USS Glennon DD620 - History

USS Glennon DD620 - History

Glennon

James Henry Glennon, born 11 February 1857 at French Gulch, Calif., was appointed a cadet midshipman on 24 September 1874. He served as a midshipman in Lackawanna, Alaska and Pensacola, and later as an officer in Ranger (1881-85) and Constellation (1885-88). He commanded a forward gun turret in Massachusetts when that battleship on 4 July 1898 joined Texas in sinking the Reina Mercedes. While executive officer and navigator in Vicksburg, he participated in the actions against the Philippine Insurgents. During 1912 to 1913 he was President of the Board of Naval Ordnance and of the Joint Army Navy Board on Smokeless Powder.

He served as Commandant of the Washington navy Yard and Superintendent of the Naval Gun Factory from 1915 to early 1917 when he was appointed the Navy Department representative in a special mission under Elihu Root sent to Russia. At the risk of his life, he persuaded mutinous Russian sailors who had taken over command of Russian shipsof-war in waters of Sevastapol, to restore authority to the officers of the men-of-war After completing the mission to Russia, he took command of Battleship Division 5 with his flag in battleship Connecticut. He was awarded the Navy Cross for meritorious service in this command, including the instruction of midshipmen and thousands of recruits for duty as armed guard crews of merchant ships. Detached from this duty on 17 September 1918, he became Commandant of the 13th Naval District until 3 January 1919, then was Commandant of the 3d Naval District at New York. Having reached the statutory age for retirement, he was transferred to the Retired List oh 1 February 1921. Rear Admiral James Henry Glennon died at Washington, D.C., 29 May 1940.

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(DD-620: dp. 1,620; 1. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'4"; s. 37.5 k; cpl. 270; a. 4 5", 2 40mm., 5 20mm., 5 21" tt.,a: dcp., 2 dct.; cl. Gleaves )

The first Glennon (DD-620) was launched 26 August 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Miss Jennne Lejeune Glennon, granddaughter; and commissioned 8 October 1942, Lt. Comdr. Floyd C. Camp in command.

After shakedown training along the New England coast, Glennon guarded troops and supply convoys for the occupation of Sicily (9-15 July 1943). It was here that the giant assault on Europe began sweeping in from the sea. She returned to New York on 3 December 1943, then made two round-trip convoy escort voyages to the British Isles and one to Gibraltar. She arrived in New York from Gibraltar on 22 April 1944 and stood out of that port 5 May with a task group which arrived Belfast, Ireland, on the 14th. Assigned to Assault Force "U" of the Western Naval Task Force, she arrived in the Baie de la Seine, France, on 6 June. After patrolling around the bombardment group for submarines and fast German torpedo boats, she joined in gunfire support of troops ashore.

On 7 June she hurled in 430 5-inch shells ashore in Support of troops advancing north toward Quineville. Under command of Comdr. Clifford A. Johnson, she was again approaching her gunfire support station at 0830, 8 June when her stern struck a mine. A whaleboat picked up survivors while minesweepers Stay and Threat arrived on the scene, one passing a towline while the other swept ahead of the damaged destroyer. Destroyer escort Rich closed in tho wake of the minesweepers to assist, then felt a heavy explosion as she slowly rounded Glennon's stern to clear the area. Minutes later a second explosion blew off a 50-foot section of Rich's stern, followed by a third mine explosion under her forecastle. She went under within 15 minutes of the first explosion.

Minesweeper Staff found she could not budge Glennon whose fantail seemed to be firmly anchored to the bottom by her starboard propeller. Most of her crew boarded Staff and those remaining on Glennon lightened her stern by Pumping fuel forward and jettisoning depth charges and topside gear. On 9 June salvage equipment was assembled; and some 60 officers and men of the Glennon came back on board. The following morning, just as Comdr. Johnson was preparing to resume efforts to save his ship, a German battery near Quinneville found her range. A second salvo hit Glennon amidships and cut off all power. After a third hit, Commander Johnson ordered abandon ship and the men were taken off in a landing craft. Glennon floated until 2145, 10 June 1944, then rolled over and sank. She suffered 25 lost and 38 wounded.

Glennon was awarded two battle stars for services in World War II.


Glennon was launched on 26 August 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Company, of Kearny, New Jersey, sponsored by Miss Jeanne Lejeune Glennon, granddaughter of Admiral Glennon, and commissioned on 8 October 1942, with Lieutenant Commander Floyd C. Camp in command.

After shakedown training along the New England coast, Glennon guarded troops and supply convoys for the Amphibious Battle of Gela (9–15 July 1943). It was here that the giant assault on Europe began sweeping in from the sea. She returned to New York on 3 December 1943, then made two round-trip convoy escort voyages to the British Isles and one to Gibraltar. She arrived in New York from Gibraltar on 22 April 1944, and stood out of that port on 5 May with a task group which arrived at Belfast, Northern Ireland, on the 14th. Assigned to Assault Force "U" of the Western Naval Task Force, she arrived in the Baie de la Seine, France, on 6 June. After patrolling around the bombardment group for submarines and fast German torpedo boats, she joined in gunfire support of troops ashore.

On 7 June, she hurled in 430 5 inch shells ashore in support of troops advancing north toward Quinéville. Under command of Commander Clifford A. Johnson, she was again approaching her gunfire support station at 08:30, 8 June, when her stern struck a mine. A whaleboat picked up survivors while minesweepers Staff and Threat arrived on the scene, one passing a towline while the other swept ahead of the damaged destroyer. The destroyer escort Rich closed in the wake of the minesweepers to assist, then felt a heavy explosion as she slowly rounded Glennon's stern to clear the area. Minutes later a second explosion blew off a 50-foot section of Rich's stern, followed by a third mine explosion under her forecastle. Rich sank within 15 minutes of the first explosion.

