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 08'E. Seaplane tender (small) COOS BAY (AVP-25), by collision, Central Pacific area, 12 d. 07'N., 156 d. 27'E. Attack transport HINSDALE (APA-120), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 54'N., 127 d. 49'E. LST 724 and LST 884, by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 59'N., 127 d. 50'E. Japanese submarine sunk: I-8, by destroyers MORRISON (DD-560) and STOCKTON (DD-646), Okinawa area, 25 d. 29'N., 128 d. 35'E.

03/31 Departed from Ulithi and headed for Okinawa to join the fleet.

04/01 Sun. Marines and Army forces land on Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, under cover of heavy naval gunfire and air attack. The operation is under the overall command of Adm. R. A. Spruance, Commander Fifth Fleet. Vice Adm. R. K. Turner commands the Joint Expeditionary Force, and the troops are commanded by Lt. Gen. A. B. Buckner, USA. Army forces are landed near Legaspi, southern Luzon, P, I., under cover of naval gunfire and Army aircraft. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa landings: Battleship WEST VIRGINIA (BB-48), by suicide plane, 26 d. 20'N,, 127 d. 40'E. Destroyer PRICHETT (DD-561), by dive bomber, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 25'E. Destroyer escort VAMMEN (DE-644), by mine, 26 d. 18'N., 127 d. 29'E. Minesweeper SKIRMISH (AM-303), by dive bomber, 26 d. 33'N., 127 d. 33'E. Attack cargo ship ACHERNAR (AKA-53), by suicide plane, 26 d. 07'N., 127 d. 45'E. Attack cargo ship TYRRELL (AKA-80), by suicide plane, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E. Attack transport ELMORE (APA-42), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 41'E. Attack transport ALPINE (APA-92), by suicide plane, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 41'E.

04/02 Mon. Army forces supported by destroyers land on Sanga Sanga and Bangao Islands, Sulu Archipelago, P. I. Submarine HARDHEAD (SS-365) lays mines off Cape Kamao, Cochin China. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer SHAW (DD-373), by grounding, Leyte area, P. I., 09 d. 36'N., 123 d. 53'E. Destroyer FRANKS (DD-554), by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 49'N., 130 d. 01'E. Destroyer PRICHETT (DD-561), by horizontal bomber, Okinawa area, 27 d. 17'N., 127 d. 51'E. Destroyer BORIE (DD-704), by collision, Okinawa area, 23 d. 36'N., 131 d. 40'E. Destroyer escort FOREMAN (DE-633), by dive bomber, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 11'E. Attack transport CHILTON (APA-38), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 59'N., 127 d. 17'E. Attack transport HENRICO (APA-45), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 59'N., 127 d. 17'E. Attack transport GOODHUE (APA-107), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 56'N., 127 d. 17'E. Attack transport TELFAIR (APA-210), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 56'N., 127 d. 17'E. Attack cargo ship LACERTA (AKA-29), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. LST 599, by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 16'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 186, by carrier-based aircraft, Yellow Sea. Transport NO. 17, by carrier-based aircraft, Yellow Sea.

04/02 Oakland joined Task Group 58.4 operating off Sakashima Gunto in the southern Nansei Shoto chain of islands.

04/03 Tue. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor minesweeper YMS-71 , by mine, off Borneo, 04 d. 59'N,, 119 d. 47'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier WAKE ISLAND (CVE-65), by suicide plane, 26 d. 05'N., 128 d. 57'E. Destroyer SPROSTON (DD-577), by dive bomber, 26 d. 30'N.,127 d. 57'E. High-speed minesweeper HAMBLETON (DMS-20), by suicide plane, 27 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. LST 554, by storm, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E.

04/04 Wed. United States naval vessel sunk: High-speed transport DICKERSON (APD-21) , damaged by suicide plane, Okinawa area sunk by United States forces. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer NORMAN SCOTT (DD-690), by collision, 23 d. 46'N., 129 d. 25'E. LST 70, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 166, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 343, by grounding, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. LST 399, by collision, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 570, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 44'E. LST 624, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 675, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 689, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 736, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 756, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N,, 127 d. 45'E. LST 781 , by grounding, 26 d. 23'N., 127 d. 44'E.

04/05 Thu. United States Naval Advanced Air Base, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, is established. Koiso cabinet in Japan resigns Admiral Suzuki becomes Prime Minister. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship NEVADA (BB-36), by coastal defense gun, Okinawa area, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 40'E. Light minelayer HARRY F. BAUER (DM-26), by aircraft torpedo, Okinawa area, 26 d. 30'N., 127 d. 30'E. Seaplane tender (destroyer) THORNTON (AVD-11), by collision, Okinawa area, 24 d. 24'N., 128 d. 58'E. Oiler ASHTABULA (AO-51), by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 09'N., 128 d. 47'E. Oiler ESCALANTE (AO-70), by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 09'N., 128 d. 47'E. Repair ship AGENOR (ARL-3), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 273, by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 42'E. LST 646, by collision, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 19'E. LST 698, by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 24'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 810, by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 42'E. LST 940, by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. LST 1000, by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 44'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine R0-41, by destroyer HUDSON (DD-475), Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 126 d. 30'E.

04/06 Fri. First heavy attack is made by Japanese suicide planes on United States ships at Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands similar attacks persist throughout the Okinawa campaign. United States naval vessels sunk, Okinawa area: Destroyer BUSH (DD-529) , by suicide plane, 27 d. 16'N., 127 d. 48'E. Destroyer COLHOUN (DD-801) , damaged by suicide plane, 27 d. 16'N., 127 d. 48'E. sunk by United States forces. High-speed minesweeper EMMONS (DMS-22) , damaged by suicide plane, 26 d. 48'N., 128 d. 04'E. sunk by United States forces. LST 447 , by suicide plane, 26 d. 09'N., 127 d. 18'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship NORTH CAROLINA (BB-55), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 41'N., 129 d. 32'E. Light carrier SAN JACINTO (CVL-30), by suicide plane, 26 d. 46'N., 129 d. 43'E. Light cruiser PASADENA (CL-65), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 27 d. 00'N., 129 d. 00'E. Destroyer MORRIS (DD-417), by suicide plane, 25 d. 55'N., 127 d. 52'E. Destroyer BENNETT (DD-473), by suicide plane, 27 d. 16'N., 127 d. 48'E. Destroyer HUTCHINS (DD-476), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer LEUTZE (DD-481), by suicide plane, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 28'E. Destroyer MULLANY (DD-528), by suicide plane, 26 d. 24'N., 128 d. 10'E. Destroyer HARRISON (DD-573), by suicide plane, 27 d. 05'N., 129 d. 22'E. Destroyer NEWCOMB (DD-586), by suicide plane, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 28'E. Destroyer HOWORTH (DD-592), by suicide plane, 26 d. 32'N., 127 d. 40'E. Destroyer HAYNESWORTH (DD-700), by suicide plane, 26 d. 55'N., 129 d. 29'E. Destroyer HYMAN (DD-731), by suicide plane, 26 d. 45'N., 127 d. 42'E. Destroyer TAUSSIG (DD-746), by horizontal bomber, 27 d. 07'N., 128 d. 39'E. Destroyer escort WITTER (DE-636), by suicide plane, 26 d. 04'N., 127 d. 52'E. Destroyer escort FIEBERLING (DE-640), by suicide plane, 26 d. 48'N., 128 d. 04'E. High-speed minesweeper RODMAN (DMS-21), by suicide plane, 26 d. 48'N., 128 d. 04'E. High-speed minesweeper HARDING (DMS-28), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper FACILITY (AM-133), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper RANSOM (AM-283), by suicide plane, 26 d. 48'N., 128 04'E. Minesweeper DEFENSE (AM-317), by suicide plane, 26 d. 38'N., 127 31'E. Minesweeper DEVASTOR (AM-318), by suicide plane, 26 d. 26'N., 127'40'E. Motor minesweeper YMS 311, by suicide plane, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 48'E, Motor minesweeper YMS 321, by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N,, 128 d. 00'E. Submarine chaser PCS-1390, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Attack transport BARNETT (APA-5), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. High-speed transport DANIEL T. GRIFFIN (APD-38), by collision, 25 d. 57 N., 127 d. 57'E. Attack cargo ship LEO (AKA-60), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. LST 241, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 1000, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 44'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Destroyer AMATSUKAZE, by Army aircraft, off China, 23 d. 55'N., 117 d. 40'E. Minesweeper NO. 22, by submarine BESUGO (SS-321), Netherlands East Indies area, 08 d. 13'S., 119 d. 14'E. Coast defense vessels NOs. 2 and 134, by Army aircraft, off China, 23 d. 55'N., 117 d. 40'E.

