Sarasota APA-204 - History

Sarasota APA-204 - History

Sarasota
(APA-204: dp. 6,873 (It.); 1. 455'; b. 62'; dr. 28'1"; s. 17 k., cpl. 536, trp. 1,561, a. 1 5", 12 40mm., 10 20mm.; cl. Haskell; T. VC2-S-AP5)

Sarasota (APA-204) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract (MCV hull 552) on 11 April 1944 by the Permanente Metals Corp., Richmond, Calif.; launched on 14 June 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Clayton L. Shaff; acquired by the Navy on 16 August 1944 and commissioned the same day, Comdr. James I. MacPherson, USNR, in command.

Following shakedown, Sarasota embarked Naval Construction Battalion units and departed California on 21 October. On 9 November, she arrived in Seeadler Harbor, Manus. The next day, Mount Hood (AE-11) carrying approximately 3,800 tons of ordnance material, exploded, causing damage to ships and men within 2,000 yards. Immediately afterward, Sarasota's small boats carried first aid parties to stricken ships arid craft, and her sick bay took in more seriously wounded personnel for emergency treatment.

Two days later, the APA steamed to Hollandia and during the next week, transported troops and equipment to Biak, Mios Woendi, and Milne Bay-then returned to Manus. On the 27th, she sailed again, and after calling at Finschhafen, put into Empress Augusta Bay, Bougainville, to load units of the 2d Battalion, 129th Regimental Combat Team, 37th Infantry Division. Landing exercises at Lae followed; and, on 21 December, she returned to Manus to stage for the invasion of Luzon.

As flagship of Transport Division 8, Sarasota got underway with TU 79.3.3 on the 31st. On 8 January 1945, having survived Japanese suicide attacks, she approached her destination. On the 9th, she rode in Lingayen Gulf as her boats took the troops into "Crimson Beach" near the town of Lingayen.

After the landings, Sarasota steamed to Leyte transferred casualties she had received from the beaches of Lingayen Gulf; and, on the 21st, loaded troops of the 34th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, in preparation for operation "Mike VII," the landing in Zambales Province, Luzon.

On 26 January, Sarasota again sailed north. Three days later, she landed the assault troops on "Blue Beach," west of San Antonio, then departed the area. Returning to Leyte, she remained through February. In March, she embarked men and equipment of the 2d Battalion, 381st Regiment, 96th Infantry Division; conducted training operations, and, on the 27th steamed from Philippine waters.

On 1 April, she stood off the Hagushi beaches of Okinawa as her LCMs and DUKWs landed the troops on the "White Beaches." Their equipment followed

and, by the 4th, Sarasota had completed offloading. She then shifted to Kerama Retto, assisted in offloading the damaged Henrico and prepared for the assault on le Shima. On the i6th, she landed units of the 305th Regimental Combat Team on that island off the Motobu Peninsula. Three days later, she returned to the Hagushi anchorage and, on the 22d, departed the Ryukyus for the Marianas.

At the end of April, Sarasota disembarked Okinawa casualties at Saipan. On 2 May, she sailed for the Solomons, whence she carried general cargo, Marines Army hospitalmen, and Navy passengers to Guam. From there, she transported casualties to Pearl Harbor; then continued on to San Francisco. After availability at Seattle she embarked Army troops and, on 18 July, again headed for Okinawa.

She arrived in the Hagushi anchorage on 12 August and began disembarking her reinforcement troops and, offloading her cargo. Three days later, hostilities ceased. On the 29th, the APA shifted to Naha to load her first contingent of occupation troops, units of the X l V Corps. On 8 September, she disembarked those troops at Jinsen, Korea. On the 14th, she returned to Okinawa, whence on 1 October she delivered marines to Chinwangtao. Following offloading, she assumed station ship duties in the Tientsin-Taku area; and, at the end of November, she was reassigned to transport duties, this time with the "Magic Carpet" fleet to carry servicemen back to the United States.

Sailing to Sasebo in early December, she embarked units of the 5th Marine Division and got underway for San Diego, arriving on the 24th. Between 9 January and 19 February 1946, she completed a second "Magic Carpet" run; then, prepared for inactivation. In early March, she moved to San Francisco for overhaul; and in June, she was towed to Stockton, where she was decommissioned on 1 August and berthed with the 19th ( Inactive ) Fleet.