The minesweeper Staff found she could not budge Glennon, whose stern seemed to be firmly anchored to the bottom by her starboard propeller. Most of her crew boarded Staff, and those remaining on Glennon lightened her stern by pumping fuel forward and jettisoning depth charges and topside gear. On 9 June, salvage equipment was assembled, and some 60 officers and men of the Glennon came back on board. The following morning, just as Cdr. Johnson was preparing to resume efforts to save his ship, a German shore battery near Quinéville found her range. A second salvo hit Glennon amidships and cut off all power. After a third hit, Cdr. Johnson ordered his crew to abandon ship and the men were taken off in a landing craft. Glennon floated until 21:45, 10 June 1944, then rolled over and sank. She suffered 25 lost and 38 wounded.

Glennon was awarded two battle stars for services in World War II.


USS Glennon DD620 - History

Today is the 13th of July 1944, I'm Commander C.A. Johnson, United States Navy, former commanding officer of the USS Glennon, DD620.

It was my privilege to be commanding officer of that ship during its last nine months. I placed the ship in commission under Commander F.C. Camp, then commanding officer, myself being executive officer, in October 1942. The ship since then has completed seventeen successful convoy cross-without the loss of a single ship in the convoy.

This ship was engaged in the Sicilian invasion in July 1943 and its spendid shore fire control worked at that time. The only previous time that the ship had been hit in any manner or form was at Palermo on the 31st. of July 1943, when the Germans made a large determined attack on the ships in the harbor. The Glennon was strafed at that time, wounding sixteen men on the starboard side of the bridge. The plane that strafed the ship at that time had just bombed a British light cruiser anchored on our starboard beam where they scored a near miss. I was on the port side of the ship at the time, saw the plane. Before we could get to the plane, she came up out of her dive at about 150 feet, crossed over the ship and fired with her after-machine guns.

By the time I arrived on the starboard side of the bridge, the wounded were laying both inside and outside on the bridge. There were only two men who were seriously wounded and the others had minor shell fragment wounds. The plane apparently got away scot-free, although out of fifty planes making the raid that night, nine were shot down by both aircraft and AA battery fire.

From the 1st. of August, 1943, when we started to leave the Mediterranean until the invasion of France in the Bay of the Seine, in June 1944, the Glennon was occupied in transporting troop convoys to Scotland for the forthcoming invasion. These convoys in the North Atlantic, undoubtedly many of our troops who are now fighting in France will remember the weather of the North Atlantic during these crossings. It was typical North Atlantic winter weather.

About the end of April we began to wonder whether our ship was going to actually take part in the forthcoming invasion which had been played up very strongly in the newspapers but which we had heard nothing official about as yet. However, the orders began to come in with indications that we were going across with an entirely combatant convoy which looked to me very much like the beginning of the invasion to come.

On the sixth of May, we left New York proceeded to England with the Destroyer Squadron Seventeen plus the Plunkett , convoying the USS Quincy , a new United States cruiser.

On arrival Destroyer Squadron Seventeen reported to Commander of the Twelfth Fleet for duty. From that time on, until the invasion, time was taken up in actual practices for shore fire control and for action against German E-boats. All of this training was taken by all hands in a serious mood and excellent results were obtained. By this time, it was absolutely apparent to all hands that the ship was ultimately destined to take part in the invasion. Both the officiers and men seemed very happy and keyed up to the situation

Shortly after arrival in the United Kingdom the commanding officer started to receive voluminous reports and operation orders for the forthcoming invasion. He was unable to disclose at any time to anyone the nature of the orders that had been received. However, on the 25th of May, the order came through to release the information to those people that were required to know in order to get them thoroughly acquanted with their job.

Ports Jammed With Shipping

The plans were so well made and it was evident in our travels around the United Kingdom at this time that this invasion was going to be larger than anything that we had seen before this time. The ports of the United Kingdom were jammed with shipping. It seemed miraculous to myself and to most of the other people present at that time that the Germans were not taking advantage of this apparent tremendous shipping in these ports by making air attacks on them. Weak raids were made but at no time did I see a determinded air attack during this period.

The actual place where the ships of the bombardment group were assembled was at Belfast in the Bangor Lough. There, the same situation existed as existed throughout the whole of the United Kingdom, the anchorage had to be set down very carefully in order to get all the ships in the harbor. These were most all of them combatant ships including battleships, cruisers and a large number of destroyers.

Finally the word came setting D-Day as of the 5th of June 1944, 0600, being H-hour. That meant that we were going to have to get underway from Belfast on the 3rd in order to bring the heavy bombardment ships on station at H-hour. On the morning of the fourth, we received word that the invasion had been delayed 24 hours making H-hour on our beach, 6:30 on the morning of the sixth. This delay was taken in stride without any undue difficulties by any of the forces involved. A turn-around was made and another turn-around made twelve hours later.

The actual approach on the afternoon of the fifth was really remarkable in the large number of ships taveling down their specific lanes all over the southern coast of England. There was every type of ship known by both the British and American Navies in those formations. These ships had to make schedules and they were adjusting their speeds from time to time in very fast tidal waters in order to make the proper time at their destination. These ships did very well.

In the approach the Glennon was leading the shore bombardment group assigned to Utah beach.

The approach was made without incident, sighting no German aircraft or no German surface craft. There was periodic firing to the eastward of us and also to the westward of us in the vicinity of Cherbourg. This was taken to be E-boats trying to make an attack on the forces but being definitely stopped by our own forces who were patrolling that area.

Arrived On Schedule

We arrived in the transport area and the shore bombardment area on schedule and from that time on everything clicked off in accordance with previous plan. The paratroopers apparently had landed as their large number of planes were seen coming out. A very heavy barrage and bombardment was laid down by anti-aircraft on the beaches about H minus 4. This barrage was something that I have never experienced before

We were approximately 15,000 yards off the beach and the ship shook very violently during this entire barrage. There was an immense amount of dust blown to seaward and it came almost as a cloud. When the aircraft had finished their job, the shore bombardment ships opened up heavy fire on pre-determined targets on the beach. Targets were machine gun nests, batteries of all types, and shocked the Germans just before the arrival of the first wave of troops on Utah beach. Apparently the first wave was very successful because shortly after H-hour, we heard the announcement that our troops had breeched the seawall just behind Utah beach and were going ahead on into the country beyond.