04/07 Sat. Aircraft of fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A.Mitscher) attack Japanese naval force moving through East China Sea toward Okinawa the enemy battleship YAMATO, 1 cruiser, and 4 destroyers are sunk. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor gunboat PGM-l8 , by mine, Okinawa area, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 55'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Aircraft carrier HANCOCK (CV-19), by suicide plane, 27 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Battleship MARYLAND (BB-46), by suicide plane, 26 d. 40'N., 127 d. 29'E. Destroyer LONGSHAW (DD-559), by suicide plane, 26 d. 29'N., 127 d. 41'E. Destroyer escort WESSON (DE-184), by suicide plane, 26 d. 48'N., 127 d. 55'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-81, by suicide plane, 26 d. 35'N., 127 d. 53'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-103, by mine, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 54'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-427, by coastal defense gun, 26 d. 14'N., 127 52'E. Attack transport AUDRAIN (APA-59), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 43'E. LST 698, by grounding, 26 d. 24'N., 127 d. 45'E. LST 890, by collision, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Battleship YAMATO, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 30 40'N., 128 03'E. Light cruiser ISUZU, by submarines GABILAN (SS-252) and CHARR (SS-328), off Celebes, Netherlands East Indies, 07 d. 38'S., 118 d. 09'E. Light cruiser YAHAGI, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 30 d. 40'N., 128 d. 03'E. Destroyer ASASHIMO, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 31 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer HAMAKAZE, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 30 d. 40'N., 128 d. 03'E. Destroyer ISOKAZE, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 30 d. 40'N., 128 d. 03'E. Destroyer KARUMI, by carrier-based aircraft, East China Sea, 30 d. 57'N., 127 d. 57'E.

04/07 The OAKLANDwas transferred to Task Group 58.2 operating in the vicinity. Daily strikes were conducted against Okinawa.

04/08 Sun. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer CHARLES J. BADGER (DD-657), by suicide boat, 26 d. 18'N., 127 d. 39'E. Destroyer GREGORY (DD-802), by suicide plane, 27 d. 07'N., 128 d. 39'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-92, by mine, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 53'E. Attack cargo ship STARR (AKA-67), by suicide boat, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 44'E. LST 939, by collision, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 44'E. LST 940, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 101, by naval gunfire, Netherlands East Indies area, 04 d. 43'S., 122 d. 17'E.

04/09 Mon. Army troops supported by destroyer gunfire and air strikes land on Jolo in the Sulu Archipelago, P. I. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier CHENANGO (CVE-28), by crash of friendly aircraft. Destroyer STERETT (DD-407), by suicide plane, 26 d. 47'N., 128 d. 42'E. Destroyer PORTERFIELD (DD-682), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 34'N., 128 d. 28'E. High-speed transport HOPPING (APD-51), by coastal defense gun, 26 d. 15'N., 127 d. 55'E. LST 557, by coastal defense gun, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 57'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine RO-46, by destroyers MERTZ (DD-691) and MONSSEN (DD-798), Okinawa area, 26 d. 09'N., 130 d. 21'E. Minesweeper NO. 3, by submarine PARCHE (SS-384), off Japan, 39 d. 06'N., 141 d. 57'E.

04/10 Tue. Army troops supported by naval bombardment and carrier aircraft land on Tsuken Shima, off east coast of Okinawa. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Motor minesweeper YMS-96, by collision, 26 d. 03' N., 127 d. 48'E. Submarine chaser SC-661, by grounding, 26 d. 11'N., 127 d. 55'E. LST 449, by coastal defense gun, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 57'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship MISSOURI (BB-63), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00 E. Aircraft carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Aircraft carrier ESSEX (CV-9), by dive bomber, 26 d. 50'N., 130 d. 30'E. Destroyer TRATHEN (DD-530), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 27 d. 13'N., 130 d. 15'E. Destroyer HALE (DD-642), by dive bomber, 26 d. 00' N., 120 d. 00'E. Destroyer BULLARD (DD-660), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Destroyer KIDD (DD-661), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00' N., 130 d. 00'E. Destroyer HANK (DD-702), by aerial strafing, 27 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Destroyer escort MANLOVE (DE-36), by aerial strafing, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 20'E. Destroyer escort SAMUEL S. MILES (DE-183), by suicide plane, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 20'E. Attack transport BERRIEN (APA-61), by collision, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 43'E. Attack cargo ship LEO (AKA-60), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. LST 399, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E.

04/10 The Oakland was assigned to Task Group 58.3 in which group she operated for the remainder of the Okinawa campaign.

04/11 Task Group 58.3 underwent a series of Japanese air attacks. Six planes were shot down by the group. The Oakland fired on five of the attackers. The ship claimed credit for destroying a low flying "Judy." After the attack a hole was discovered in Number 1 stack indicating the possibility that the "Judy" was strafing on her run-in. After the firing had subsided it was discovered that three of our shipmates had been seriouly injured at their battle stations. Every effort was made to save them but two of them died within the hour, the other man was restored to duty in several days. These were the first fatal battle casualties on the Oakland.

04/12 Thu. President Franklin D. Roosevelt dies Vice President Harry S. Truman succeeds to the Presidency. United States naval vessels sunk: Destroyer MANNERT L. ABELE (DD-733) , by piloted bomb, Okinawa area, 27 d. 25'N., 126 d. 59'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship NEW MEXICO (BB-40), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 31'N., 127 d. 37'E. Battleship IDAHO (BB-42), by suicide plane, 26 d. 26' N., 127 d. 32'E. Battleship TENNESSEE (BB-43), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer STANLY (DD-478), by piloted bomb, 27 d. 12'N., 128 d. 17'E. Destroyer PURDY (DD-734), by suicide plane, 27 d. 16' N.,127 d. 50'E. Destroyer ZELLARS (DD-777), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer CASSIN YOUNG (DD-793), by suicide plane, 27 d. 17'N., 127 d. 50'E. Destroyer escort RIDDLE (DE-185), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer escort RALL (DE-304), by suicide plane, 26 d. 36'N., 127 d. 39'E. Destroyer escort WALTER G. WANN (DE-412), by suicide plane, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 20'E. Destroyer escort WHITEHURST (DE-634), by suicide plane, 26 d. 04'N., 127 d. 12'E. Light minelayer LINDSEY (DM-32), by suicide plane, 26 d. 28'N., 127 d. 15'E. High-speed minesweeper JEFFERS (DMS-27), by suicide plane and piloted bomb, 26 d. 50 N., 126 d. 35'E. Minesweeper GLADIATOR (AM-319), by suicide plane, 26 d. 05'N., 127 35'E. Gasoline tanker WABASH (AOG-4), by collision, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Attack cargo ship WYANDOT (AKA-92), by collision, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 44'E. LST 555, by grounding, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 45'E.

04/12 On ths day the officers and men were called to quarters on the fantail to pay homage to their two shipmates killed on the previous day.

04/13 Fri. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer escort CONNOLLY (DE-306), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 55'N., 126 d. 46'E.

04/14 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship NEW YORK (BB-34), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer SIGSBEE (DD-502), by suicide plane, 27 d. 15'N., 130 d. 25'E. Destroyer DASHIELL (DD-659), by suicide plane, 27 d. 15'N., 130 d. 25' E. Destroyer HUNT (DD-674), by suicide plane, 27 d. 15'N., 130 d. 25'E. Gunboat PGM-11, by grounding, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 27'E. LST 241, by collision, 14 d. 38'N,, 140 d. 19'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Frigate NOMI, by submarine TIRANTE (SS-420), East China Sea, 33 d. 25'N., 126 d. 15'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 31, by submarine TIRANTE (SS-420), East China Sea, 33 d. 25'N., 126 d. 15'E.

04/14 The Oakland added a new experience to her war-time "bag of tricks" by refueling, rearming, and provisioning underway from ships of the train in the open sea.

04/15 Sun. Aircraft of fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher)attack airfields and aircraft on the ground in southern Kyushu, Japan strike is repeated on 16 April. Army troops land on Carabao Island at the entrance to Manila Bay, Luzon, P. I. landing is preceded by cruiser and destroyer bombardment and air attack. Submarine CHARR (SS-328) lays mines off the Malay Peninsula. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer WILSON (DD-408), by suicide plane, 26 d. 03'N., 127 d. 20'E. Destroyer LAFFEY (DD-724), by suicide plane, 27 d. 16'N., 127 d. 50'E. Oiler TALUGA (AO-61), by suicide plane, 26 d. 03'N., 127 d. 26'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-331, by suicide boat, 26 d. 15'N., 127 d. 36'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine RO-64, by mine, Japanese waters, 34 d. 14'N., 132 d. 16'E. Submarine RO-67, by mine, Japanese waters, 34 d. 00'N., 133 d. 00'E. Frigate MOKUTO, by mine, Japanese waters, 33 d. 53' N., 131 d. 03'E.