Four years later, Sarasota was ordered activated. Recommissioned on 3 February 1951, she conducted training operations and underwent alterations into June. On the 20th, she sailed for Panama; and, on 13 July, she arrived at Norfolk, her new home port. For the remainder of 1951, the APA trained Marine Corps units in exercises off the east coast and in the Caribbean. With the new year, 1952, however, she sailed east, with units of the 8th Marines embarked, and for the next three and one-half months operated in the Mediterranean as a unit of the 6th Fleet. Relieved on 8 May, she returned to the United States and resumed amphibious training exercises off the east coast. From May to October 1954, she again deployed to the Mediterranean. That 6th Fleet tour was again followed by training exercises, including midshipman and reservist cruises; and, in April 1955, she arrived at Charleston to again commence inactivation.

Decommissioned on 2 September 1955, she remained in reserve until transferred to the Maritime Administration in June 1966. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 July. Since then, into 1974, Sarasota has remained in the custody of the Maritime Administration, berthed in the James River as a unit of the National Defense Reserve Fleet.

Sarasota earned 3 battle stars during World War II.


REAL HISTORY: Jeff LaHurd: Tracing Sarasota's history with voices from the past

The Egyptians believe that you die twice. Once when your final breath is taken, and again the last time someone speaks your name.

I think of that when I read, write or lecture about Sarasota&rsquos citizens who are no longer with us. In that light, I thought it would be of interest to trace some of our history through their quotes, to let them speak for themselves long after they died. For those whom I could not find a quote, I used one by those who knew them.

When the failed Scot Colony steamed into Sarasota Bay in December of 1885, a look at the shoreline from the deck was all it took for them to realize the horrid truth &mdash they had been duped. The &ldquoLittle Scotland&rdquo they were promised by salesmen was a wilderness that they were ill prepared to cope with. Alex Browning, a youngster when the Colony came ashore put it best: &ldquoOf course there was much discontent, being dumped like this, in a wild country without houses to live in, tired and hungry, one can imagine what it was like.&rdquo

In the summer of 1886, Anton Kleinoscheg who arrived ahead of the Colony wrote to a friend of the angst engendered by mosquitoes: &ldquoI look with rather unfriendly eyes at the clouded sky which constantly sends down the water masses that stand in ponds and depressions and generate millions of these beasts. They have killed two of my dogs (a horrible end). When I work . I fall a victim to their bloodthirstiness, and I think no girl can await her sweetheart with so much longing as I am awaiting the end of the rainy season.&rdquo

Most of the disillusioned colonists departed after a few months. Shortly before leaving, Dan McKinlay cited some of the hardships: &ldquoProspects here are so bad . in fact as far as we can see it means starvation if we stay . again, prairie fires some distance from us . high wind blowing and some rain . the colony seems to have completely broken up.&rdquo

Ben Stickney, loved throughout Sarasota as Uncle Ben, the gentlemen for whom the Stickney Point Bridge and Stickney Point Road are named, threw beach picnics for the locals and welcomed one and all. Rose Wilson, The Sarasota Times publisher wrote of him: &ldquoHe was cultivated in much and of good blood and breeding. He was a friend to all and a foe to none. His nature was transparent . his spirit genial, his hands open, and his heart kind.&rdquo

Chicago Society queen Bertha Palmer arrived in 1910. Of her business acumen, The Sarasota Times enthused: &ldquoWith a foresight equal to that one might expect from the shrewdest financier of modern times, Mrs. Potter Palmer has just closed a deal that gives her complete control of Florida&rsquos richest virgin soil.&rdquo Putting her achievement in perspective the paper went on: &ldquoMrs. Palmer demonstrated shrewdness in handling business that some of our Napoleons of finance might adopt and at the same time improve their financial standing.&rdquo

When Davie Lindsay Worcester took a launch to Bird Key, still a small uninhabited island, she was awed by its tropical beauty and wrote to her husband, Thomas: &ldquoThis is what I want for my old age &mldr Oh! Words cannot paint the scene &mdash imagination cannot conceive of such grandeur.&rdquo He and Davie bought the island and built her dream home. Unfortunately, she died before the home was completed. Of the mansion, known as New Edzell Castle after Davie&rsquos ancestral home in Scotland, The Sarasota Times reported: &ldquoAll the guests were frankly and even loudly outspoken in exclamations of delight and sincere admiration.&rdquo

When the 1920s real estate boom hit, long time resident and Sarasota attorney, Lamar Dozier recalled, &ldquoSarasota was electric with excitement.&rdquo

A.B. Edwards, the city of Sarasota&rsquos first mayor remarked: &ldquoIt would have taken 100 years for the average city to acquire what Sarasota did in that boom period.&rdquo

On the downside, real estate man Roger Flory recalled that some of the developers were just out for a fast buck: &ldquoSome of the subdivisions were underwater some had an underlying hardpan while others were too far removed from the center of activity to warrant their existence.&rdquo

After the bust, real estate men whom Edwards said, &ldquoWere sleeping in cars, on benches, and at the train station, left as quickly as they arrived. The water had been squeezed out of the sponge.&rdquo

Spring Training has been popular in Sarasota since the mighty John J. McGraw brought the powerhouse New York Giants to Sarasota in 1924. All of baseball&rsquos greats played here. Giants slugger Rogers Hornsby was asked why he did not play golf. &ldquoWhen I hit a ball, I want someone else to chase it,&rdquo he replied.