Shortly after H-hour the Glennon received orders to proceed into this near shore fire support areas and to contact its shore fire control party ashore and give them support that they would ask for. We proceeded into the beach by way of the central boat lane and I was amazed at the quietness of the inshore area.

Invasion was not yet four hours old but the beaches were being worked thoroughly, the ships were going in apparently according to schedule and everything was quiet, there didn't seem to be any sign of confusion at the time. I arrived on my shore fire control station and was unable to get any targets from my shore fire control party ashore apparently due to the fact that they were moving so fast that they didn't require support from me.

That day proceeded without incident as far as the ship was concerned except for the firing of a few rounds at a battery which fired very short of us. It was also noted later in the afternoon that very heavy fire was laid down on the beaches causing the beaches to be closed for some three to four hours while this battery that was laying down the fire could be located and silenced.

That night was spent in the shore fire control, shore bombardment area, screening our heavy shore bombardment ships. There was a light air raid during the night. Some bombs landed fairly close, nothing serious. There was a low cloud formation, no plances were seen definitely enough to fire upon them. Our own Allied aircraft were able to chase them out of the area very shortly after they arrived.

The next morning the ship was ordered to a new shore fire control station off Quineville about two miles. This day was very much more satisfying to myself and to the officiers and crew. We fired at numerous targets that were designated by the shore fire control party, were able to dodge a few shells from the beach German batteries and were able to help our own Army stop a counter-attack late that afternoon.

Screened Bombardment Ship

This was rather interesting to us. We received a very hurried call for support and were told to be very careful as our troops were being counter-attacked and if the fire should be off very much why we'd fire on our own troops. However we went ahead fired about 200 rounds as directed by our shore fire control party, receiving very enthusiastic reports from them on completion of the fire that the enemy had been turned back completely as a result of the fire we laid down, and had retreated beyond the immediate sight of their positions.

That night we went back to screen our heavy shore bombardment ships again. Again that ngiht there were numerous air attacks with some bombs and mines falling in the area.

The next morning, the 8th of June, D plus 2, we were back at our station, on previous day's station by sunrise. A 8:03 there was a terrible explosion in the vicinity of our port quarter. Immediate information was that we had struck or detonated an acoustic mine. The after section of the ship immediately started to part about fifty feet from the stern. The stern settled rapidly and it was found that the ship was anchored fast by the stern.

There were numerous men who were able to get clear of the compartments below and they were in the water with no ships in the immediate vicinity. We immediately put our own motor whale boat in the water to pick these men up. We were very fortunate in being able to get to all except one of these men, all of whom had been quite badly wounded.

It was a very short time before two mine sweepers closed the ship and attempted to tow the ship off the beach. This was unsuccessful. They decided to evacuate as many personnel as we could, including the wounded, only keeping those personnel that it would require to salvage the ship and to man our guns that remained.

A tug was asked for to pull the ship off the beach and was sent in later that morning.

The first thing I noticed, the first one off the ship in this instance was our dog by the name of Gismo. He came to us just before we left New York. We had him alongside the dock and we put him off three times but just as we shoved off, he made one leap and managed to grab the ship. We thought at that time if he was so anxious to make the trip, why we would let him come along but I notice that he was the first one to get off. I had been a little bit worried up to this moment as to whether he actually was still on board but he seemed happy with his tail wagging.

The next few hours was spent mostly in trying to reduce the flooding in the after engine room and in the after living spaces still remaining with the ship. This was comparatively easy work and was brought quickly under control and it was thought perhaps that we could pull the ship off on high tide. The tug arrived just before high tide and made every effort to pull us off without success. The ship was turned through some 720 degrees finally in attempting to shear off the stern without any results.

It was then determined that we would attemt to cut the shafts, particularly the starboard shaft in order to push it out and probably that was what was holding us. This would free the ship and permit it to be towed away. While preparations to do this were going on, I received a dispatch from Commander Task Force Utah to abandon all further attempts at salvage, remove the crew and put them on an LST bound for the United Kingdom. It was known by the commanding officer that if this order was carried out, the after engine room would flood, the after living space would flood and while the ship would remain afloat, salvage operations would definitely be hampered.

We decided to take off all except enough men to keep the boiler in operation who could ride the motor whale boat out later and for myself to go to Admiral Moon, the Task Force Commander, and attemt to have the order changed in order to permit our boilers to remain in under fire to keep our pumps on the flooding spaces.

This was obtained that night and our crew was returned to the ship late the next afternoon. Full salvage operations by the ship's crew were underway late the next afternoon and we expected that on the eighth or rather the tenth we would be able to get the ship clear and be towed out.

Glennon Badly Holed

However on the morning of the tenth at 0700, the same German battery which had been giving a great deal of trouble both on the beaches and to the shore bombardment ships opened fire with extremely accurate fire. Their first salvo was short, their second salvo was a straddle hitting us in the after engine room. I tried to locate the battery at that time but was unable to do so. The battery was apparently hidden or well camouflaged. There was no smoke or flash visible from the ship.

After the third salvo had landed and hit forward, we decided to abandon ship in an LCM that we had close aboard. Already three men had been wounded on deck, the shells being anti-personnel shells, high explosive, bursting both on impact with the ship and in the water. Evacuation was carried out quickly and while the LCM was hauling away from the ship, there were mumerous shell bursts close aboard, three holes being put in the side of the LCM.

Afer being some distance away from the ship it was found that three men had been left on board. We had to get the wounded men we there already to some medical aid so we put through the picket line about a mile away, went close aboard a PT boat there, took off some men and sent the LCM on to obtain medical assistance for those men that had been wounded.

I took ten men and got a PT boat to return to the ship. The heavy shore bombardment ships by this time had opened up on the shore battery which had been shelling the ship and succeeded in silencing it, for the moment anyway. When we arrived back on the ship, it was found that the Glennon was badly holed all the way from the water line to its tops and from the after part to the stem. It was figured that their was at least five hits in the ship at that time and that question of salvage was no longer possible, at least by the ship's force, so we decided to put the fires out from under the boilers and to proceed to the transport area and obtain instructions form the Task Force Commander.

