The great parade of the Folies Bergère

The great parade of the Folies Bergère

  • Folies-Bergères - The elephant orchestra by Sam Lockart.

    ANONYMOUS

  • Folies-Bergères - The Trevally, acrobats.

    ANONYMOUS

  • Folies Bergères - Every evening Jack de Fer

    ANONYMOUS

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Title: Folies-Bergères - The elephant orchestra by Sam Lockart.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 120 - Width 84

Technique and other indications: Lithography

Storage location: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot website

Picture reference: 05-509288 / 55.46.76

Folies-Bergères - The elephant orchestra by Sam Lockart.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot

To close

Title: Folies-Bergères - The Trevally, acrobats.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 82.5 - Width 59

Technique and other indications: Lithography

Storage location: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot website

Picture reference: 05-509396 / 61.18.15E

Folies-Bergères - The Trevally, acrobats.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot

To close

Title: Folies Bergères - Every evening Jack de Fer

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 82.5 - Width 59.5

Technique and other indications: Lithography.

Storage location: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot website

Picture reference: 05-509337 / 69.6.17E

Folies Bergères - Every evening Jack de Fer

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - G. Blot

Publication date: October 2010

Historical context

The Folies-Bergère on the bill

In Paris, the end of the XIXe century is a period of artistic, cultural, economic and commercial flourishing which sees the emergence of new consumer goods and new types of leisure - or new ways of enjoying traditional leisure. A certain modernity then gained the practice and economy of entertainment, in close connection with the development of advertising.

This phenomenon is indeed accompanied by a whole "popular" advertising iconography. Located 32 rue Richer in the 9e arrondissement, the establishment quickly became one of the strongholds and one of the symbols of the party and the night specific to the new "Parisian life". In addition to magazines and music hall numbers, it also offers actual circus shows, such as those evoked by these prints.

Image Analysis

Colorful shows

The three posters Folies-Bergère - The elephant orchestra by Sam Lockart, Folies-Bergère - The Trevallys, acrobats and Folies-Bergère - Jack de Fer all respond to the same principle: "Folies-Bergère" in large characters in a banner, an illustration in bright colors and simple graphics, the name of the artist (s) whose number the spectator will be able to see, mention which, like the schedule, occupies the blanks left by the image.

Folies-Bergère - The elephant orchestra by Sam Lockart represents the moment of the show when the trainer (in the background) plays his animals, all standing on their hind legs. This ensemble, which evokes as much a fanfare roaming the streets as an orchestra, promises a fairly festive sound environment, the elephants joining their trumpets to more "classical" instruments.

In Folies-Bergère - The Trevallys, acrobats, a human pyramid crosses the image diagonally and defies the laws of gravity. On both sides appear other athletes in full effort. All wear the same outfit, which underlines both the collective character of their performances and their belonging to the brotherhood of acrobats. The illustration owes to its less vivid colors and finer line, symbolic of the lightness of the artists, a certain delicacy that distinguishes it from the two others.

Folies Bergère - Iron Jack announces a strength number: bracing on bent legs, the athlete lifts a horse with one arm. This effort brings out an "iron" musculature, a sign of supernatural power which is also reflected in the thick line and strong shadows. Its name, already explicit, has been drawn in a typography that suggests metal. Jack's costume has been carefully figured, in touches of nuanced color.

Interpretation

The “Folies-Bergère” brand

The three posters were produced by the printer and lithographer François Appel, whose studio was located at 12 rue du Delta, near the Folies-Bergère. At the head of a hundred workers, Appel was one of the main players in the tremendous extension of advertising chromolithography at the time. It supplies department stores with many "advertising cards" and produces hundreds of posters for food brands like Zan and Liebig. Most often intended for a relatively modest audience, the production of the Appel house is characteristic of popular imagery of the late 19th century.e century: bright colors, simple graphics and clear messages. The potential customer thus finds a familiar universe there, which encourages him to trust.

Produced for advertising purposes, the posters first sell a brand, that of Folies-Bergère, a name which acts as a sort of guarantee on the quality of the advertised number. Designed to inspire desire, the illustration depicts one of the most spectacular and exceptional moments, and thus promises the client that the artist (s) who make it (quite famous like Sam Lockhart or the Trevallys, less known for Jack de Fer) will give him value for his money. But if the cabaret has the reputation of cultivating the art of celebration and is in a certain way akin to the “Montmartre spirit”, these three chromolithographs are clearly distinguished from the posters by which, at the same time, the “village »Is exhibited, sold and represented: compared to that of the Chat noir or that of the Moulin-Rouge, a geographically and thematically close establishment which entrusted its own to Toulouse-Lautrec, the advertising of the Folies-Bergère testifies to less artistic daring and plays on more common codes.

  • circus
  • Shepherdess Follies
  • Hobbies
  • Paris

Bibliography

Alain CORBIN (dir.), L’Avent des loisirs (1850-1960), Paris, Aubier, 1995. Pascal JACOB, Le Cirque.Un art at the crossroads, Paris, Gallimard, coll. “Découvertes”, 2001.Dominique KALIFA, La Culture de masse en France.1860-1930, Paris, La Découverte, coll. "Repères", n ° 323, 2001.Marc MARTIN, Three centuries of advertising in France, Paris, O. Jacob, 1992.Michael TWYMAN, Color images.Godefroy Engelmann, Charles Hullmandel and the beginnings of chromolithography, Paris-Lyon , Panama Publishing-Museum of Printing, 2007.

To cite this article

Alexandre SUMPF, "The great parade of the Folies Bergère"


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