04/15 Task Group 58.3 swept northward and struck at southern Kyushu.

04/16 Mon. Army forces covered by naval gunfire and carrier aircraft land on Ie Shima, Ryukyu Islands. Carrier BOXER (CV-21), is commissioned at Newport News, Va., United States naval vessels sunk: Destroyer PRINGLE (DD-477) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 26'N., 126 d. 59'E. Submarine KARA (SS-369) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Carrier INTREPID (CV-11), by suicide plane, 27 d. 37' N., 131 d. 14'E. Battleship MISSOURI (BB-63), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Destroyer BRYANT (DD-665), by suicide plane, 27 d. 05'N., 128 d. 13'E. Destroyer MCDERMUT (DD-677), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 27 d. 30'N., 130 d. 20'E. Destroyer escort BOWERS (DE-637), by suicide plane, 26 d. 52'N., 127 d. 52'E. High-speed minesweeper HOBSON (DMS-26), by suicide plane, 27 d. 26'N., 126 d. 59'E. High-speed minesweeper HARDING (DMS-28), by suicide plane, 26 d. 42'N., 127 d. 25'E. Minesweeper CHAMPION (AM-314), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 73, by submarine SUNFISH (SS-281), off Honshu, Japan, 39 d. 36'N., 142 d. 05'E.

04/16 Task Group 58.3 continued attack on southern Kyushu. A "Frances" twin engine Jap Bomber, approached the formation at sunset. The Oakland assisted in shooting her down.

04/17 Tue. Army forces are landed near Malabang, Parang, and Cotabato on Mindanao, P. I., by naval attack group (Rear Adm. A. G Noble) landings arc supported by cruiser and destroyer gunfire and air attack. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer BENHAM (DD-796), by suicide plane and accidentally by United States naval gunfire, Okinawa area, 24 d. 01'N., 132 d. 32'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine RO-56, by submarine SEA OWL (SS-405), Central Pacific area, 19 d. 17'N., 166 d. 35'E.

04/17 to 05/10 Throughout this period Task Group 58.3 operated in support of the landings on Okinawa. Numerous attacks were made against our formation. On 17 April the Oakland destroyed one Kamikaze as it passed over the ship and crashed in flames nearby.

04/18 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Light cruiser MOBILE (CL-63), by explosion, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 52'E. Light minelayer TOLMAN (DM-28), by grounding, 26 d. 16'N., 127 d. 32'E, LST 929, by collision, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine I-56, by aircraft from light carrier BATAAN (CVL-29) and by destroyers HEERMANN (DD-532), MCCORD (DD-534), UHLMANN (DD-687), MERTZ (DD-691), and COLLETT (DD-730), Okinawa area, 26 d. 42'N., 130 d. 38'E.

04/20 Fri. Army troops supported by naval vessels and Army aircraft land on Catanduanes Island, P. I. Submarine GUITARRO (SS-363) lays mines off northeast coast of Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship COLORADO (BB-45), by explosion, Okinawa area 26 d. 10'N,, 127 d. 20'E. Destroyer AMMEN (DD-527), by horizontal bomber, Okinawa area, 27 d. 13'N,, 128 d. 16 E. Submarine chaser SC-737, by grounding, Sulu Sea, 09 d. 45'N., 118 d. 44'E.

04/22 Sun. United States naval vessels sunk: Minesweeper SWALLOW (AM-65) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 12'E. Submarine chaser SC-1019 , by grounding, Yucatan Channel 21 d. 28'N., 84 d. 30'W. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer FLUSSER (DD-368), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 07 d. 21'N,, 124 d. 13 E. Destroyer HUDSON (DD-475), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Destroyer WADSWORTH (DD-516), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 126 d. 24'E. Destroyer ISHERWOOD (DD-520), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 28'E. Light minelayer SHEA (DM-30), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper RANSOM (AM-283), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 28'E. Minesweeper GLADIATOR (AM-319), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E. Oiler WINOOSKI (A0-38), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 07 d. 21'N., 124 d. 13'E.

04/25 Wed. Carrier-based aircraft bomb enemy installations on Okino Daito Jima, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier STEAMER BAY (CVE-87), by collision, 24 d. 48'N., 131 d. 58'E. Destroyer HALE (DD-642), by collision, 24 d. 48'N., 131 d. 58'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine RO-109, by high-speed transport HORACE A. BASS (APD-124), Philippine Sea area, 21 d. 58'N., 129 d. 35'E. Minesweeper NO. 41, by submarine COD (SS-224), off China, 25 d. 53'N., 121 d. 08'E.

04/26 Thu. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer HUTCHINS (DD-476), by depth charge, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 49'E.

04/27 Fri. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Heavy cruiser WICHITA (CA-45), by coastal defense gun, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 50'E. Destroyer RALPH TALBOT (DD-390), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Destroyer WILLIAM D. PORTER (DD-579), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 43'E. Destroyer escort ENGLAND (DE-635), by suicide plane, 26 d. 40'N., 127 d. 40'E. High-speed transport RATHBURNE (APD-25), by suicide plane, 26 d. 26'N., 127 d. 36'E.

04/28 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer LANG (DD-399), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 11'N., 127 d. 20'E. Destroyer WADSWORTH (DD-516), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 47'N., 126 d. 38'E. Destroyer DALY (DD-519), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 12'N., 128 d. 16'E. Destroyer TWIGGS (DD-591), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 12'N., 128 d. 16'E. Destroyer BENNION (DD-662), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 26'N., 127 d. 51'E. High-speed minesweeper BUTLER (DMS-29), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Hospital ship COMFORT (AH-6), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 30'N., 127 d. 40'E. Hospital transport PINKNEY (APH-2), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-329 by mine, off Tarakan, Borneo, 03 d. 14'N., 117 d. 42'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk, off Honshu, Japan: Submarine chaser NO. 17, by submarine SPRINGER (SS-414), 32 d. 34'N., 128 d. 52'E. Repair ship HATSUSHIMA, by submarine SENNET (SS-408), 33 d. 58'N., 136 d. 17'E. Transport NO. 146, by submarine TREPANG (SS-412), 32 d. 24'N., 128 d. 40'E.

04/29 Sun. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer HAZELWOOD (DD-531), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 02'N., 129 d. 59'E. Destroyer HAGGARD (DD-555), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 01'N., 129 d. 40'E. Light minelayer SHANNON (DM-25), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Light minelayer HARRY F. BAUER (DM-26), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 47'N., 128 42'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-51 , by mine, off Tarakan, Borneo, 03 d. 18'N., 117 33'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine I-44, by aircraft (VC-92) from escort carrier TULAGI (CVE-72), Philippine Sea, 24 d. 15'N., 131 d. 16'E.

04/30 Mon. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer JENKINS (DD-447), by mine, off Tarakan, Borneo, 03 d. 12'N., 117 d. 37'E. Destroyer BENNION (DD-662), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 26'N., 127 d. 51'E. Minelayer TERROR (CM-5), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 18'E.

05/01 Tue. Naval attack force (Vice Adm. D. E. Barbey) lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, supported by naval gunfire and air attack. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine TRIGGER (SS-237) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor minesweeper YMS-481 , by coastal defense gun, Tarakan area, Borneo, 03 d. 26'N., 117 d. 32'E.

05/02 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged, Tarakan area, Borneo: Motor minesweeper YMS-334, by coastal defense gun, 03 d. 26'N., 117 d. 40'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-363, by mine, 03 d. 26'N., 117 d. 32'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-364, by coastal defense gun, 03 d. 26'N., 117 d. 32'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Frigate OJIKA, by submarine SPRINGER (SS-414), Yellow Sea, 33 d. 58'N., 122 d. 58'E.

05/03 Thu. Army forces land at Santa Cruz, Davao Gulf, P. I., under cover of a cruiser and destroyer (Rear Adm. A. G. Noble). United States naval vessels sunk, Okinawa area: Destroyer LUCE (DD-511) , by suicide plane, 26 d. 43' N., 127 d. 14'E. Destroyer MORRISON (DD-560) , by suicide plane, 27 d. 10'N., 127 d. 58'E. Destroyer LITTLE (DD-803) , by suicide plane, 26 d. 24'N., 126 d. 15'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Light cruiser BIRMINGHAM (CL-62), by suicide plane, 26 d. 19'N., 127 d. 43'E. Destroyer BACHE (DD-470), by suicide plane, 26 d. 01'N., 126 d. 53'E. Destroyer INGRAHAM (DD-694), by suicide plane, 27 d. 10'N., 127 d. 58'E. Destroyer LOWRY (DD-770), by suicide plane, 27 d. 12'N., 128 d. 17'E. High-speed minesweeper MACOMB (DMS-23), by suicide plane, 26 d. 01'N., 126 d. 53'E. Light minelayer SHEA (DM-30), by piloted bomb, 27 d. 26'N., 126 d. 59'E. Light minelayer AARON WARD (DM-34), by suicide plane, 26 d. 24'N., 126 d. 15'E. Cargo ship CARINA (AK-74), by suicide boat, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 50'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 25, by submarine SPRINGER (SS-414), Yellow Sea, 34 d. 38'N., 124 d. 15'E.