The Boston Red Sox trained here from 1933 until they unexpectedly left town in 1958. Their first baseman Jimmy Foxx, who was so strong it was said even his hair had muscles, was nicknamed the Beast. When asked how to pitch to him, one hurler replied. &ldquoI&rsquod rather not throw the ball at all.&rdquo

Baseball manager Bill Veeck, the colorful &ldquoBarnum of Baseball&rdquo who was in charge of the Chicago White Sox when they trained here in 1960 remarked, &ldquoThe most beautiful thing in the world is a ballpark filled with people.&rdquo White Sox pitcher Early Wynn, well known for brushing batters away from the plate with an inside fastball, was asked if he would bean his mother. &ldquoOnly if she was digging in,&rdquo he shot back. Another time he said on the same subject: &ldquoIt would depend on how well she was hitting.&rdquo Of Wynn, it was said, &ldquoThat SOB was so mean he would knock you down in the dugout.&rdquo

Professor Ellis Freeman who built the Four Seasons Apartments wrote of Sarasota&rsquos appeal in 1950: &ldquoThe town had the tone and charm of a fishing village . Artists and writers and professors like myself loved it for the complete absence of resort commercialism. It was what one hoped to find on Cape Cod and never did.&rdquo

Sarasota&rsquos great architect Tim Seibert waxed sentimental about Sarasota and his involvement in its changes over the years: When asked about Longboat Key, he said, &ldquoIt was a beautiful piece of nature in the 1940s. I always thought of it as a wild tropical Island. Now I&rsquom playing a considerable role in its development, and, yes that gives me a lot to think about. I honestly don&rsquot know what I would do if I could turn back the hands of time on Longboat.&rdquo

Of the re-routing of US 41 along the downtown bayfront at the end of the 1950s, Architectural Forum editor Douglass Haskell was not pleased: &ldquoIts murder . I shout outrage . it&rsquos a filthy, dirty crime. It&rsquos unforgivable and idiotic, cutting off the community from where five years ago people could go to the pier and enjoy fishing and the bay.&rdquo

The News writer, Betty Burkett expressed the same sentiment with an economy of words: &ldquoA deed so ugly it will remain like a welt across the minds of our people for decades to come.&rdquo

During the movement to integrate Sarasota, African American activist Gene Carnegie staged a sit-in at the Woolworth lunch counter. He told a local reporter, &ldquoI could have easily brought 40 people in here and another 200 outside picketing. But that would incite trouble and would not be in the best interests of the community.&rdquo

Some years later, Fredd Atkins Sarasota&rsquos African American city commissioner and a former mayor spoke to Herald Tribune writer, Barbara Peters Smith about the segregated Lido Casino: &ldquoI can&rsquot tell you much about the Lido Casino because when I was a boy we were never allowed to go there. So I don&rsquot miss it at all. I didn&rsquot even know it was beautiful.&rdquo

Ken Thompson, Sarasota&rsquos 35-year city manager, integrated the library and the municipal golf course on his authority. Having done so, Karl Bickel, the retired UPI chief wrote to him, &ldquoYour statesmanship and far vision handling of the recent situation at the golf course was so sound and constructive that I am moved to express my personal admiration and thanks.&rdquo

Finally, wise words from John Hamilton Gillespie, the town of Sarasota&rsquos first mayor who was sent to revive the failed Scot Colony, &ldquoBe not too zealous to get rich, nor too easily tired of work, and follow a careful observance of the Golden Rule.&rdquo


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Product Description

USS Sarasota APA 204

May - October 1954 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Sarasota APA 204 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Norfolk, Morehead City, Algiers, Naples, Rome, Cagliari, Hyeres, Paris, Genoa, Riviera, Palma, Athens Greece, Izmir and Marseille France.
  • Change of Command Ceremony
  • Ships Party
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 228 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Attack Transport during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

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    APA citation style requires the use of DOI's (Digital Object Identifiers) if available for all resources that have originated online. You do not need the url if you have a DOI.

    Articles found in library databases or on the Web that were originally published online should include a DOI. Many databases will provide the DOI for you along with the rest of an article's citation information (title, author, etc.).

