Great radio entertainment or the birth of a new hobby

Great radio entertainment or the birth of a new hobby

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  • The orchestra of the Radio-Luxembourg station.

    ANONYMOUS

  • The Duraton family receives Maurice Chevalier.

    ANONYMOUS

  • Benjamin's team in a studio with Mireille, at the desk, and Jean Nohain, on the far left.

    ANONYMOUS

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Title: The orchestra of the Radio-Luxembourg station.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

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Storage location: Illustration

Contact copyright: © The illustration - rights reserved

The orchestra of the Radio-Luxembourg station.

© The illustration - rights reserved

To close

Title: The Duraton family receives Maurice Chevalier.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Storage location: Illustration

Contact copyright: © The illustration - rights reserved

The Duraton family receives Maurice Chevalier.

© The illustration - rights reserved

To close

Title: Benjamin's team in a studio with Mireille, at the desk, and Jean Nohain, on the far left.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Date shown:

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Storage location: Eyedea - Keystone website

Contact copyright: © Keystone / Eyedea - "reproduction and exploitation prohibited without prior written agreement from the agency" website

Picture reference: M 3521

Benjamin's team in a studio with Mireille, at the desk, and Jean Nohain, on the far left.

© Keystone / Eyedea - "reproduction and exploitation prohibited without prior written agreement from the agency"

Publication date: October 2005

Historical context

The invention of programs
During the 1930s, airtime for radio stations doubled to three times. We owe them the launch of most of the successful formulas of the time, including The Duraton Family (Radio-Cité), The Treasure Race and The Incollables (on the Poste-Parisien, the first being hosted by Pierre Dac), the Radio Hook (from Radio-Cité and Radio-Toulouse) or the Featured Bar (Radio-37).

Image Analysis

The art and cost of the grid ...
This photographic corpus illustrates two aspects of the history of private stations in the 1930s. The advertising break of the Radio-Luxembourg orchestra shows that in terms of recruitment (musicians, hosts, speakers, technicians) and infrastructure development (studios , auditoriums, concert halls, etc.), private stations are investing large sums to meet the requirements of expanded schedules requiring increased professionalization of their designers, directors and actors (including orchestras).
With regard to professionalization and the most prominent hosts, the case of Saint-Granier highlights that at the end of the 1930s the success of the radio was also that of its star hosts. Given the age of radio, most of them have a background other than radio. This is the case for Saint-Granier, a former journalist, playwright and singer who also collaborates with The Duraton Family, Radio-Cité's cult radio soap opera, launched in 1936 with journalists Jean-Jacques Vital and Lise Élina (and actress and announcer Yvonne Galli, absent in the photo). They are seen here with Maurice Chevalier, whom they just interviewed on the show. The radio also recruits among the stars of the music hall. Thus Jean Nohain, lawyer, journalist and author of successful songs (including the famous Lying in the hay, 1936), he says among others Benjamin (1929), which would become a flagship children's program on the FL station. Likewise, singer and songwriter Mireille, seen here among the team of Benjamin, produces a variety show on Poste-Parisien.

Interpretation

The professionals of a mass leisure
Between the early 1920s and the end of the following decade, the history of radio was marked by its professionalization. At the end of this period, the share of programs "produced by non-professionals has become minimal". Radio is less and less artisanal, which we can clearly see in this photographic corpus illustrating the implementation of means incomparable to those of the pioneering wireless years, at a time when broadcasting and listening were still the responsibility of the prowess. Combined with the diversified increase in programs, the growth and modernization of household equipment (6 out of 10 were equipped in 1939), the radio acculturation of the greatest number (the generations of the 1920s and 1930s are born with the radio, while the previous ones had to tame it), this professionalization means that listening to the radio becomes the first hobby of the French, at a time - that of the Popular Front - when, precisely, their aspiration to leisure is growing and finds legitimacy in the socio-political debate. More broadly, the radio then asserted itself as a means of mass communication, which the Second World War and then the postwar period would radically confirm.

  • Hobbies
  • radio

Bibliography

Christian BROCHANDGeneral history of radio and television in Francetome I “1921-1944”, Paris, La Documentation française-Committee for the history of broadcasting, 1994. Michele de BUSSIERRE, Caroline MAURIAT and Cécile MÉADEL (dir.) Histoire des programs and games Paris, Gehra-CHTV-CHR, 1986 Michele de BUSSIERRE, Caroline MAURIAT and Cécile MÉADEL (dir.) History of radio and television audiences Paris, Gehra-CHTV-CHR, 1994 Agnès CHAUVEAU and Philippe TETARTI Introduction to the media history Paris, Armand Colin, 1999 Jean-Noël JEANNENEY (ed.) L'Écho du siècle Dictionary of radio and television in France Paris, Hachette-Arte-La Cinquième, 1999, 2nd updated edition, Pluriel, 2001.Cécile MÉADELHistory of radio in the thirties.From the wireless player to the listener.Paris, INA & Anthropos-Economica, 1994.Robert PROTDictionary of the radioGrenoble-Bry-sur-Marne, University presses of Grenoble-INA , 1997.

To cite this article

Philippe TETART, "Great radio entertainment or the birth of a new hobby"


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