05/04 Fri. Japanese aircraft stage heavy attack on Yontan airfield, Okinawa, and United States naval vessels supporting Okinawa operation. Coordinated with the air strike, a minor Japanese counterlanding is attempted and repulsed. Fleet Air Wing 18 is established at Guam, Marianas Islands, for operations in the Forward Area, Central Pacific. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier SANGAMON (CVE-26), by suicide plane, 26 d. 01'N., 127 d. 26'E. Destroyer HUDSON (DD-475), by collision, 26 d. 01'N., 127 d. 26'E. Destroyer COWELL (DD-547), by suicide plane, 26 d. 11'N., 126 d. 35'E. Light minelayer GWIN (DM-33), by suicide plane, 26 d. 13'N., 126 d. 22'E. High-speed minesweeper HOPKINS (DMS-13), by suicide plane, 26 d. 32'N., 126 d. 58'E. Minesweeper GAYETY (AM-239), by piloted bomb, 26 d. 32'N., 126 58'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-311, accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-327, by suicide plane and accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 32'N., 126 d. 58 E. Motor minesweeper YMS-331, by suicide plane, 26 d. 32'N., 126 d. 58'E. Motor gunboat PGM-17, by grounding, 26 d. 42'N., 128 d. 01'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper NO. 20, by submarine TREPANG (SS-412), Yellow Sea, 34 d. 16'N., 123 d. 37'E.

05/05 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Seaplane tender ST. GEORGE (AV-16), by suicide plane, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 19'E. Surveying ship PATHFINDER (AGS-1), by suicide plane, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 53'E.

05/06 Sun. Naval landing force evacuates about 500 Marshallese from Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship SOUTH DAKOTA (BB-57), by accidental explosion, 26 d. 30'N., 129 d. 30'E. Floating drydock ARD-28, by horizontal bomber, 25 d. 33'N., 127 d. 27'E.

05/07 Mon. Germany surrenders unconditionally to the Western Allies and Russia at Reims, France.

05/07 Mon. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper NO. 29, by United States mine, Sea of Japan, 34 d. 02'N., 130 d. 54'E.

05/08 Tue. Submarine BREAM (SS-243), lays mines off the coast of French Indochina.

05/09 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer escort OBERRENDER (DE-344), by suicide plane, 26 d. 32'N., 127 d. 30'E. Destroyer escort ENGLAND (DE-635), by suicide plane, 26 d. 18'N., 127 d. 13'E.

05/10 Wed. Army troops are landed at Macajalar Bay, Mindanao, P. I., by naval attack group (Rear Adm. A. D. Struble). United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer BROWN (DD-546), by suicide plane, 26 d. 26'N., 127 d. 20'E. Light minelayer HARRY F. BAUER (DM-26), by suicide plane, 26 d. 25'N., 128 d. 31'E.

05/11 Fri. Japanese aircraft make heavy attack against United States shipping in Okinawa area, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Aircraft carrier BUNKER HILL (CV-17), by suicide plane, 25 d. 44'N., 129 d. 28'E. Destroyer EVANS (DD-551), by suicide plane, 26 d. 58'N., 127 d. 32'E. Destroyer HUGH W. HADLEY (DD-774), by piloted bomb, 26 d. 59'N., 127 d. 32'E. Go to this URL: http://members.xoom.com/usshadley for a full report of the action.

05/11 Enemy Kamihaze attacked the formation in force. The USS Bunker Hill was hit while steaming 2,000 yards from OAKLAND.

05/12 Sat. Destroyers support landing of Army troops on Tori Shima, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Battleship NEW MEXICO (BB-40), by suicide plane, 26 d. 11'N., 127 d. 43 E. Heavy cruiser WICHITA (CA-45), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 43'E.

05/12 Task Force 58 headed northward to attack Kyushu. Enemy suicide planes attacked one crashing into the USS Enterprise within our formation. Within a few minutes the Oakland took four separate raiders under fire. The ship's claim in assisting in the destruction of two of them was substantiated by the group commander.

05/13 Sun. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) commence 2-day attack on Kyushu airfields, Japan. United States naval vessels damaged: Aircraft carrier ENTERPRISE (CV-6), by suicide plane, off Honshu, Japan, 30 d. 23'N., 132 d. 36'E. Light carrier BATAAN (CVL-29), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, off Honshu, Japan, 30 d. 30' N., 132 d. 30'E. Destroyer BACHE (DD-470), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 01'N., 126 d. 53'E. Destroyer escort BRIGHT (DE-747), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 17'E.

05/13 to 05/28 Task Group 58.3 continued operations off the coast of Okinawa.

05/15 Tue. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine SNOOK (SS-279) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessel damaged: Escort carrier SHIPLEY BAY (CVE-85), by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minelayer HATSUTAKA, by submarine HAWKBILL (SS-366), off Malaya, 04 d. 54'N., 103 d. 28'E.

05/17 Thu. Carrier aircraft (Rear Adm. C. A. F. Sprague) strike Japanese shore installations on Taroa Island, Maloelap Atoll in the Marshall Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer DOUGLAS H. FOX (DD-779), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 59'N., 126 d. 54'E.

05/18 Fri. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer LONGSHAW (DD-559) , damaged by coastal defense gun, Okinawa area, 26 d. 11'N., 127 d. 37'E. sunk by United States forces. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: High-speed transport SIMS (APD-50), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. LST 808, by aircraft torpedo, 26 d. 42'N., 127 d. 47'E.

05/19 Sat. Destroyers bombard enemy installations on Paramushiro, Kurile Islands. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer escort VAMMEN (DE-644), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 24'N., 127 d. 53'E. Oiler CIMARRON (AO-22), by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 53'E. Motor gunboat PGM-1, by explosion, Luzon, Philippine Islands area, 14 d. 41'N., 121 d. 46'E.

05/20 Sun. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer THATCHER (DD-514), by suicide plane, 26 d. 33'N., 127 d. 29'E. Destroyer escort JOHN C. BUTLER (DE-339), by suicide plane, 26 d. 47'N., 127 52'E. High-speed transport TATTNALL (APD-19), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. High-speed transport CHASE (APD-54), by suicide plane, 26 d. 18'N., 127 d. 14'E. High-speed transport REGISTER (APD-92), by suicide plane, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 21'E. LST 808, by suicide plane, 26 d. 42'N., 127 d. 47'E.

05/21 Mon. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper NO. 34, by submarine CHUB (SS-329), Java Sea, 06 d. 15'S., 116 d. 01'E.

05/22 Tue. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine chasers NOs. 37 and 58, and transport NO. 173, by carrier-based aircraft, off southeastern Japan, 29 d. 45'N., 129 d. 10'E.

05/24 Thu. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. M. A. Mitscher) attack airfields in southern Kyushu, Japan. Japanese aircraft make concentrated attack on United States positions and ships at Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands strikes continue on 25 May. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine LAGARTO (SS-371) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier SUWANNEE (CVE-27), by explosion, 24 d. 00'N., 124 d. 00'E. Destroyer GUEST (DD-472), by suicide plane, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 44'E. Destroyer HEYWOOD L. EDWARDS (DD-663), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 43'E. Destroyer escort O'NEILL (DE-188), by suicide plane, 26 d. 20'N., 127 d. 43'E. Destroyer escort WILLIAM C. COLE (DE-641), by suicide plane, 26 d. 45'N., 127 d. 52'E. High-speed minesweeper BUTLER (DMS-29), by suicide plane, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 50'E, Minesweeper SPECTACLE (AM-305), by suicide plane, 26 d. 40'N., 127 d. 52'E. High-speed transport BARRY (APD-29), by suicide plane, 26 d. 30'N,, 127 d. 00'E. High-speed transport SIMS (APD-50), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 00'E.

05/25 Fri. United States naval vessel sunk: High-speed transport BATES (APD-47) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 41'N., 127 d. 47'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer COWELL (DD-547), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 41'N., 126 d. 50'E. Destroyer STORMER (DD-780), by suicide plane, 27 d. 06'N., 127 d. 38'E. High-speed transport ROPER (APD-20), by suicide plane, 26 d. 34'N., 127 d. 36'E.

