1918: the end of the fighting attracts crowds

1918: the end of the fighting attracts crowds

  • Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle, November 11, 1918.

    DEVAMBEZ André (1867 - 1944)

  • Boulevard and Porte Saint-Denis, November 11, 1918.

    LEPRINCE Jean

  • President Wilson's Escort, Place Saint-Augstin, December 14, 1918.

    DEVAMBEZ André (1867 - 1944)

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Title: Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle, November 11, 1918.

Author : DEVAMBEZ André (1867 - 1944)

Date shown: November 11, 1918

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Technique and other indications: Exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1919.

Storage location:

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - François Vizzavona / Maryse El Garby

Picture reference: 97-026296 / VZC8120

Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle, November 11, 1918.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - François Vizzavona / Maryse El Garby

To close

Title: Boulevard and Porte Saint-Denis, November 11, 1918.

Author : LEPRINCE Jean (-)

Creation date : 1918

Date shown: November 11, 1918

Dimensions: Height 72 - Width 91

Technique and other indications: Oil on canvas.

Storage location: Carnavalet museum (Paris) website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - Bulloz

Picture reference: 03-009125 / P.1787

Boulevard and Porte Saint-Denis, November 11, 1918.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - Bulloz

To close

Title: President Wilson's Escort, Place Saint-Augstin, December 14, 1918.

Author : DEVAMBEZ André (1867 - 1944)

Date shown: December 12, 1918

Dimensions: Height 0 - Width 0

Technique and other indications: Exhibited at the Salon des Artistes Français in 1919.

Storage location: Petit Palais Museum

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais - François Vizzavona / Maryse El Garby

Picture reference: 97-026295 / VZC8119; INV634

President Wilson's Escort, Place Saint-Augstin, December 14, 1918.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais - François Vizzavona / Maryse El Garby

Publication date: October 2007

Historical context

Peace, finally ...

At the end of the war,

France has 1.4 million dead, which are as many bereaved families, amputated homes or which will never be created. These documents thus echo exuberant patriotism - but isn't it easy to be under such circumstances? - only the sorrow of the fathers, mothers, children or wives of combatants who will not return. For such people, such popular gatherings provide a fleeting respite, and perhaps a breath of hope.

as to the future.

Image Analysis

Celebrating the Armistice: From Spontaneous Protests to Tidy Parades

Pavoised windows, people strolling massed on the pavement: the painting of Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle is presented as an image of Epinal of the expressions of joy of November 11, 1918. The very picky, almost photographic rendering of this representation clearly says the spontaneity of the demonstrations of this very special day. Thus, the drivers of trucks and cars will have been very badly advised not to leave their machines in the garage… Elements of the same order emerge from the scene in front of the Saint-Denis gate, where farandoles of civilians snort on the first floor. shot under the wary gaze of some fighters. Bruised, the latter did not taste, in fact, the gay excesses of civilians. Here, impressionist overtones bring the idea of ​​an indefinite human magma - France figuratively, perhaps? "Subscribe to the Liberation loan", we can read on the right column of the monumental door: this is enough to remind the national scope of what is taking place. The photograph of Wilson's escort, by comparison, offers excellent insight into the state's takeover, weeks later, of the collective celebratory practices associated with the return of peace. There, in fact, onlookers are confined behind barriers and sentries in tight rows: the street is still diverted from its usual vocation, but the purposes have changed. The beautiful arrangement of the cavalry parade contrasts with the heckling of the previous documents. In addition to the victory of arms and the homage to the allies, it is the continuity of the State which is affirmed: the Republic recalls in these hours all the basis of its legitimacy, and continues to do so through the protocol of commemorations. .

Interpretation

Beyond the cheers, specific political issues

"The illuminations of victory played, for the French eyes, the role of the bright lights which, on summer evenings, attract moths. Dazzled, they could not, or knew how to appreciate at its exact value the state in which the war had left the country "(A. Ducasse et al., Life and death of the French, 1914-1918, p. 468). This after-the-fact judgment resonates singularly in the face of the images presented. Because France entered the war in 1914 provided with the values ​​and horizons of expectation of the Republic, and the law, justice, equality of all in the face of duty weighed heavily in the success of the mobilization. But the cracks that have gradually emerged within the Sacred Union have more than once threatened the balance. Mutinies, strikes, dissensus engendered by ambushes and war profiteers, the dead ... all these form a series of wounds that must be healed as quickly as possible once the chapter on hostilities has closed. The figure of Wilson, and his instrumentalization through propaganda, are emblematic in this regard. Crowned with a double crown of laurels, that of the decisive ally at the fateful moment (1917) and that of the builder of future peace, the American president drew acclaim and official pomp. Wilson is basically proof that the war was waged in the name of fair principle, since his country joined one side and not the other. But beyond this orchestration of facts, the feasts of the armistice, and their formal development, always and again come under the staging of the Sacred Union, a too-played score that the French people will not want for a few more years. late.

  • November 11th
  • tricolour flag
  • War of 14-18
  • American intervention
  • Paris
  • patriotism
  • city

Bibliography

Pierre VALLAUD, 14-18, World War I, volumes I and II, Paris, Fayard, 2004.Bruno CABANES The Grieving Victory.The French soldiers' exit from war (1918-1920) Paris, Seuil, 2004.André DUCASSE, Jacques MEYER and Gabriel PERREUX Life and Death of the French, 1914-1918 Paris, Hachette, 1962, p.468.Pierre MIQUELLa Peace of Versailles and French public opinion Paris, Flammarion, 1971.André KASPILe time of the Americans.The American competition for France , 1917-1918 Paris, Publications of the Sorbonne, 1976.

To cite this article

François BOULOC, "1918: the end of the fighting attracts the crowds"


Video: Armistice brings WWI fighting to an end, on November 11, 1918. German troops surr..HD Stock Footage