The three men were found, only one of which had been wounded after the former people had left the ship. They had done an excellent job and in keeping the fires going in the boiler and also putting out a small fire aft.

The ship had been hit on the bridge, destroying most of the bridge equipment and hit in the sound room, also in the radar room, radio room the forward fire room and two hits through the deck into officier's country and the CPO quarters forward. These hits wee known at that time.

After leaving the ship, we received instructions from the Task Force Commander to put the people on LST 381 return to the United Kindgom there to have a salvage party of 50 men and one officer, the commanding officer, to return when salvage operations became possible. As the LST was not getting underway immediately, the executive officer went back later that afternoon to inspect the damage and to get a few of his own clothes from the ship. The gunnery officer and a Chief Radar Technician went along with them. They found out that we had not counted all the hits earlier or there had been more shelling between the time we left and the time he returned because now there were 11 full shell hits in the ship and numerous near misses causing fragment holes thoughout the ship

It was thought that the ship would remain afloat as long as she was anchored by the stern but once she cast loose there, why, the numerous fragment holes thoughout the full length of the ship would undoubtedly flood practically all compartments forward and aft. The ship start to list heavily that night about 2200 and sank shortly thereafter.

Transcribed and formatted for HTML by Bill Anderson for the HyperWar Foundation


USS Glennon DD620 - History

James Henry Glennon, born 11 February 1857 at French Gulch, Calif., was appointed a cadet midshipman on 24 September 1874. He served as a midshipman in Lackawanna, Alaska and Pensacola, and later as an officer in Ranger (1881-85) and Constellation (1885-88). He commanded a forward gun turret in Massachusetts when that battleship on 4 July 1898 joined Texas in sinking the Reina Mercedes. While executive officer and navigator in Vicksburg, he participated in the actions against the Philippine Insurgents. During 1912 to 1913 he was President of the Board of Naval Ordnance and of the Joint Army Navy Board on Smokeless Powder.

He served as Commandant of the Washington navy Yard and Superintendent of the Naval Gun Factory from 1915 to early 1917 when he was appointed the Navy Department representative in a special mission under Elihu Root sent to Russia. At the risk of his life, he persuaded mutinous Russian sailors who had taken over command of Russian shipsof-war in waters of Sevastapol, to restore authority to the officers of the men-of-war After completing the mission to Russia, he took command of Battleship Division 5 with his flag in battleship Connecticut. He was awarded the Navy Cross for meritorious service in this command, including the instruction of midshipmen and thousands of recruits for duty as armed guard crews of merchant ships. Detached from this duty on 17 September 1918, he became Commandant of the 13th Naval District until 3 January 1919, then was Commandant of the 3d Naval District at New York. Having reached the statutory age for retirement, he was transferred to the Retired List oh 1 February 1921. Rear Admiral James Henry Glennon died at Washington, D.C., 29 May 1940.

(DD-620: dp. 1,620 1. 348'4" b. 36'1" dr. 17'4" s. 37.5 k cpl. 270 a. 4 5", 2 40mm., 5 20mm., 5 21" tt.,a: dcp., 2 dct. cl. Gleaves )

The first Glennon (DD-620) was launched 26 August 1942 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. Kearny, N.J. sponsored by Miss Jennne Lejeune Glennon, granddaughter and commissioned 8 October 1942, Lt. Comdr. Floyd C. Camp in command.

After shakedown training along the New England coast, Glennon guarded troops and supply convoys for the occupation of Sicily (9-15 July 1943). It was here that the giant assault on Europe began sweeping in from the sea. She returned to New York on 3 December 1943, then made two round-trip convoy escort voyages to the British Isles and one to Gibraltar. She arrived in New York from Gibraltar on 22 April 1944 and stood out of that port 5 May with a task group which arrived Belfast, Ireland, on the 14th. Assigned to Assault Force "U" of the Western Naval Task Force, she arrived in the Baie de la Seine, France, on 6 June. After patrolling around the bombardment group for submarines and fast German torpedo boats, she joined in gunfire support of troops ashore.

On 7 June she hurled in 430 5-inch shells ashore in Support of troops advancing north toward Quineville. Under command of Comdr. Clifford A. Johnson, she was again approaching her gunfire support station at 0830, 8 June when her stern struck a mine. A whaleboat picked up survivors while minesweepers Stay and Threat arrived on the scene, one passing a towline while the other swept ahead of the damaged destroyer. Destroyer escort Rich closed in tho wake of the minesweepers to assist, then felt a heavy explosion as she slowly rounded Glennon's stern to clear the area. Minutes later a second explosion blew off a 50-foot section of Rich's stern, followed by a third mine explosion under her forecastle. She went under within 15 minutes of the first explosion.

Minesweeper Staff found she could not budge Glennon whose fantail seemed to be firmly anchored to the bottom by her starboard propeller. Most of her crew boarded Staff and those remaining on Glennon lightened her stern by Pumping fuel forward and jettisoning depth charges and topside gear. On 9 June salvage equipment was assembled and some 60 officers and men of the Glennon came back on board. The following morning, just as Comdr. Johnson was preparing to resume efforts to save his ship, a German battery near Quinneville found her range. A second salvo hit Glennon amidships and cut off all power. After a third hit, Commander Johnson ordered abandon ship and the men were taken off in a landing craft. Glennon floated until 2145, 10 June 1944, then rolled over and sank. She suffered 25 lost and 38 wounded.


Wreck of USS Glennon (DD-620)

Laid down in March 1942 and the Federal Kearny Yard and commissioned into US Navy service in October of the same year, USS Glennon was the 44th member of the Gleaves Class of Destroyers and after shakedown and crew training joined the US Atlantic Fleet in the fight against the Axis in Europe.