05/26 Sat. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer ANTHONY (DD-515), by suicide plane, 26 d. 25'N., 128 d. 30'E. Destroyer BRAINE (DD-630), by suicide plane, 26 d. 25'N., 128 d. 30'E. High-speed minesweeper FORREST (DMS-24), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Submarine chaser PC-1603, by suicide plane, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 53'E. Surveying ship DUTTON (AGS-8), by suicide plane, 26 d. 15'N., 127 d. 59 E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser No. 172, by United States mine, off Honshu, Japan, 36 d. 48'N., 137 d. 05'E.

05/27 Sun. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer DREXLER (DD-741) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 06'N., 127 d. 38'E. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer escort GILLIGAN (DE-508), by aircraft torpedo, 26 d. 47'N., 127 d. 47'E. High-speed minesweeper SOUTHARD (DMS-10), by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper GAYETY (AM-239), by horizontal bomber, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. High-speed transport LOY (APD-56), by suicide plane, 26 d. 30'N., 127 d. 30'E. High-speed transport REDNOUR (APD-102), by suicide plane, 26 d. 29'N., 127 21'E. Attack transport SANDOVAL (APA-194), by suicide plane, 26 d. 15'N., 127 d. 51'E. Ocean tug PAKANA (ATF-108), by naval gunfire, 26 d. 22'N., 127 d. 44'E. Degaussing vessel YDG-10, by suicide plane, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E.

05/28 Mon. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer SHUBRICK (DD-639), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 38'N., 127 d. 05'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 29, by United States mine, off Kyushu, Japan, 33 d. 07'N., 129 d. 44'E.

05/28 Admiral W.F. Halsey, Jr., USN, assumed command of Task Force 58 when it joined the Third Fleet, with the title of Task Force 38.

05/29 Tue. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: High-speed transport TATUM (APD-81), by suicide plane, 26 d. 40'N., 127 d. 50'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-81, by grounding, 26 d. 16' N., 127 d. 52'E. LST 844, by grounding, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 51'E.

05/30 Wed. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine I-12, by aircraft (VC-13) from escort carrier Anzio (CVE-57), Philippine Sea, 22 d. 22'N., 134 d. 09'E.

06/01 Fri. United States Naval Air Facility, Peleliu Island, Palau Islands, is established. United States naval vessel damaged: Submarine chaser PC-1599, by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 25'N., 127 d. 43'E.

06/01 The Oakland came to rest in San Pedro Bay, Leyte Gulf, within sight of Tacloban, capital of Leyte Province. The Oakland had been underway a total of 63 days, the longest period thus far.

1 June to 1 July This period was spent at anchor in Leyte Gulf , with the exception of a three-day period at sea for operational training.

06/02 Sat. Aircraft of fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) bomb airfields in southern Kyushu, Japan attack is repeated on 3 June.

06/03 Sun. Naval task group (Rear Adm. L. F. Reifsnider) lands Marines on Iheya Shima, Ryukyu Islands. Carrier LAKE CHAMPLAIN (CV-39) is commissioned at Norfolk, Va. United States naval vessel damaged: Cargo ship ALLEGAN (AK-225), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E.

06/04 Mon. United States naval vessel damaged: Patrol vessel YP-41, by operational casualty, Okinawa area, 26 d. 18'N., 127 d. 52'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 112, by Army aircraft, Java Sea, 05 d. 00'S., 116 d. 04'E.

06/05 Tue. Typhoon in the Okinawa area, Ryukyu Islands, heavily damages United States naval vessels. United States naval vessels damaged by typhoon, Okinawa area: Battleship INDIANA (BB-58), 22 d. 51'N,, 132 d. 14'E. Battleship MASSACHUSETTS (BB-59), 22 d. 48'N., 132 d. 11'E. Battleship ALABAMA (BB-60), 22 d. 58'N., 132 d. 15'E. Battleship MISSOURI (BB-63), 23 d. 30'N., 131 d. 30'E. Aircraft carrier HORNET (CV-12), 22 d. 54'N., 132 d. 25'E. Aircraft carrier BENNINGTON (CV-20), 23 d. 03'N., 132 d. 04'E. Light carrier BELLEAU WOOD (CVL-24), 22 d. 45'N., 132 d. 10'E. Light carrier SAN JACINTO (CVL-30), 22 d. 53'N., 131 d. 55'E. Escort carrier WINDHAM BAY (CVE-92), 22 d. 37'N., 131 d. 34'E. Escort carrier SALAMAUA (CVE-96), 22 d. 30'N., 131 d. 56'E. Escort carrier BOUGAINVILLE (CVE-100), 22 d. 18'N,, 131 d. 53'E. Escort carrier ATTU (CVE-102), 22 d. 38'N., 131 d. 58'E. Heavy cruiser BALTIMORE (CA-68), 22 d. 48'N., 132 d. 14'E. Heavy cruiser QUINCY (CA-71), 22 d. 59'N., 132 d. 12'E. Heavy cruiser PITTSBURGH (CA-72), 22 d. 50'N., 132 d. 06'E. Light cruiser DETROIT (CL-8), 22 d. 17'N., 131 d. 48'E. Light cruiser SAN JUAN (CL-54), 22 d. 28'N., 132 d. 24'E. Light cruiser DULUTH (CL-87), 22 d. 55'N., 132 d. 12'E. Light cruiser ATLANTA (CL-104), 22 d. 46'N., 136 d. 12'E. Destroyer SCHROEDER (DD-501), 22 d. 48'N., 132 d. 14'E. Destroyer JOHN RODGERS (DD-574), 22 d. 45'N., 132 d. 10'E. Destroyer MCKEE (DD-575), 22 d. 54'N., 132 d. 19'E. Destroyer DASHIELL (DD-659), 22 d. 55'N., 132 d. 15'E. Destroyer STOCKHAM (DD-683), 22 d. 48'N., 132 d. 14'E. Destroyer DE HAVEN (DD-717), 22 d. 51'N., 132 d. 10'E. Destroyer MADDOX (DD-731), 22 d. 42'N., 132 d. 45'E. Destroyer BLUE (DD-744), 22 d. 51'N., 132 d. 25'E. Destroyer BRUSH (DD-745), 22 d. 34'N., 132 d. 22'E. Destroyer TAUSSIG (DD-746), 22 d. 43'N., 132 d. 04'E. Destroyer SAMUEL N. MOORE (DD-747), 22 d. 48'N., 132 d. 14'E. Destroyer escort DONALDSON (DE-44), 22 d. 35'N., 131 d. 56'E. Destroyer escort CONKLIN (DE-439), 22 d. 17'N., 131 d. 48'E. Destroyer escort HILBERT (DE-742), 22 d. 32'N., 131 d. 40'E. Oiler LACKAWANNA (AO-40), 22 d. 31'N., 131 d. 36'E. Oiler MILLICOMA (AO-73), 22 d. 12'N., 131 d. 36'E. Ammunition ship SHASTA (AE-6), 22 d. 17'N., 131 d. 48'E. United States naval vessels damaged: Battleship MISSISSIPPI (BB-41), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 09'N., 127 d. 35'E. Heavy cruiser LOUISVILLE (CA-28), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 07'N., 127 d. 52'E. Destroyer DYSON (DD-571), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 09'N., 127 d. 49'E. Minesweeper SCUFFLE (AM-298), by grounding, Brunei Bay area, 08 d. 01'N., 117 d. 13'E. Gasoline tanker SHEEPSCOT (AOG-24), by grounding, Iwo Jima area, 24 d. 46'N., 141 d. 18'E.

06/06 Wed. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Escort carrier NATOMA BAY (CVE-61), by suicide plane, 24 d. 46'N., 126 d. 37'E. Destroyer BEALE,(DD-471), by collision, 26 d. 10'N , 127 d. 20'E. Minesweeper REQUISITE (AM-109), by collision, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper SPEAR (AM-322), by collision, 26 d. 00' N., 127 d. 00'E. Light minelayer HARRY F. BAUER (DM-16), by suicide plane, 26 d. 14'N., 128 d. 01'E. Light minelayer J. WILLIAM DITTER (DM-31), by suicide plane, 26 d. 14'N., 128 d. 01'E. Gasoline tanker YAHARA (AOG-37), by collision, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 20'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 195, by United States mine, off Honshu, Japan, 37 d. 10'N., 137 d. 05'E.

06/07 Thu. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer ANTHONY (DD-515), by suicide plane, 27 d. 07'N., 127 d. 38'E. LST 540, by grounding, 26 d. 21'N., 127 d. 45'E.

06/08 Fri. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) attack Kanoya Airfield, Kyushu, Japan. Cruisers and destroyers (Rear Adm. R. S. Berkey) bombard enemy in Brunei Bay area, Borneo bombardment is repeated on 9 June. United States naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper SALUTE (AM-294) , by mine, Borneo area, 05 d. 08'N., 115 d. 05'E.