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    Have a DOI and need to find a document?

    Sarasota APA-204 - History

    May - October 1954 Cruise Book

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of naval history.

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Sarasota APA 204 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Ports of Call: Norfolk , Morehead City , Algiers , Naples , Rome , Cagliari , Hyeres , Paris , Genoa , Riviera , Palma , Athens Greece , Izmir and Marseille France .
    • Change of Command Ceremony
    • Ships Party
    • Divisional Group Photos with Names
    • Many Crew Activity Photos
    • Plus Much More

    Over 228 Photos on Approximately 63 Pages.

    Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Attack Transport during this time period.


    Sarasota APA-204 - History

    USS Pasadena , a 10,000-ton Cleveland class light cruiser, was built at Quincy, Massachusetts. Commissioned in June 1944, she went to the Pacific in the Fall of that year to join the war against Japan. From mid-November 1944 until the end of the fighting in August 1945, she escorted aircraft carriers as they hit targets in the Philippines area, the South China Sea, the Ryukyus and the Japanese Home Islands. In February-May 1945, Pasadena also provided gunfire support during the difficult campaigns to capture Iwo Jima and Okinawa. The cruiser was present in Tokyo Bay when Japan formally surrendered on 2 September.

    Pasadena remained in Japanese waters for the rest of 1945 and the first few weeks of 1946, supporting occupation activities. After overhaul on the U.S. West Coast, she served in the Eastern and Central Pacific for two years, taking part in training and readiness operations. The cruiser deployed to the Far East between October 1948 and May 1949, a period of rising tension as Communist forces neared the end of their long fight to control China. Pasadena completed her active service with local operations off the West Coast and began inactiviation preparations in September 1949. She was decommissioned at the Puget Sound Navy Yard in January 1950 to begin two decades in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. USS Pasadena was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in December 1970 and sold for scrapping in July 1972.

    This page features all the views we have related to USS Pasadena (CL-65).

    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

    Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

    Underway off Boston, Massachusetts, 21 July 1944.
    Photographed from a Squadron ZP-11 blimp. Position is 42 45'N, 70 50'W. Ship's course 110 degrees. Time 1400 hrs.
    Pasadena is painted in Camouflage Measure 32, Design 24d.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 60KB 740 x 610 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

    Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 2 May 1946.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 63KB 740 x 615 pixels

    Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 2 May 1946.
    Among the attack transports alongside the seawall at left are USS Shelburne (APA-205) and USS Sarasota (APA-204).

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 74KB 740 x 620 pixels

    Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 2 May 1946.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 66KB 740 x 620 pixels

    Entering Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, during a NROTC Midshipmen's cruise in the Summer of 1948.
    The photograph was released for publication on 9 August 1948.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 116KB 740 x 605 pixels

    View in the ship's Combat Information Center (CIC), 21 November 1944.
    Note aircraft status board in the center background.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 117KB 740 x 605 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

    Plan view, forward, taken at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 8 May 1946.
    Note crewmen working on the ship, and the many visible details of her structure, among them the two forward 6"/47 triple gun turrets and two of her six 5"/38 twin gun mounts.
    White outlines mark recent alterations to the ship.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 112KB 740 x 610 pixels

    Plan view, amidships, taken at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 8 May 1946.
    Note details of her structure, among them two 5"/38 twin gun mounts, twin and quadruple 40mm gun mounts, whaleboat and davits, and life rafts.
    The truck on shore is an International type, with Navy serial number 45742.
    White outlines mark recent alterations to the ship.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 130KB 740 x 610 pixels

    Plan view, aft, taken at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 8 May 1946.
    Note details of her structure, among them 6"/47 triple gun turrets, 5"/38 twin gun mounts, and Curtiss SC floatplanes on the catapults.
    White outlines mark recent alterations to the ship.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

    Online Image: 118KB 740 x 615 pixels

    Mrs. C.G. Wopschall christens the ship, during launching ceremonies at the Bethlehem Steel Company's Fore River shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, 28 December 1943.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 81KB 740 x 600 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

    Slides down the ways, during her launching at the Bethlehem Steel Company's Fore River shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, 28 December 1943.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 100KB 605 x 765 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

    Cartoon insignia, published in the ship's cruise book.
    The original volume is held by the Navy Department Library.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 121KB 740 x 550 pixels

    Additional view: Photo # 80-G-K-6523, a color photograph taken in Sagami Wan, Japan, circa 27-29 August 1945, shows USS Pasadena in the center distance of the image.