Assigned primarily to convoy escort work, the Glennon and her crew operated off the US & Canadian coast through early 1943 before crossing the Atlantic screening troop and supply ships bound for the Allied Invasion of Sicily. Providing both gunfire support and anti-submarine screening during the landings at Licata and Gela in July 1943, the Glennon withdrew from Italian waters with empty troopships to Oran where she continued her convoy escort operations along the North African coast through the end of 1943.

Returning to New York in December 1943, the Glennon underwent a refit and upgrade period at the New York Navy yard before commencing transatlantic convoy escort work from the US to the UK. After completing two round trips to the British Isles during the notoriously bad North Atlantic Winter, Glennon stood out of New York for Gibraltar in April escorting a fast tanker convoy bound for the Mediterranean, arriving at the British port on the 22nd. Expecting to be assigned to another convoy, Glennon and her crew instead received orders to sail for Belfast with a Naval Task Group, part of the Allied build-up for the upcoming Invasion of France. Arriving in Northern Ireland on May 14th, the Glennon began intensive training maneuvers in preparation for her role in 'Operation Overlord', and by June 1st she and her crew were anchored in Plymouth roads with the other ships of Assault Force "U", awaiting orders to sail for the beaches of Normandy.

Screening the Capital ships of the Force "U" bombardment force across the English Channel during the night of June 5th, the Glennon arrived off Normandy before dawn on June 6th, 1944 and took up her position off Baie de la Seine to guard for German E-Boats, Submarines or other surface craft which could pose a threat to the Battleships, Cruisers and Destroyers that began shelling German positions at first light. As the invasion progressed throughout the day, it became clear that no German surface craft were operating in the area so Glennon closed on the Utah Beachhead and began on-call fire support for US and Allied troops fighting to advance inland. Continuing this work through the night of June 6th and into June 7th, Glennon sent over a thousand 5-inch shells onto German positions, 430 of which severely battered the area around Quinéville and facilitated the capture of the town.

Moving Northwest to a new fire support position off the Îles Saint-Marcouf on the morning of June 8th, the Glennon was rocked by a German mine which was set off beneath her Port Stern at 0830hrs. The force of the underwater blast all but ripped the aft most section of the Glennon forward of her #3 5-inch mount off the ship, but a ribbon of hull plating remained firmly attached to the Stern as it quickly flooded and sank, taking most of the men stationed therein with it to the bottom and dragging Glennon lower into the water. Having lost both her propellers Glennon went dead in the water as her crew effected enough damage control to keep the bow section of the ship afloat, and within moments two Minesweepers were onscene and the Destroyer Escort USS Rich (DE-695) had taken up a screening position on the Glennon to protect the rescue and salvage effort. The Minesweeper USS Staff (AM-114) had no sooner put a line aboard the Glennon and began to tow the wounded Destroyer away from the shoreline than the USS Rich was rocked by three near-simultaneous blasts from German mines and sank in three pieces within fifteen minutes. All of the assembled ships and the destruction of the Rich attracted the attention of German shore batteries, and within minutes the entire formation was under increasingly accurate fire, prompting the salvage operation to be called off and the Glennon to be abandoned.

Remaining defiantly afloat through the day and into the night of June 8th, the Glennon was re-boarded by a volunteer crew under the cover of darkness and a concerted attempt was made to separate the ship from her sunken Stern section, which was firmly wedged into rocks on the bottom and preventing the Glennon from being towed out of the range of German artillery. Efforts by the 60-man crew continued through the night and into the morning of June 9th, when the increased activity around the Glennon again prompted German batteries to start shelling the immobile vessel, hitting her several times with 8-inch and 6-inch rounds amidships which cut all power onboard. With the ship now powerless and beginning to flood, Glennon's Captain ordered her abandoned once again shortly after 0700hrs on June 9th. Under periodic fire throughout June 9th and into June 10th, the Glennon settled lower and lower into the water before she finally succumbed to her wounds and sank at this location at 2145hrs on June 10th, 1944, having lost 25 of her crew.

For her actions during the Second World War, USS Glennon received two Battle Stars.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

1945� [ edit | edit source ]

After shakedown off Cuba, Glennon sailed from Boston, Massachusetts on 12 February 1946 for Europe and visited many of the nations washed by the North Sea before returning to New York in August of the same year. Undergoing upkeep at Boston and overhaul at Newport, Rhode Island, Glennon conducted refresher training out of Guantanamo Bay during April and May 1947. For the next 12 months she engaged in a rigorous schedule of tactics along the New England coast and down the eastern seaboard to ports of Florida. In February and March 1948 she took part in combat fleet exercises and maneuvers in waters ranging from Cuba to Trinidad and the Panama Canal.

Sailing from Norfolk, Virginia in June 1948, Glennon served with the Midshipman Practice Squadron and made calls at Portugal, Italy, and French Morocco. She joined the 6th Fleet in August 1948 for Mediterranean duty, returning stateside in January 1949 for overhaul at Boston. In the winter of 1949–50 she was part of "Operation Frostbite", a cold weather exercise near the Davis Strait, subsequently to sail from Newport on 4 January 1950 for another "Med" cruise.

Upon return to the United States, she made a series of reserve training cruises along the eastern, seaboard and engaged in type training along the New England coast and into the Caribbean Sea. Underway from Newport on 8 January 1951, she embarked on another "Med" cruise, returning to Boston in May for overhaul followed by refresher training out of Cuba.

1952� [ edit | edit source ]

Glennon spent January and February 1952 with a carrier task force conducting cold weather training in waters ranging northward to the Davis Straits. From April to October she was flagship of Destroyer Squadronو (DesRonو), and stood out in June for the Mediterranean, returning to Annapolis, Maryland in September 1952. In July and August of 1952 'Glennon' was part of a Task Group with the flagship New Jersey which conducted Midshipman training on a six week cruise. The Task Group shipped out of Newport News, VA with ports of call at Cherbourg, Lisbon, and Guantanamo. For more than a decade the destroyer continued her already established peacetime operation pattern. Highlights of this exacting duty included participation as a recovery station ship in the 1961 and 1962 Project Mercury flights, and in the search for the lost nuclear powered submarine Thresher (SSN-593). In August 1961 Glennon was called away suddenly to join the task force for the Project Mercury space shot carrying Major Gus Grissom. In early 1962 she was again chosen to man an Atlantic recovery station for the historic three-orbit flight of Major John Glenn.