06/09 Sat. Naval task group (Rear Adm. L. F. Reifsnider) lands Marines on Aguni Shima, Ryukyu Islands. Naval task group (Rear Adm. A. W. Radford) bombs and bombards Okino Daito Jima, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer escort GENDREAU (DE-639), by coastal defense gun, Okinawa area, 26 d. 03'N., 127 d. 12'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel No. 41, by submarine SEA OWL (SS-405), off southern Korea, 34 d. 18'N., 127 d. 18'E.

06/10 Sun. Australian troops land at Brunei Bay, Borneo, supported by cruiser and destroyer gunfire (Rear Adm. R. S. Berkey) and strikes by United States Army and Australian aircraft. Naval task group (Rear Adm. J. J. Clark) bombs and bombards enemy airfield and other installations on Minami Daito, Ryukyu Islands. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer WILLIAM D. PORTER (DD-579) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 27 d. 06'N., 127 d. 38'E. Japanese submarine sunk: I-122, by submarine SKATE (SS-305), Sea of Japan, 37 d. 29'N., 137 d. 25'E.

06/11 Mon. Cruisers and destroyers (Rear Adm. J. H. Brown) bombard Japanese installations on Matsuwa, Kurile Islands. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Light cruiser VICKSBURG (CL-86), by collision, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 20'E. Landing ship dock LINDENWALD (LSD-6), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 53'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser No. 237, by United States naval land-based aircraft, Sea of Japan, 34 d. 35'N., 132 d. 20'E.

06/13 Wed. United States naval vessel damaged: Battleship IDAHO (BB-42), by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 57'E.

06/14 Thu. United States naval vessel damaged: Motor gunboat PGM-24, by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 30 N., 126 d. 00'E.

06/15 Fri. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer escort O'FLAHERTY (DE-340), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E.

06/16 Sat. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Maryland, is established. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer TWIGGS (DD-591) , by aircraft torpedo, Okinawa area, 26 d. 08'N., 137 d. 35'E. United States naval vessel damaged: Escort carrier STEAMER BAY (CVE-87), by aircraft operational casualty, Okinawa area, 24 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E.

06/17 Sun. United States naval vessel damaged: Gasoline tanker CHESTATEE (AOG-49), by collision, Luzon area, Philippine Islands, 07 d. 04'N., 122 d. 06'E.

06/18 Mon. Battleship and destroyers bombard shore installations on Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor minesweeper YMS-50 , damaged by mine, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 18'S., 116 d. 49'E. sunk by United States forces. United States naval vessel damaged: Seaplane tender (small) YAKUTAT (AVP-32), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 19'E.

06/19 Tue. United States naval vessels damaged: Minesweeper DEVICE (AM-220), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 127 d. 00'E. Minesweeper DOUR (AM-223), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'2, 127 d. 00'E. LST 562, by collision, Brunei Bay area, Borneo, 04 d. 29'N., 114 d. 01 E.

06/20 Wed. Aircraft from carrier task group (Rear Adm. R. E. Jennings) bomb enemy positions on Wake Island. United States naval vessel damaged: Motor minesweeper YMS-368, by mine, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 19'S., 116 d. 58'E.

06/21 Thu. Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, is declared secured 82 days after the landing. (See 1 April 1945.) United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer escort HALLORAN (DE-305), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 00'N., 128 d. 00'E. Seaplane tender CURTISS (AV-4), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 18'E. Seaplane tender KENNETH WHITING (AV-14), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 18'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-335, by coastal defense gun, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 18'S., 116 d. 50'E.

06/22 Fri. United States naval vessels damaged: High-speed minesweeper ELLYSON (DMS-19), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 04'N., 127 d. 55'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-10, by coastal defense gun, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 18'S., 116 d. 51'E. LST 534, by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 18' N., 127 d. 49'E.

06/23 Sat. United States naval vessel damaged: Motor minesweeper YMS-364, by coastal defense gun, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 19'S., 116 d. 52'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Java Sea: Submarine chasers NOs. 42, and 113, by submarine HARDHEAD (SS-365), 05 d. 50'S., 114 d. 18'E. Shuttleboat NO. 833, by submarine HARDHEAD (SS-365), 05 d. 50'S., 114 d. 18'E.

06/24 Sun. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer escort NEUENDORF (DE-200), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 10 d. 41'N., 122 d. 35 E. Motor minesweeper YMS-339 , accidentally by United States bomber, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 19' S., 116 d. 52'E.

06/24 The Oakland became the flagship of Commodore J.P. Womble, USN, Commander Task Flotilla Two.

06/26 Tue. Marines are landed on Kume Shima, Ryukyu Islands, by naval task group (Capt. C. A. Buchanan). United States naval vessels sunk, Balikpapan area, Borneo: Motor minesweeper YMS-39 , by mine, 01 d. 19'S., 116 d. 49'E. Motor minesweeper YMS-365 , damaged by mine, 01 d. 18'S., 116 d. 50'E sunk by United States forces.

06/27 Wed. United States naval vessel damaged: Seaplane tender (small) SUISUN (AVP-53), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 10'N., 127 d. 19'E. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer CALDWELL (DD-605), by mine, Brunei Bay area, Borneo, 05 d. 07'N., 115 d. 06'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine I-165, by naval land-based aircraft (VPB-142), Central Pacific area, 15 d. 28'N., 153 d. 39'E. Submarine chaser NO. 2, by submarine BLUEBACK (SS-326), Java Sea, 07 d. 25'S., 116 d. 00'E.

United States naval vessels damaged, Balikpapan area, Borneo: Destroyer SMITH (DD-378), by coastal defense gun, 01 d. 17'S., 116 d. 53'E. Minesweeper YMS-314, by mine, 01 d. 18'S., 116 d. 51'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Destroyer NARA, by mine, Sea of Japan, 33 d. 54'N., 130 d. 49'E.

07/01 Sun. Australian troops are landed at Balikpapan, Borneo, by naval attack group (Rear Adm. A. G. Noble) landing is covered by Allied naval gunfire and aircraft attack. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel No. 72, by submarine HADDO (SS-255), Yellow Sea, 38 d. 08' N., 124 d. 38' E.

07/01 The Oakland with Task Force 38 sortied from Leyte Gulf, setting easterly course upon departure from Surigao Straits.

07/02 Mon. Submarine BARB (SS-220) bombards enemy installations at Kaihyo Island off the east coast of Karafuto this is the first successful use of rockets against shore positions by a United States submarine. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 188, by mine, Sea of Japan, 33 d. 59'N., 130 d. 52'E.

07/03 Tue. United States naval vessel damaged: Oiler ASHTABULA (A0-51), by collision, Okinawa area, 25 d. 09'N., 128 d. 47'E.

07/05 Thu. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur announces the liberation of the Philippine Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer SMITH (DD-378), accidentally by depth charge, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 00'S., 117 d. 00'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Auxiliary submarine chaser NO. 37, by submarine LIZARDFISH (SS-373), off Java, Netherlands East Indies area, 08 d. 10'S., 114 d. 50'E. 07/09 Mon. United States naval vessel sunk: Motor minesweeper YMS-B4 , by mine, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 19'S., 116 d. 48'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Auxiliary submarine chaser NO. 50, by submarine BLUEFISH (SS-121), off Malaya, 02 d. 13'N., 105 d. 03'E.

07/10 Tue. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) attack airfields on the Tokyo plain, Japan. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser SC-511 , foundered, Solomon Islands area, 11 d. 03'S., 164 d. 50'E. United States naval vessel damaged: LST 1107, by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 21'N., 126 d. 47'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Destroyer SAKURA, by mine, Sea of Japan, 35 d. 50'N., 135 d. 20'E. Minesweeper No. 27, by submarine RUNNER (SS-476), off northern Honshu, Japan, 39 d. 20'N., 142 d. 07'E.

07/12 Thu. United States naval vessel damaged: Submarine chaser PC-582, by grounding, Philippine Islands area, 11 d. 05'N., 125 d. 20'E. 07/13 Fri. Italy declares war on Japan.

07/13 OAKLAND participated in. Strikes conducted against Hokkaido and northern Honshu.

07/14 Sat. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) bomb shipping, rail facilities, and ground installations in northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan attack is repeated on 15 July. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers (Rear Adm. J. F. Shafroth) bombard the coastal city of Kamaishi, Honshu, Japan this is the first naval gunfire bombardment of the Japanese homeland. United States naval vessels damaged: LST 684 and LST 816, by grounding, Okinawa area, 26 d. 12'N., 127 d. 57'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Destroyer TACHIBANA, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 41 d. 48'N., 140 d. 41'E. Submarine I-351, by submarine BLUEFISH (SS-222), off Borneo, 04 d. 30'N., 110 d. 00'E. Coast defense vessels NOs. 65 and 74, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 42 d. 21'N., 140 d. 59'E.