    In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Pasadena (CL-65). The following list features some of these images:

    The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
    DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

    Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


    FURTHER LEGISLATION: REDUCING REGULATION

    In the 1980s Congress decided that less regulation would "promote competitive and efficient transportation services" and "allow a variety of quality and price options to meet changing market demands." The Motor Carrier Act of 1980 significantly reduced the level of ICC regulation of the trucking industry, though it did not eliminate regulation entirely. Congress modified the public convenience and necessity standard so the ICC could no longer consider new entries undesirable simply because they might divert traffic or revenues away from existing companies. The 1980 act modified the distinction between common and contract carriers to foster competition between the two groups. Congress also gave individual motor carriers greater freedom to set rates in response to customer demand with less ICC involvement and banned rate bureaus from discussing rates applicable solely to individual companies. As a result, between 1980 and 1990, the number of trucking companies doubled.

    In 1982 Congress substantially reduced regulatory control of bus companies in the Bus Regulatory Reform Act. Despite this change in direction, financial hardships in the bus industry forced the ICC in 1988 to approve the absorption of the Trailways Bus Company by Greyhound, which became the only nationwide bus company. Nevertheless, most major cities and towns receive bus service from regional operators, mostly offering charter or tour service.

    Congress finally ended sixty years of motor carrier regulation with the ICC Termination Act of 1995. This act eliminated virtually all economic control of motor carriers and abolished the ICC. Most motor carriers need only register with the Department of Transportation and meet minimum financial, insurance, and safety requirements to exist today.

    See also: INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OF 1887.


    Sarasota APA-204 - History

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    Date Posted: 07:36:51 11/01/07 Thu
    Author: Bernadette Mary Mattas
    Subject: Re: This is the story of a Volga-German family named Krannawitter
    In reply to: Anton Hammersmith 's message, "Re: This is the story of a Volga-German family named Krannawitter" on 07:35:25 11/01/07 Thu


    Renowned as a market place with a continental flavor, it is a charming and graceful synthesis of past and present. Lush tropical plantings, courtyards and patios, antique statuary, and contemporary architectural design skillfully contribute to an international atmosphere of friendly warmth, enduring elegance, and timeless style. Relax in the restaurants, explore the shops – from trinkets to treasures, gourmet snacks to candlelight feasts, you’ll find it all on St. Armands Circle.

    Today, more than 130 stores on St. Armands Circle pamper customers from all areas of the United States and many foreign countries, but in the early 1900s, the key was just a mangrove island too far from the small fishing village of Sarasota to attract much attention.

    In 1893, Charles St. Amand, A Frenchman and first resident of the island, purchased for $21.71 three tracts of land totaling 131.89 acres. He homesteaded the land, fishing in the waters of the Gulf and Bay, and, along with other early pioneers, raised produce which he brought by boat to the market at City Pier in Sarasota. In later land deeds, his name was misspelled “St. Armand” and this spelling has persisted to the present day.

    Visionary circus magnate John Ringling purchased the St. Armands Key property in 1917 and planned a development that included residential lots and a shopping center laid out in a circle. As no bridge to the key had yet been built, Ringling engaged an old paddle-wheel steamboat, the “Success”, to serve as a workboat. His crews labored at dredging canals, building seawalls, and installing sidewalks and streets lined with rose-colored curbs. In 1925, work began on a causeway to join St. Armands Key to the mainland. Circus elephants were used to haul the huge timbers from which the bridge and causeway were built.

    One year later, amid much pomp and ceremony, both the John Ringling Causeway and Ringling Estates development opened to the public, with John Ringling himself leading a parade across the causeway and his Circus Band playing from a bandstand in the center of the Circle. Every hour there was free bus service from downtown to St. Armands for prospective buyers and sightseers.

    Property sales that the first day was estimated to exceed one million dollars but the boom ended quickly. As the nationwide depression worsened, land sales in Florida and on St. Armands stopped completely. In 1928, the City of Sarasota accepted as a gift the causeway which Ringling himself could no longer afford to maintain. Gradually, the wooden causeway began to rot, the Circle bandstand sagged, and the native vegetation covered the carefully planned streets and sidewalks.

    For nearly 20 years, St. Armands slept …. children played ball where the bandstand once stood and only curious tourists ventured out to view the once-famous key. During the 1940s, several courageous investors opened restaurants and a service station on the Circle but not until 1953 did business once again resume on St. Armands. By 1955 a number of stores had opened.

    John Ringling’s influence is still evident today in the planning and design of streets radiating from the circle at the island’s hub and the Italian statuary from his personal collection strategically placed around the key. This shopping circle looks very much as Ringling originally envisioned it, with the palm-lined medians, park-like setting, and tropical plantings he intended. Gone are the pioneer farms, vacant lots, and the bandshell featuring Sunday afternoon concerts.


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