An extensive overhaul at Boston terminated on 24 July 1963, and through the remainder of that year Glennon trained in the Caribbean, acted as school ship for the Anti-submarine Warfare School at Key West, Florida, and put in at Boston in November for refitting. The years 1964 and 1965 found Glennon continuing her ASW work. In September 1964 she was chosen to carry guests to the America's Cup Races. Later in May 1965 she conducted exercises called "Mule㻁" in which United States Army cadets from West Point were given shipboard indoctrination. Through 1967 Glennon continued to operate with the United States Atlantic Fleet.

1967� [ edit | edit source ]

Glennon was called to serve with TF77 as a Naval Gunfire Support Unit off Viet Nam in 1972. She made a 72 hour notice emergency deployment from Charleston South Carolina through the Panama Canal. She supported many operations and answered many calls for fire in South Viet Nam and around the DMZ. She also supported operations off North Viet Nam, and was involved in several fire fights with shore batteries. Her Officers and crew wear the Combat Action Ribbon, multiple awards. Glennon was decommissioned and struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 October 1976. She was sunk as a target off Puerto Rico on 26 February 1981.


Mục lục

Glennon được chế tạo tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey. Nó được đặt lườn vào ngày 25 tháng 3 năm 1942 được hạ thủy vào ngày 26 tháng 8 năm 1942, và được đỡ đầu bởi cô Jeanne Lejeune Glennon, cháu đô đốc Glennon. Con tàu được cho nhập biên chế cùng Hải quân Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 8 tháng 10 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Thiếu tá Hải quân Floyd C. Camp.

Sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy huấn luyện dọc theo bờ biển New England, Glennon hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải chuyên chở binh lính và tiếp liệu cho Trận đổ bộ Gela từ ngày đến ngày 9 đến ngày 15 tháng 7 năm 1943. Nó quay trở về New York vào ngày 3 tháng 12, rồi thực hiện hai chuyến đi khứ hồi hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi sang quần đảo Anh cùng một chuyến đi sang Gibraltar. Nó quay trở về New York từ Gibraltar vào ngày 22 tháng 4 năm 1944, rồi khởi hành từ cảng này vào ngày 5 tháng 5 cùng một đội đặc nhiệm, đi đến Belfast, Bắc Ireland vào ngày 14 tháng 5 để chuẩn bị tham gia Chiến dịch Overlord, cuộc Đổ bộ Normandy. Được phân về Lực lượng Tấn công lên bãi Utah thuộc Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm Hải quân phía Tây, nó đi đến Baie de la Seine, Pháp vào ngày 6 tháng 6. Sau khi tuần tra chung quanh đội bắn phá phòng ngừa tàu ngầm và tàu phóng lôi E-boat của Hải quân Đức can thiệp, nó tham gia bắn phá hỗ trợ cho binh lính đổ bộ trên bờ.

Vào ngày 7 tháng 6, Glennon đã bắn 430 quả đạn pháo 5 in (130 mm)/38 caliber lên bờ hỗ trợ cho cuộc tiến quân lên phía Bắc về hướng Quinéville. Dưới quyền chỉ huy của Trung tá Hải quân Clifford A. Johnson, nó lại tiếp cận nơi trực chiến hỗ trợ hỏa lực lúc 08 giờ 30 phút ngày 8 tháng 6, khi đuôi tàu trúng phải một quả mìn. Một chiếc xuồng được thả để cứu vớt những người sống sót trong khi các tàu quét mìn StaffThreat đi đến hiện trường một chiếc nối một sợi cáp để kéo trong khi chiếc kia quét mìn phía trước chiếc tàu khu trục bị hư hại. Tàu khu trục hộ tống Rich cũng tiếp cận để trợ giúp, nhưng chịu đựng một vụ nổ lớn khi nó vòng quanh đuôi của Glennon để rời khu vực. Vài phút sau, một vụ nổ thứ hai làm nổ tung 50 ft (15 m) phần đuôi của Rich, tiếp nối bởi một vụ nổ thứ ba bên dưới sàn trước con tàu. Rich đắm chỉ trong vòng 15 phút sau vụ nổ thứ nhất.

Tàu quét mìn Staff phát hiện nó không thể kéo Glennon, do phần đuôi tàu bị mắc cạn bởi chân vịt bên mạn phải bị hư hại. Phần lớn thủy thủ đoàn của Staff và những người còn lại của Glennon nỗ lực làm nhẹ phần đuôi tàu bằng cách bơm nhiên liệu đến các ngăn phía trước và phóng bỏ những vật nặng như mìn sâu. Sang ngày 9 tháng 6, thiết bị cứu hộ được tập trung, và khoảng 60 sĩ quan và thủy thủ của Glennon quay trở lại tàu. Sáng hôm sau, khi Trung tá Johnson chuẩn bị tiếp nối các nỗ lực để cứu con tàu của mình, một khẩu đội pháo bờ biển Đức gần Quinéville bắt được con tàu trong tầm bắn. Loạt đạn pháo thứ hai bắn trúng Glennon giữa tàu và làm mất điện toàn bộ. Sau cú bắn trúng thứ ba, Trung tá Johnson ra lệnh cho thủy thủ đoàn bỏ tàu, và họ rời đi trên những xuồng đổ bộ. Glennon tiếp tục nổi cho đến 21 giờ 45 phút ngày 10 tháng 6 năm 1944, khi nó lật úp và đắm. Con tàu chịu đựng 25 người tử trận và 38 người bị thương.

Glennon được tặng thưởng hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Retired Navy Captain Tells Father's Stories of D-Day

From Retired Stories of My Dad, CAPT John B. Ferriter, US Navy by Capt. Edward C. (Ted) Ferriter, USN (Ret.)