07/15 Sun. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers (Rear Adm. O. C. Badger) bombard steel and iron works at Muroran on southern coast of Hokkaido, Japan. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer FLUSSER (DD-368), by collision, Balikpapan area, Borneo, 01 d. 27'S., 117 d. 00'E. Light minelayer THOMAS E. FRASER (DM-24), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 50'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Minesweeper NO. 24, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 41 d. 38'N., 141 d. 00'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 219, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 41 d. 48'N., 140 d. 41'E.

07/16 Mon. First atomic bomb test is held at Alamogordo, N. Mex. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine I-13, by aircraft (VC-13) from escort carrier ANZIO (CVE-57) and by destroyer escort LAWRENCE C. TAYLOR (DE-415), east of Japan, 34 d. 28'N., 150 d. 55'E. Torpedo boat KARI, by submarine BAYA (SS-318), Java Sea, 05 d. 48'S., 115'53'E.

07/17 Tue. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Ad. J. S. McCain) and British fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. H. B. Rawlings, RN) attack airfields in the Tokyo area, Japan. British force continues to operate as part of the United States Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) until the termination of hostilities. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers (Rear Adm. O. C. Badger) bombard industrialized Mito-Hitachi area, Honshu, Japan.

07/17 to 07/20 Planes from Task Group 38.3 raided Tokyo plains area.

07/18 Wed. Aircraft from the fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) strike Yokosuka Naval Base and airfields in the Tokyo area, Japan. Cruisers and destroyers (Rear Adm. C. F. Holden) bombard shore installations at Cape Nojima, Honshu, Japan. Carrier-based aircraft bomb Wake Island. United States naval vessel damaged: Transport GEORGE F. ELLIOTT (AP-105), by unknown cause, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 50'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Coast defense vessel NO. 112, by submarine BARB (SS-220), off Karafuto, Japan, 46 d. 03'N., 142 d. 16'E.

07/19 Thu. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer THATCHER (DD-514), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 15'N., 127 d. 50'E.

07/20 Fri. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Minesweeper No. 39, by submarine THREADFIN (SS-41O), Yellow Sea, 35 d. 01'N., 125 d. 42'E.

07/21 Sat. United States naval vessel damaged: Attack transport MARATHON (APA-200), by piloted torpedo, Okinawa area, 26 d. 13'N., 127 d. 50'E.

07/22 Sun. Cruiser and destroyer task force (Rear Adm. J. H. Brown) bombard installations at Suribachi, Paramushiro, Kurile Islands.

07/23 Mon. Landing party from submarine Barb (SS-220) blows up an enemy train on east coast of Karafuto. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 227, by submarine HARDHEAD (SS-365), off Java, Netherlands East Indies, 08 d. 10'S., 115 d. 29'E.

07/24 Tue. Aircraft from the fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) launch 2-day attack on the Inland Sea area, Japan, striking Kure Naval Base and airfields at Nagoya, Osaka, and Miho. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer escort UNDERHILL (DE-682) , damaged by piloted torpedo, off Luzon, P. I., 19 d. 20'N., 126 d. 42'E, sunk by United States forces. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Inland Sea area, Japan: Battleship HYUGA, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 10' N.,132 d. 33'E. Battleship ISE, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 12'N., 132 d. 31'E. Battleship HARUNA, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 15' N.,132 d. 29'E. Escort carrier KAIYO, by carrier-based aircraft, Army aircraft and mine, 33 d. 21'N., 131 d. 32'E. Heavy cruiser AOBA, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 13'N., 1332 d. 31'E/ Old heavy cruiser IWATE, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 14'N., 132 d. 30'E.

07/24 - 25 Merchant and naval shipping in the Kure-Kobe area of the Inland Sea was attacked by Task Force 38 aircraft.

07/25 Wed. Cruisers and destroyers (Rear Adm. J. C. Jones) bombard Kushimoto Seaplane Base and airfield near Shiono Misaki, Honshu, Japan.

07/26 Thu. Potsdam Declaration calling for unconditional surrender is delivered to Japan. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer LOWRY (DD-770), by explosion, Philippine Sea, 19 d. 30'N., 128 d. 00'E.

07/27 Fri. United States naval vessel damaged: Cargo ship GANYMEDE (AK-104), by collision, Philippine Islands area, 11 d. 11'N., 125 d. 05'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Transport NO. 176, by Army aircraft, off southern Kyushu, Japan, 31 d. 00'N., 130 d. 33'E.

07/27 "Clean-up" strikes conducted against remaining shipping in Kure-Kobe area.

07/28 Sat. Aircraft from fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) strike Inland Sea area, between Nagoya, and Northern Kyushu, Japan Kure Naval Base is the principal target. United States naval vessel sunk: Destroyer CALLAGHAN (DD-792) , by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 43'N., 126 d. 55'E. CALLAGHAN is the last Allied vessel to be sunk by a suicide plane. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer PRICHETT (DD-561), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 25 d. 43'N., 126 d. 56'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Inland Sea area, Japan: Aircraft carrier AMAGI, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 11'N., 132 d. 30'E. Heavy cruiser TONE, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 14'N., 132 d. 27'E. Old heavy cruiser IZUMO, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 14'N., 132 d. 30'E. Light cruiser OYODO, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 13'N., 132 d. 25'E. Destroyer NASHI, by carrier-based aircraft, 34 d. 14'N., 132 d. 30'E. Submarine I-372, by carrier-based aircraft, 33 d. 00'N., 133 d. 00'E.

07/29 Sun. Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers (Rear Adm. J. F. Shafroth) bombard shops, aircraft factory, and other facilities at Hamamatsu, Honshu, Japan. United States naval vessels damaged, Okinawa area: Destroyer CASSIN YOUNG (DD-793), by suicide plane, 26 d. 08'N., 127 d. 58'E. High-speed transport HORACE A. BASS (APD-124), by suicide plane, 26 d. 17'N., 127 d. 34'E. Japanese naval vessel sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 207, by Army aircraft, off Kyushu, Japan, 32 d. 00'N., 130 d. 00'E.

07/30 Mon. Aircraft from fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) bomb airfields and industrial targets in central Honshu, Japan. United States naval vessels sunk: Heavy cruiser INDIANAPOLIS (CA-35) , by submarine torpedo, Philippine Sea, 12 d. 02'N., 134 d. 48'E. Submarine BONEFISH (SS-223) , Pacific Ocean area, reported as presumed lost. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Sea of Japan: Destroyer HATSUSHIMO, by mine, 35 d. 33'N., 135 d. 12'E. Frigate OKINAWA, by carrier-based aircraft, 35 d. 30' N., 135 d. 21'E.

07/30 Attention of Task Group 38.3 was shifted to industrial centers of Tokyo and Nagoya.

07/31 Tue. Destroyers bombard railroad yards and industrial area of Shimuzu, Japan. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer BANCROFT (DD-598), by collision, Luzon area, P. I., 14 d. 50'N., 120 d. 15'E.

08/01 Wed. Carrier aircraft and battleship strike enemy on Wake Island. United States naval vessel damaged: Battleship PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38), by coastal defense gun, Wake Island raid, 19 d. 20'N., 166 d. 30'E.

08/03 Fri. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer escort EARL V. JOHNSON (DE-702), by explosion, Philippine Sea, 20 d. 17'N., 128 d. 07'E. Attack cargo ship SEMINOLE (AKA-104), by collision, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 50'E.

08/01 - 07 Oakland spent the first week of August dodging a typhoon passing through the area east of Japan.

08/05 Sun. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer BRISTOL (DD-857), by collision, Iwo Jima area, 29 d. 00'N., 142 d. 00'E. 08/06 Mon. Atomic bomb is dropped on Hiroshima, Honshu, Japan. Carrier aircraft from naval task group (Vice Adm. J B. Oldendorf) strike enemy shipping in Tinghai Harbor, China. Carrier aircraft bomb Wake Island.

08/07 Tue. United States naval vessel sunk: Submarine BULLHEAD (SS-331) , Java Sea, (presumed date). Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine chaser NO. 66, by Army aircraft, near Truk, Caroline Islands, 07 d. 23'N., 151 d. 53'E. Coast defense vessel No. 39, by Army aircraft, Sea of Japan, 35 d. 06'N., 129 d. 03'E.

08/07 Task Group 38.3 headed northward to strike northern Honshu and Hokkaido. Typhoon conditions prevented attacks from being launched for two days.