Cmdr. Charles E. Robison, USN, Retired, made an hour long video record of the two-year life of the USS Glennon, DD-620. The video was made in May 1990, almost fifty years after the sinking of the ship. Cmdr. Robison took the pictures as an Ensign from 1942 to 1944, with his new &ldquohigh technology&rdquo, wind-up camera. It is an amazing story, especially for those relatives of the Glennon&rsquos crew. There are pictures of my Dad, then Lt. Cmdr. John Ferriter, that I had never seen before: playing softball, standing watch, and leading the evacuation of the sinking ship. The video includes histories of ports of call, descriptions of action against the enemy, and the final dispersion of the surviving crew. This record follows the narration of Cmdr. Robison&rsquos video.

The USS Glennon was launched August 18, 1942 in Carney, NJ. It was then towed to Brooklyn for outfitting. Even before its final Shakedown Cruise, the Glennon was assigned to escort a convoy to Galveston, TX in September of 1942. There are pictures of my Dad, the XO, playing softball in Texas with the crew, getting a few hits and running bases. CDR Robison said, &ldquoThere&rsquos Johnny Ferriter,&rdquo with just a bit of admiration and camaraderie in his voice.

After the Shakedown Cruise, the ship sailed for Casa Blanca, Morocco, and Dakar, Capital of French West Africa. The squadron was sent to Dakar to monitor a group of five French Navy ships that had escaped capture by the Germans. Those French ships never moved. Later, in the spring of 1943, the Glennon was part of an enormous convoy of troop transports heading to Sicily. Cmdr. Robison describes the formation of over a hundred ships and the destroyer&rsquos role escorting the formation. There is footage of Dad with the control of the ship during a difficult maneuver alongside to transfer material from one ship to the other.

In the summer of 1943 the squadron, along with hundreds of other ships, staged in Algiers and prepared for the invasion of Sicily. They provided shore bombardment off the town of Gala, Sicily. A sister ship, the USS Maddox, operating 4 or 5 miles west of the Glennon, just disappeared. Nothing of the ship was recovered. It was suspected the ship hit a mine.

At Normandy, in June 1944, the squadron was assigned a naval gunfire support area two miles from the UTAH Beach landing site. Cmdr. Robison said, &ldquoThere were mines going off all over the place.&rdquo At 4:00 a.m. on D+1 the Glennon hit a mine. The USS Rich came in to assist and take on casualties. The skipper of the Glennon told the Rich his ship was not in danger of sinking and they should stand off and watch out for mines. Almost immediately the USS Rich hit a mine, breaking the ship in two. The forward half then hit another mine. A third mine sent the Rich to the bottom. There were very few survivors.

The Glennon was now &ldquoanchored&rdquo by its stern in relatively shallow water, approximately 30 feet deep. The Commanding Officer&rsquos, record of the event notes: &ldquoThe USS Glennon had been grounded astern by a German mine detonating under the port quarter partially breaking the after section off.&rdquo According to the Commanding Officer, Dad remained on board with a small crew of &ldquoone other officer and eight men to maintain power to keep pumps in operation which would prevent further flooding and possible sinking of the ship.&rdquo The Glennon&rsquos stern remained attached to the forward part of the ship by the propeller shaft. Attempts to cut the forward part of the ship free were made, however no divers could enter the water because concussions from nearby exploding mines would kill them. Cmdr. Robison, mentioned that on D+2 or 3 the Germans found their range and the ship began to take heavy damage. The Commanding Officer's record continued: &ldquoThe ship was within range of German batteries located at Quineville, France, which had previously shelled the ship.&rdquo Nearby PT boats laid down smoke for concealment, and Allied aircraft attempted to suppress German gunfire.

Cmdr. Robison had many pictures of the damaged Glennon and the crew working feverishly to save her. Finally, an order from higher authority came to abandon ship. The last two members of the crew to leave the ship were Dad and the skipper. After boarding the ship&rsquos motor whaleboat, the remaining crew took a final turn around the Glennon for one last look at the ship that had been home for two years. The crew was ordered to a nearby LST taking wounded and other survivors back to England.

The crew of the Glennon later moved to Scotland to await orders to other ships or commands needed by the Navy. Most of the crew returned to the US via the Queen Elizabeth (I), transiting the Atlantic at 30 knots with no escort. CDR Robison reported to the USS Owen in the Pacific, Dad reported to the USS Knight (DD-633) as Commanding Officer.

In every port the ship visited, Ensign Robison took pictures of the Glennon&rsquos crew on liberty and scenes of the ports: charcoal burners mounted on cars and buses in Africa that used carbon monoxide for power native women thrashing grain with long poles in Dakar sailors on horseback in Bermuda US Navy PBYs at anchor in Gibraltar liberty parties in Algiers. Later, when assigned to a different ship in the Pacific, Ensign Robison took pictures of officers and crew of the USS Owen walking through Hiroshima and Nagasaki a scant month after the bombing.

The basic make up of a squadron of destroyers, then and today, consists of eight ships, the specific size of the squadron depending on the mission tasked and the availability of resources. Cmdr. Robison never mentions the actual name/number of the squadron (such as Dad&rsquos DESRON 20) just that there were eight ships in the squadron, and he listed their names. To me the single most surprising part of the entire narration is that six of the eight ships originally assigned to the squadron were either sunk or heavily damaged during the war. Five ships were lost in combat. This is an indication of the constant danger these small but powerful, fast and deadly ships faced throughout WWII.

Those six destroyers were:

  • USS Maddox &ndash Lost at sea during the invasion of Sicily
  • USS Murphy &ndash Cut in two by a large transport ship during convoy operations, returned to service after extensive repairs
  • USS Nelson &ndash Hit by a U-Boat, out of action for the Normandy invasion
  • USS Rich &ndash Hit three mines at Normandy, broke apart and sank
  • USS Corry &ndash Sank at Normandy,
  • USS Glennon &ndash Sank at Normandy.

Cmdr. Robison visited Normandy in 1987 and found memorial plaques to each of the three destroyers from the squadron that sank off UTAH Beach in June 1944: USS Glennon, USS Rich, and USS Corry.