08/09 Thu. Atomic bomb is dropped on Nagasaki, Kyushu, Japan. Aircraft from fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) attack airfields and shipping in northern Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan. Battleships and cruisers (Rear Adm. J. F. Shafroth) bombard industrial targets at Kamaishi, Honshu, Japan. Battleship, cruiser, and destroyers bombard Wake Island, Russia declares war on Japan. United States naval vessels damaged: Destroyer JOHN W. WEEKS (DD-701), accidentally by United States naval gunfire, off Honshu, Japan, 35 d. 00'N., 143 d. 00'E. Destroyer BORIE (DD-704), by suicide plane, off Honshu, Japan, 37 d. 21'N., 143 d. 45'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Minesweeper No. 33, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 38 d. 26'N., 141 d. 30'E. Frigate AMAKUSA, by United States and British carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 38 d. 26'N., 141 d. 30'E. Frigate INAGI, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 38 d. 26 N., 141 d. 30'E.

08/09 - 10 Concentrated air attacks directed at northern Honshu and Hokkaido area. Hundreds of floating mines were sighted adrift in our vicinity during these operations off the coast of Japan but none of the ships of Task Force 38 were damaged by them.

08/10 Fri. Aircraft from fast carrier task forces of the Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) attack shipping, airfields, and railroads in northern Honshu, Japan. Russian forces enter Korea. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Minesweeper NO. 1, by carrier-based aircraft, off northern Honshu, Japan, 38 d. 26'N., 141 d. 30'E. Transport NO. 21, by Army aircraft, Inland Sea, Japan, 33 d. 59'N., 132 d. 31'E.

08/10 - 13 Operations were curtailed during this period awaiting development of the Japanese peace negotiations.

08/11 Sat. United States naval vessel damaged: Destroyer MCDERMUT (DD-677), by naval gunfire, Kurile Islands area, 49 d. 30'N., 155 d. 01'E.

08/12 Sun. Cruisers and destroyers (Rear Adm. J. H. Brown) bombard Japanese installations on Matsuwa and Paramushiro Islands in the Kurile Islands. United States naval vessel damaged: Battleship PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38), by aircraft torpedo, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 50'E.

08/13 Mon. Aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) bomb targets in the Tokyo area, Japan. United States naval vessel damaged: Attack transport LAGRANGE (APA-124), by suicide plane, Okinawa area, 26 d. 14'N., 127 d. 52'E. Japanese naval vessels sunk: Submarine I-373, by submarine SPIKEFISH (SS-404), off China, 29 d. 02'N., 123 d. 53'E. Coast defense vessel NO. 6, by submarine ATULE (SS-403), off Hokkaido, Japan, 42 d. 16'N., 142 d. 12'E.

08/13 Tokyo Plains area was attacked by our aircraft.

08/14 Tue. Japan accepts the provisions of the Potsdam Declaration and agrees to surrender. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, USA, is named Supreme Allied Commander to receive the Japanese capitulation and conduct the occupation of Japan. Japanese naval vessels sunk, Sea of Japan: Coast defense vessel No. 13, by submarine TORSK (SS-423), 35 d. 42'N., 134 d. 35'E. Coast defense vessel No. 47, by submarine TORSK (SS-423), 35 d. 42'N., 134 d. 36'E.

08/15 Wed. Before the announcement of the end of hostilities is received, aircraft from fast carrier task force (Vice Adm. J. S. McCain) raid airfields in the Tokyo area, Japan heavy airborne opposition is encountered. Naval task group (Commodore R. W. Simpson) is established to liberate, evacuate, and extend medical care to Allied prisoners of war in Japan.

08/15 Planes from Task Group 38.3 were striking the Tokyo area when word was received that Japan had accepted our terms without reservation. Many Japanese planes attacked our ships concentrating on the picket destroyers who accounted for more than twenty of them.

08/17 Fri. Gen. Prince Higashikuni becomes Prime Minister of Japan and forms a new cabinet.

08/19 Commander Task Flotilla TWO, Commodore J.P. Womble, USN, and staff with a small group of officers and men from OAKLAND (this ship) transferred to a destroyer at sea, the first leg of a journey that was to place them in Sagami Wan with the first group of American ships to anchor in the Japanese waters. On 30 August this same group landed on Japanese soil at Yokosuka Naval Base, Honshu, Japan, where Commodore Womble assumed command of all US Naval Shore Activities.

08/20 Mon. Naval task force (Rear Adm. O. C. Badger) is formed to assume responsibility for the occupation of the Yokosuka Naval base, Japan.

08/21 Tue. Asiatic Wing, Naval Air Transport Service, is established at Oakland, Calif. Mili Atoll, Marshall Islands, surrenders this is the first enemy garrison to capitulate in the Pacific Ocean area. Surrender is accepted on board the destroyer escort LEVY (DE-162).

08/21 Oakland was relieved of duties as Commander of screening units of Task Group 38.3.

08/25 Sat. Aircraft from carrier task groups begin daily flights over Japan to patrol airfields, shipping movements, and to locate and supply prisoner of war camps operation continues until 2 September 1945.

08/27 Mon. Third Fleet (Adm. W. F. Halsey) stands into Sagami Bay, the outer bay to Tokyo, Japan. Two Japanese submarines surrender to four United States destroyers off Honshu, Japan.

08/27 Captain Allen P. Calvert, USN, relieved Captain Kendall S. Reed, USN, as Commanding Officer.

08/28 Tue. Air Force Technicians land at Atsugi Airdrome, near Tokyo these are the first United States troops to land in Japan. Administrative and operational control of the Seventh Fleet (Adm. T. C. Kinkaid) passes from Commander in Chief Southwest Pacific Area (General of the Army Douglas MacArthur) to Commander in Chief Pacific Fleet (Fleet Adm. C. W. Nimitz).

08/29 Wed. Japanese submarine surrenders to submarine SEGUNDO (SS-398), off northeast Honshu, Japan.

08/29 Task Group 38.3 steams to operating area in the vicinity of the southern tip of Kyushu for the support of the occupation of Japan.

08/30 Thu. Landings by the occupation forces begin in the Tokyo Bay area under cover of guns of the Third Fleet plus Naval and Army aircraft. Yokosuka Naval Base surrender is accepted by Rear Adm. R. B. Carney and Rear Adm. O. C. Badger. Headquarters of Commander Third Fleet is established at Yokosuka Naval Base.

08/30 Commander THIRD Fleet directed the Oakland to proceed to Toyka Bay and report to Commander Task Force 31, Commander Naval Landing Force, Yokosuka.

08/31 Fri. Marcus Island surrender is accepted by Rear Adm. F. E. M. Whiting on board destroyer BAGLEY (DD-386). Marines land at Tateyama Naval Base, Honshu, Japan, and accept its surrender.

08/31 Oakland at in Tokyo Bay outside the breakwater of the Yokosuka Naval Base.

SEPTEMBER 1945 09/02 Sun. Japanese surrender documents are signed on board the battleship MISSOURI (BB-63) at anchor in Tokyo Bay, Japan. General of the Army Douglas MacArthur signs for the Allied Powers, and Fleet Adm. C. W. Nimitz signs for the United States. Army forces are landed at Yokohama, Japan, by naval task force (Rear Adm. J. L. Hall). Truk in the Caroline Islands, Pagan and Rota Islands in the Marianas Islands, and the Palau Islands surrender to United States Naval and Marine officers on board naval vessels.

09/02 Surrender ceremonies aboard the Missouri were witnessed by the officers and men of the Oakland from their berth nearby.


Driving Record/Motor Vehicle Report (MVR)

You can order your driving record or motor vehicle report (MVR) with your state's Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), Secretary of State (SOS), Department of Revenue (DOR), Department of Public Safety (DPS), or Motor Vehicle Division (MVD).

Your driving record/MVR contains information about your driving history including:

  • Status of drivers license
  • Traffic accidents.
  • Driving record points.
  • Traffic law violations, convictions and fines.
  • DUI public records.
  • Whether your driver license is valid, suspended or cancelled.

NOTE: If you're looking for a free driver's license status check, a free drivers license lookup, or a free MVR report, most states charge a small fee to access your driving record. Beware of services that say you can check your driving record free online. In addition, if you're asking how can I find my drivers license number, or what's my driver's license number, this can be answered with a simple call to the MVR. Remember most sites that say you can check drivers license status free, are only going to provide you with limited information and then they might try to sell you something.

Driving records are used for background checks, in court proceedings, and by insurance agencies to adjust your policy rates/premiums and investigate claims. If someone has asked to search by drivers license number, they are most likely referring to checking your driving record status.


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Product Description

USS Ticonderoga CVA 14

1960 Westpac Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Ticonderoga CVA 14 cruise book during 1960. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Hawaii, Yokosuka Japan, Kobe, Okinawa and Osaka Japan, Subic Bay Philippines, Hong Kong.
  • Brief History of the Ship
  • Carrier Air Group Five
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Crew Roster (Sorted by Division)
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plas Much More

Over 916 pictures on 300 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this aircraft carrier during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Ticonderoga CVA 14 (National Archives)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • Must have a computer to view the CD.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Watch the video: Aircraft Carrier Anchor Drop Forecastle Anchor Room