Capt. Ted Ferriter, USN (Ret) served over 30 years in Naval Aviation, primarily in the P-3/Maritime Patrol community. He is retired and lives in rural Virginia.


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Product Description

USS Glennon DD 620

"Personalized" Canvas Ship Print

(Not just a photo or poster but a work of art!)

Every sailor loved his ship. It was his life. Where he had tremendous responsibility and lived with his closest shipmates. As one gets older his appreciation for the ship and the Navy experience gets stronger. A personalized print shows ownership, accomplishment and an emotion that never goes away. It helps to show your pride even if a loved one is no longer with you. Every time you walk by the print you will feel the person or the Navy experience in your heart (guaranteed).

The image is portrayed on the waters of the ocean or bay with a display of her crest if available. The ships name is printed on the bottom of the print. What a great canvas print to commemorate yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her.

The printed picture is exactly as you see it. The canvas size is 8"x10" ready for framing as it is or you can add an additional matte of your own choosing. If you would like a larger picture size (11"x 14") on a 13" X 19" canvas simply purchase this print then prior to payment purchase additional services located in the store category (Home) to the left of this page. This option is an additional $12.00. The prints are made to order. They look awesome when matted and framed.

We PERSONALIZE the print with "Name, Rank and/or Years Served" or anything else you would like it to state (NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE). It is placed just above the ships photo. After purchasing the print simply email us or indicate in the notes section of your payment what you would like printed on it. Example:

United States Navy Sailor
YOUR NAME HERE
Proudly Served Sept 1963 - Sept 1967

This would make a nice gift and a great addition to any historic military collection. Would be fantastic for decorating the home or office wall.

The watermark "Great Naval Images" will NOT be on your print.

This photo is printed on Archival-Safe Acid-Free canvas using a high resolution printer and should last many years.

Because of its unique natural woven texture canvas offers a special and distinctive look that can only be captured on canvas. The canvas print does not need glass thereby enhancing the appearance of your print, eliminating glare and reducing your overall cost.

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USS Glennon DD620 - History

 Navy officer and electrical engineer of East Providence, RI

 Personal papers, 1935-2003 (bulk 1935-1956)

 Processed by: Karen Eberhart, January 2004

©Rhode Island Historical Society

             Gustavus Reed Ide, Jr. was born in East Providence, RI on February 28, 1919 the son of Gustavus Reed Ide and Florence. He was an avid baseball and tennis player participating in the amateur baseball league and a member of the tennis team in college. He graduated from East Providence High School in 1935 and then attended Rhode Island State College (University of Rhode Island), graduating in June 1940 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. During the summer of 1937 he began his working life as a cashier at the Narragansett Race Track selling and cashing racing tickets. The next two summers he worked on a surveying crew for the Waterman Engineering Company during 1938 and for the Rhode Island State Board of Public Roads in 1939 . After he graduated from college he was a student engineer in training with the New England Power Association during Aug 1940 to April 1942 learning how to lay out and service electric power lines.

             Gustavus joined the Navy Reserve in March 1942 and was sent to the Naval Training School (Indoctrination) at Notre Dame University in Notre Dame, IN for a six week program. His class was trained specifically for shore duty and so did not endure the regular three month "boot camp." Gustavus was then sent to torpedo school in Newport, RI to learn how to supply torpedoes to the troops. Because of the shortage of naval officers, Gustavus was instead called up for active duty aboard a brand new destroyer, the USS Glennon (DD620). So, in October of 1942, he went to sea as the Torpedo Officer without any training or even basic sea knowledge such as which side of the boat was starboard. He learned quickly and was one of the officers selected to serve watches as Officer of the Deck during the invasion of Utah Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The stern of the USS Glennon hit a mine on June 8 but remained afloat until June 10 when it was sunk by enemy fire.

             Gustavus returned unharmed to the United States and was sent to Washington, D.C. for a three month Gunnery and Ordnance School during September - November, 1944. He then became the Gunnery Officer on the destroyer USS Mervine (DD489) which was recommissioned as a destroyer mine sweeper (DMS31) in early 1945. Gustavus was released from active duty in March 1946 and he returned to his original career path as an electrical engineer. He worked for the Central Massachusetts Electric Company in Palmer, MA as a Distribution Engineer starting in April 1947. That public utility then became the Worcester County Electric Company. Gustavus was married with one child by June 1949 and his second child was born in 1951 or 1952. He and his family lived in Warren, MA for many years and he currently resides in Westborough, MA.

             This collection consists primarily of information on the naval career of Gustavus Ide during World War II. He served aboard destroyers for nearly his entire period of service. The materials include a scrapbook/diary with detailed information on his experiences in the navy, the rescue of Third Mate William J. Lemmerman after he fell overboard in the North Atlantic in November 1943 and the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. The collection also includes detailed information about the ships on which he served. A second scrapbook contains newspaper clippings from his college years playing baseball and tennis, 1935-1940. The scrapbook has detailed information about the Melrose League for amateur baseball teams in Rhode Island.

B.1, F.1       Educational diplomas and documents, 1935-1940

B.1, F.2-8   Military orders and documents, 1942-1947, 1956, 2000-2002

B.1, F.9       Newspaper clippings, 1944, 1993

B.1, F.10     Officer service record, 1942-1955

B.1, F.11     Reminiscences of navy training and career, undated typescript, 2003

B.1, F.12     Scrapbook - baseball and tennis, c.1935-1940

B.1, F.13     Wilde, E. Andrew, Jr., editor. The U.S.S. Glennon (DD-620) in World War II : Documents and Photographs. Needham, MA, 1999, revised 2001

B.1, F.14    USS Glennon - ship's newspaper, 1942-1944

B.1, F.15     USS Mervine - ship's newspaper, 1945

B.1, F.16     USS Nelson - ship's newspaper, 1943

B.2, V.1      Scrapbook - military service, 1942-2003


Watch the video: USS Glennon DD-620 hits mine on June 8, 1944 during Invasion of Normandy; German shore battery hits.